8

Do you really care which customer paid, or do you care which bill was paid? Say you have customers Anna and Bob, who both order something. Bob notices he's out of money, so Anna says she'll pay for both. If you really want the sender to reveal their identity, your system would already fail, as Bob never pays anything. In almost all cases, all you care ...


7

More accurately, the pseudonyms most commonly used are addresses, which are derived from public keys (not the longer public keys themselves). In order for Bitcoin's idea to work, you must have coins that can only be spent by the owner of a given private key. This means that whatever you send to must be tied, in some way, to a public key. Using arbitrary ...


6

Bitcoins and satoshis do not have unique identities. However, Bitcoin balances are stored in uniquely identifiable "transaction outputs" that can only be spent by the owner of the recipient address. Example: Alice sends Bob 1 BTC, Bob uses it to send another payment. When Alice sends Bob a payment of 1 BTC, she signs a transaction that deducts 1 ...


5

The identity does not get checked. The only check that is being performed is that the transaction was signed by the correct private key. It is inferred that whoever has access to the private key is the owner. The identity of the owner is deemed irrelevant. To distinguish payments, you give out a new receiving address for each bill. That way, when an ...


4

No, there isn't. Bitcoin has no central management of anything at all. Public keys are pseudonymous and in general it may not be possible to identify the user to whom a public key belongs. A private key is kept by the user who generated it, and typically is never revealed to anybody else.


4

No, there is not. Bitcoin is what is called "pseudonymous", meaning that a bitcoin address does not reveal information about the owner of that address. Bitcoin addresses (like the one you posted) are derived by using two types of cryptographic operations, elliptic curves and hash functions...both of which only operate in one direction. Even if you could ...


4

The paragraph you copied from the Bitcoin wiki is imprecise. Transactions result in transaction outputs that usually are associated with specific addresses. I.e. there is a balance of bitcoins associated with an address, that only can be spent by an order signed with the address' corresponding private key. The bitcoins itself are not identifiable, rather ...


4

He was probably referring to the payment protocol, which lets merchants (optionally) attach their online identity to payment requests, so customers can be assured they are actually paying who they think they are paying. The payment protocol leverages the existing identity infrastructure that we all use every day on the web-- the same infrastructure used by ...


3

Different orders have different Bitcoin payment addresses. The order is paid when the address in question receives the requested amount of Bitcoins.


3

Bitcoin is focused on assuring that the payment is legit. It doesn't help at all with the payer. Waiting for confirmations gives you very strong assurance that the payment is genuine and final, and that neither the payer nor any outside authority can do anything to reverse it. The money is yours, full stop. There are no chargebacks. However, you don't ...


3

Bitcoin provides no protection against such attacks. It is up to each user to verify that an address belongs to the person they really want to send money to.


2

You can't find out whether 2 blocks have been mined by the same entity (e.g. person) for sure. Guessing is possible. If you go to http://blockchain.info, you'll see a "Relayed By" column in the table right on the start page. You can be reasonably sure that that mining pool mined the block. Some mining pools always send their money to the same address. In ...


2

No, it's not necessary to disclose the identity. As Pieter commented below, "foundBy is a feature of blockchain.info, a privately operated website, which gives a guess about the creator of a block. It is by no means something that's part of the protocol". If you look at the receiving address of the block's coinbase, you'll see that BitFury sends all their ...


2

"randomly selected scientists" - randomly selected by whom? And will you have scientists in every city across the world? And how will they get paid? Ideas like that are practically impossible, and if you remember how PGP key signing parties ended up you'll understand why nobody is pursuing it. The way Identifi is doing trust and reputation is one way to ...


2

The only practical way to verify the identity of a user is to make the user sign something with their private key. The only identity information that you get at that point is that the user has access to the private key. On the bitcoin blockchain, the owner of the private key is the only one that can move the bitcoins locked to that key because a signature is ...


2

I think you're looking for a "mixing" service (I've also heard it called "tumbling"). The idea is you mix your coins with those belonging to others, and send the output to new addresses in new configurations. This makes the "taint" (percentage of coins traceable back to a single address) pretty murky. Take a look at Mixing Services on bitcoin.it. These ...


2

Your understanding of Bitcoin is correct. What you may not know is that the "advisable security practice" of using a unique address for each transaction is not followed by many block chain gambling sites, such as SatoshiDice. Because these sites reuse addresses, transactions sent to those addresses can be flagged or blocked. Even if this were not the case,...


2

No, it will not. The information on the scanned image must be very clear and show a clear photograph. It is best to scan the ID using a quality scanner. Even a picture taken on a smartphone and filtered with a "scanning" program was insufficient for their requirements. Source: I lazily tried everything, getting rejected each time, then finally going and ...


2

Good questions! If I understood the site's content correctly the answer to 2nd question is yes: At each distribution, each Icelander citizen will be given coins only once, so I guess one AUR-address per Kennitala ID is enforced somehow. The part I'd like to know is how they're going to track which citizen has applied for which distribution: Should a lot of ...


2

When simplified a lot, Bitcoin address can be seen as a public / private key pair. Wallet can contain several addresses. There is no relationship back from the address to an wallet - basically wallet is just a list of addresses known to you. Wallet also knows the private key to these addresses which it is using when you send Bitcoins out from a wallet. ...


2

I read that wallet/account is not the same as bitcoin address. A bitcoin-wallet is only a way to store multiple private keys (corresponding to multiple bitcoin-address). The address can be used only for single transaction. How do you receive donations on your address? Addresses can be used for an infinite number of transactions. If you put a donation ...


2

As mentioned in the above comment, these are Blockstack IDs. https://blockstack.org/blog/browser-public-alpha


1

1 and 2 are statements. One is a bit difficult to understand, cause bitcoin is a peer to peer network, where you don't have to trust middleman. Miners facilitate the transaction between two adresses, not between two person or wallets. and yes, for their work to create blocks and as such secure the blockchain they get incentivised. not really. I'd like to ...


1

I am in the process of buying bitcoins and am being required to put in a lot of personal details. The Bitcoin network itself requires no identifying information from users. In fact, efforts have been made to make transactions / addresses as indistinguishable from one-another as possible, in order to provide the best fungibility and privacy for users of the ...


1

Exchanges generate a new address for each user when a user wants to deposit, so when they receive a deposit to a specific address, they know who to credit the deposit to. Since Bitcoin does not use accounts, there is no need for the exchange to consolidate their received Bitcoin. They can simply spend from multiple addresses when they want to send Bitcoin ...


1

The way you track payments is to hand out unique addresses to each customer. This way you know who to attribute payments to. However the customer could always ask someone else to pay to your address. There is no way to be sure that he made the payment himself. And BTW I mean your addresses not the buyer's. You never ever track payments based on the sending ...


1

A seed defines a collection of private keys, which in turn generate addresses. Source: What's the difference between a seed (12 or 24 words) and a private key? You can trace every transaction because transactions are public information. But you only see the addresses and amounts, you don't know which person belongs to an address. For tracing ...


1

As I understand, you have two options: Ask foodmart to give you payment request instead of only a bitcoin address. A SignedPaymentRequest bundles a PaymentRequest with a digital identity and signature, so you can be sure that you are paying the correct person or merchant. This was introduced in BIP70 and supported by these major bitcoin wallets Use another ...


1

You can see addresses and transactions. But you can't get the owner of this address unless he or someone else is publishing the identity. For example, this happend when the coins of silk road where seized: 1F1tAaz5x1HUXrCNLbtMDqcw6o5GNn4xqX. Everyone can check where those coins went to from there on. Blockchain.info allows people to add a note to an address,...


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