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2

If you agree to buy your neighbour's old lawnmower using buttons and lint as payment, the SEC don't want or need to know about your novel form of payment. The same generally applies to other forms of payment. Generally where a taxable event occurs, you have to work out the equivalent amount in some government approved currency. For example, if the price of ...


3

If I cannot understand the laws/regulations, what am I supposed to do? A fairly widespread legal rule is that ignorance of the law is no defence. If you don't understand how the law applies to your situation, you are expected to seek help from someone who does. You can contact your local tax authorities and ask them, or you can pay for advice from a tax-...


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Regarding Point 5 - I found this passage in an E-Mail from Satoshi Nakamoto: «I had to write all the code before I could convince myself that I could solve every problem, then I wrote the paper. I think I will be able to release the code sooner than I could write a detailed spec.» (https://www.metzdowd.com/pipermail/cryptography/2008-November/014832.html). ...


5

While it is true that Bitcoin can still be physically taken away from you, it is still much harder to do that than it is for a government to confiscate your fiat stored in a bank account (as most fiat is). With fiat in a bank account, the government can simply go to your bank and order them to freeze your account and lock you out of it. There is no need for ...


1

Disclaimer: IANAL, this is not legal advice, the following are some lines of thought that I've seen on the matter that seem plausible to me: The original client was published under MIT License. The whitepaper was packaged with the original client. The license statement explicitly covers the "included documentation". It seems plausible that the ...


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I want to comment this 7 years later. In the meantime it's not difficult anymore to trace bitcoin to exchanges in the most cases. It doesn't mean that people get the stolen coins back. But it's not a question of possibilities, it's a question of too few specialists able to do so. Successfull scammers have to manage a lot of bitcoin addresses and one little ...


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No, he wouldn't be able to sue. Basically the Statute of limitations for scam is 5 years, after this delay the claim can be dropped in court. Even if he still went for it, he would only be entitled to the USD value of the transaction at that moment. It would be unreasonable to ask for a refund 10000x the price that was paid, see I paid in bitcoin, now I&#...


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