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Some additional guidance is in share/examples/bitcoin.conf to add to Nontenda's answer. Let's say for instance you use addnode=4.2.2.4, addnode will connect you to and tell you about the nodes connected to 4.2.2.4. In addition it will tell the other nodes connected to it that you exist so they can connect to you. connect will not do the above when you &...


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When it says, "connect" it is referring to connecting in the TCP/IP sense. The vulnerability simply required you having the ability to open a TCP/IP connection to bitcoind's RPC port, which is before any concept of authentication even comes into play. It isn't that it was possible to send JSON-RPC commands to bitcoind without authentication (this ...


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To create a new wallet run the following in your terminal: electrum create The above will output a short message of instruction, the path, and the seed to the screen. You can read more about this command on its man page that can be accessed via electrum help create.


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There's a discussion on this with some answers here: Cannot call rpc api from other machine in same local network tl;dr: you need to also set the rpcbind setting to something like rpcbind=0.0.0.0 or rpcbind='ipaddress of node'. I needed to start the daemon with the -rpcbind=... option, it wouldn't work if I just set it in the conf file.


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To expand on the answer from @Slavik Svyrydiuk : it only worked for me when starting the daemon with those options (-rpcbind=0.0.0.0 -rpcallowip=192.168.1.0/24). If I set those in the conf and just started it like normal (sudo bitcoind -daemon) then it WOULD NOT open the port to external connections. It works only if I start the daemon with those settings ...


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It depends on what you want. If you want to know the amount of currency that has been available for miners to bring into circulation (the "210000-1 blocks of 50 BTC, then 210000 blocks of 25 BTC, then 210000 blocks of 12.5 BTC, ..." rule), the answer is no, there is no RPC that computes this. It's easy to do yourself, though. If you want to compute ...


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For anyone else finding this, and the problem was NOT a typo like in the accepted answer: The issue for me was simply that I had my conf file in the wrong location. I installed this on Ubuntu 20.04 and saved the conf file in /.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf, but it was looking in /home/user, which was actually ~.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf. Saving the conf file in the ...


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The RPC you're looking for is settxfee, which sets the fee per kilo(v)byte. For example bitcoin-cli settxfee 0.00027100 is making bitcoind use a feerate of 27.1 sat/vbyte for all future transactions.


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