4

Yes, you can. The transaction will just not be a SegWit transaction, and not receive its benefits (including lower fees for a given confirmation speed).


4

Using words to back up wallets is a process described in BIP 39. Basically, the mnemonic is converted into a seed. This seed is then used as the seed to a Heirarchical Deterministic (HD) wallet, as laid out in BIP 32. The seed is used to generate a Master Extended Private Key, from which all other private keys can be generated. The child key generation ...


3

It is a common misconception that there are actual objects or chunks of data that are Bitcoin and that your wallet receives. That is actually not the case; your Bitcoin are just values attached to outputs created by previous transactions. Most of these outputs (and the type that your Ledger is designed for) require that the spending transaction contain a ...


3

From Michał Zabielski's comment: Unfortunately you are out of luck. Never share your word phrase with anyone. If you do, you effectively give access to your money to someone else. If someone asks you about your word phrase (or anything related to private keys) you can be pretty sure that it’s a scam. To clarify, the device's security was not breached. In ...


3

Find the HD Public key for your wallets: Open the Ledger Wallet Chrome bitcoin app Click your account in the overview, it’s called “My account” by default Click “Account Settings” in the top right corner, under the balance Click “Export” next to “Extended public key” And when you see the QR code pop, you’re ready to begin the next part. You can test the ...


3

From BIP39:"A user may decide to protect their mnemonic with a passphrase. If a passphrase is not present, an empty string "" is used instead." The passphrase can be added in the transformation from the mnemonic phrase to the seed. It is not added IN the mnemonic but in an other point of the procedure. A consequence of this is that: "The described method ...


3

Ledger uses a secure element chip to store the private key. In simplified terms this means that the private key is stored on a special chip that is almost like a small computer with a Operating System with a very strict and well defined interface. This interface is designed to NEVER allow an extraction of the private key except during the creation of the ...


3

Wouldn't it be saver to generate a mnemonic passphrase manually by just taking random words from a lookup table? No, it would not be. This method may even be insecure if you are actually doing it manually. A BIP 39 mnemonic, if generated properly, is secure. It is just as secure if you randomly choose words too. This is because both methods require a ...


3

If LBC is somehow able to guess anyone's private key, regardless of how the private key is normally stored and generated, then yes, they can just spend the coins. All you need is the private key, it does not matter how the key was obtained. Of course this is impossible to do in practice with today's technology. The range of possible private keys is ...


3

You can use them, but you need to ensure that the hardware wallets use the same address derivation paths. For the hardware wallets you mentioned (Trezor and Ledger) both of them use the BIP 39/BIP 44 derivation paths, so that should work, especially in the case of Bitcoin. However care has to be taken for certain coins (ETH or any other ERC-20 for example) ...


3

I understand these wallets only work with provider's mobile app, online interface or their computer software, correct ? No. Some of the most popular hardware wallets are supported by third party software. For example, Trezors and Ledgers can be used with Electrum who have implemented support for these devices directly. Other wallet software like Wasabi ...


3

There's distinction of "bitcoin" and "bitcoin segwit". It's just Bitcoin.


2

I have a HW.1 too. I purchased mine, so it came with the recovery card. If you have your recovery card, you might be able to contact their support and ask how you could convert your security card's details into the 16 byte key If you can't do this, then use the link you posted previously to generate a random key, and then generate your card. Remember to ...


2

The ledger_index is the 256-bit index of a particular entry in the ledger. The ledger's state tree is a hash tree of index/value pairs. Each index is a 256-bit hash of some kind of locator. If the entry is, say, an account root node, the index is a hash of the 160-bit account ID. If the entry is, say, a ripple balance node, the index is a hash of the two ...


2

From the Nano S Configuration Guide: How to erase or reset your Ledger Nano S? If you acquired a second-hand Ledger Nano S, or if you want to create a second wallet, follow this tutorial to learn how to reset your device first. Connect your Ledger Nano S Enter a wrong PIN code and validate by pressing both buttons Repeat the 2nd step two more times Once ...


2

Those are valid mnemonics with valid checksums. In the bip39 spec is the following: The following table describes the relation between the initial entropy length (ENT), the checksum length (CS) and the length of the generated mnemonic sentence (MS) in words. CS = ENT / 32 MS = (ENT + CS) / 11 | ENT | CS | ENT+CS | MS | +-------+----+------...


2

Yes, you can use a single Ledger for multiple coins. Here is the list of supported coins.


2

You need to update the udev rules (on the guest OS) with this command: wget -q -O - https://raw.githubusercontent.com/LedgerHQ/udev-rules/master/add_udev_rules.sh | sudo bash It works, I verified it. source: https://support.ledgerwallet.com/hc/en-us/articles/115005165269


2

when the address to give me my change showed up on my Ledger nano wallet I hit the x instead of the check mark. I don't think I got my change That is not how a transaction works, if you did indeed send a transaction, the change would be returned to you automatically. There would be no additional steps required for you to ‘claim your change’, that simply isn’...


2

You can't. Bitcoin Core currently does not support importing extended public keys.


2

With an 8-digit PIN, the number of possible PIN combinations is 10^8 (100,000,000), ranging from 00000000 to 99999999. So you chance of just guessing the PIN correctly within three tries is about 1 in 33,333,333. So it is of course possible, but extremely unlikely. Note that an attacker could perhaps increase their chances by eliminating some possibilities ...


2

Ledger Wallet doesn't support RBF but you can do Child Pays For Parent: Make a transaction to your address 3M6EhQL3QUQHAFkSPH3vLc3VDCrJKP3iMv with amount 0.011, set a fee rate, preview the transaction and check and confirm the transaction only if one of the inputs is 0.01187067 BTC. If this doesn't work, download Electrum and CPFP from there. But honestly, ...


2

Here is my understanding - please let me know if any-step is incorrect. All correct. Since my computer is not a node, how does my client software "send the message to the network". I presume I need to be connected to wifi. Then what? Ledger Live, I believe, just connects to Ledger's service, and it uses Ledger's node. If you care about privacy ...


1

Right. PIN just protect the configuration. It is not an input in the calculation. The first normal address should be m/44'/0'/0'/0/0, the first *change address should be m/44'/0'/0'/1/0. If you use segwit-p2sh m/49'/0'/0'/0/0 and m/49'/0'/0'/1/0. Native segwit: m/84'/0'/0'/0/0 and m/84'/0'/0'/1/0. And so on Use the command line utils in pycoin. Pretty up-...


1

Third Parties should extend your mnemonic phrase with your passphrase else they will get a different wallet with different addresses. Electrum and some other wallets call the passphrase a "seed extension" or "mnemonic extension". Third parties should have an option to extend mnemonic phrase with your passphrase, It's a weird idea to possibly have enough ...


1

If you have a look at https://github.com/bitcoin/bips you can find all BIP's. Scrolling down to the README, you will find the list number and title of every BIP and the current status. The BIP process with definitions for the status codes and other aspects is in BIP0002. At the top of the page you can search for P2SH or Pay to Script Hash and find many ...


1

I don't know about Ledger specifically, but for HD wallets in general, private and public keys are not generated randomly. Rather, they are generated by a deterministic algorithm from the seed (in this case, the 24 words). So they are absolutely "tied" to the seed. When you add a wallet for another coin, keys for that wallet would presumably be generated ...


1

Ledger should recover all your funds including any altcoins like XRP from your 24-word recovery phrase. You may read technical details about the process in BIP44. I'm not sure whether there is an official Ledger tool for deriving keys for XPR from recovery phrase. You may use Ian Coleman's BIP39 Mnemonic Code Converter. It is possible to launch this site on ...


1

Since the bitcoin address entered by mistake and litecoin address intended are derived from same mnemonic words, simple scanning the mnemonic into a litecoin wallet that scans a bit of the HD-key tree for balance, should work. You can try entering your mnemonic at https://iancoleman.io/bip39/ and playing with the values. If you fix the purpose to 44 and ...


1

If you send some criptocurrency to an address that is of another criptocurrency that is a valid address in the first one too you have lost your money if you don't own that address in the criptocurrency you made the transaction from. The only way I can think you could recover the money sent is to make another transaction to an address you own while the wrong ...


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