12

There is a protocol rule which prohibits generated BTC from being spent until it has 100 confirmations. The Satoshi client has an additional safety margin: it won't let you spend generated BTC until it has 120 confirmations. The purpose of this rule is to prevent long chain splits from invalidating lots of transactions that spend newly-generated BTC. For ...


10

Immature coins are coins that were created in a block reward and haven't aged sufficiently, yet. The problem with block rewards is that they could still disappear again, if the generating block ends up being invalidated by a competing block chain. In order to minimize the confusion and subsequent problems from someone spending coins that end up disappearing ...


8

Using the listtransactions command, you can see your immature coinbase transactions listed with category immature. listtransactions appears to include both spent and unspent transactions in general, but since immature coins cannot be spent, that shouldn't be a problem. Since accounts are now deprecated, you can get the immature balance for the entire ...


7

This rule is to prevent people from unintentionally spending Bitcoins that they wind up not owning. For any Bitcoins other than the block reward, unless you intentionally double spend, a reorganization leaves your transactions valid. So they can just be included in the new blocks. (Assuming they don't spend the proceeds of a double spend.) However, if ...


5

Receiving bitcoins is a completely passive process: The information of the received transaction gets added to the blockchain enabling you to reference it in the future when you want to spend the balance. The recipient doesn't have to acknowledge, confirm or even notice the transaction in order for it to be settled. Maturation usually refers to newly ...


5

No, your wallet does not have to be online. Maturity depends on the block number in which a transaction was included into the blockchain.


5

The reason for this is that if a fork were to occur, some blocks will be orphaned and not have any coins which can be rebroadcast. If a block containing a transaction you send me gets orphaned, I can still get my coins, but if the block you are sending me coins from gets orphaned, I can not rebroadcast since the coinbase no longer exists on the valid chain.


4

If the block doesn't end up in the main chain, the miner effectively doesn't get the reward. Attempts to spend it will not be accepted as valid payment by others. There is a "maturity" rule that rewards cannot be spent at all until 100 more blocks have been added to the chain following it. This helps ensure that a miner doesn't spend coins from a reward ...


3

The blocks on the chain that loses are essentially forgotten. (It's better to call them losing blocks, than "bad" blocks, because they were legal and offered in good faith. They just lost a network race.) Thus on the winning chain, there's no record of the losing-block reward, or the transaction fees. If there's no record of it in the common history, you ...


3

If you look in debug.log, you should see a message that says "proof-of-work found". Here is an excerpt from debug.log for a testnet block that I found. (It was immediately orphaned; in fact an earlier block had been found several minutes earlier but had not yet reached me. So you won't find it in the blockchain.) BitcoinMiner: proof-of-work found ...


2

100​. You could argue 120 too. It's the same as Bitcoin. static const int COINBASE_MATURITY = 100; Source Now, this is the amount of time before other nodes will let you spend your mining income. However, the client will wait 120 blocks before telling you that the generation has matured. int CMerkleTx::GetBlocksToMaturity() const { if (!...


2

In Bitcoin block rewards cannot be spent until they have become "mature". This happens once 100 blocks are mined on top of a block. The idea is that new bitcoins should not be spread around while they may still become invalid due to reorganizations. In Monero the maturity depth is 60 blocks, which is reached after about two hours. I assume that Cryptonote ...


1

all coinbase transactions are timelocked from when they are mined, so they are not spendable for a few days i believe. by that time, the block is near impossible to reverse and you can spend the new coins.


1

The act of mining a block does not reward the miner with coins. The miner has coins attributed to him if a block he mined is on the blockchain. Say miner A successfully mined a block and now has +12.5 BTC attributed to him. After some time, the chain he is on becomes shorter than some other chain. On that other chain, mining a block by miner A never happened....


1

"Immature" blocks should be valid, but they require 100-120 confirmations before they can be spent. On testnet this may take up to 40 hours or so. If you have the block hash (it should be in debug.log if not elsewhere), you ought to be able to find these blocks on http://blockexplorer.com/testnet and see them linked into the block chain. "Orphaned" blocks ...


1

Only blocks that are part of the longest chain are considered valid. Each longest chain considers competing longest chains to be invalid until proven otherwise. Example: Block A was last. Block B1 and B2 are discovered at almost the same moment in the network and broadcasted such that each is received by about half the network first. Let's assume ...


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