Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
43

Bitcoin is very resistant to typos because the addresses contain a built-in check code. So if you had simply mistyped a few of the letters or numbers in the address, it's unlikely the client would have let you send them. If, however, you pasted in a different and valid address, the coins are already transferred to it permanently. In this scenario, Bitcoin ...


27

If a wallet file is truly lost with zero ability to recover it, then the coins it contained are lost forever. Think of it as cash left in a burning house. Be sure to periodically backup your wallet.dat file. It is best to also encrypt those backups lest they be compromised giving someone else access to your wallet.


24

It is highly unlikely, you made a typo and were still able to send coins. There is a difference between an invalid address and an incorrect address. All bitcoin wallets/clients check if addresses are valid. Bitcoin addresses are the PubKeyHash encoded in Base58 with a version value and a checksum. The checksum is the leftmost 32 bits of a double hash of ...


18

Your coins still exist, but your ability to use them is gone. No one knows this, as they still appear to be perfectly valid. And, in fact, if you ever recovered your wallet somehow (say you discovered a backup on a USB key somewhere), you could then spend them.


12

The Bitcoins never disappear, but if you lose your wallet, then you lack the keys necessary to actually use those Bitcoins. So although the coins do not disappear, they are effectively removed from the economy since you cannot spend them. This is why it is important to backup your wallet.


8

Bitcoin transactions are irreversible. If you were connected to the network when you made the transaction, your coins are lost. If you weren't connected to the network, you can restore your wallet.dat and start bitcoin with the --rescan option. This will effectively undo the transaction (that hasn't been committed to the blockchain yet).


8

Well, you don't need different addresses for sending and receiving bitcoins. In fact, you don't have to worry about addresses at all. The Bitcoin client will create addresses when you need one for receiving payments and it will automatically send bitcoins using one of the addresses you previously received coins with. If you generated the address on ...


8

If you still have the wallet.dat file and your password you can access your bitcoins. You do not have to use Bitcoin-Qt 7 and it does not matter if your wallet ever synced before. If the sender sent the bitcoins to an address you control and the transaction was confirmed, the bitcoin are yours. https://blockchain.info/wallet/import-wallet If you want to ...


7

You might want to check out this great comment by Pieter Wuille: There will never be more than 20999839.77085749 BTC. Reasons for this number being lower than the often-cited "21 million": The subsidy scheme (50 BTC per block, halves every 210000 blocks) is rounded down to satoshi's (0.00000001 BTC), which results in slightly less already (...


7

To include details from your comment: you were trying to send coins from your account at some sort of online marketplace. Losing coins because of an address typo is generally not supposed to happen; however, preventing it requires that the marketplace has designed their software properly. The fact that it got as far as it did suggests that they have ...


6

I'd assume it's just so people reading the docs won't try to "tip" the writer and send to a foobar address that was made up for the sake of example That is correct! Other than that, there is no other real point at all. These bitcoins are gone forever and no one will ever be able to get them. However there is some projects or new coins that does Proof-Of-...


6

Essentially you must send coins to an address that is provably unspendable. There are many ways to do this. Put the coins in an OP_RETURN output. These outputs are provably unspendable because the consensus rules prevent it. Send coins to any script which resolves to false. Since addresses are encoded hashes, start with a hash, of which it would be nearly ...


5

What you are seeing is a "change address". When you send an amount that is less than you originally received, it sends the whole amount, and returns the difference to your wallet as "change". This change may not be spendable until the transaction is confirmed. The change address is different each time, which makes it harder for a third party to tell for ...


5

Yes. This is because of the decentralized nature of Bitcoin. You are the master of your own private keys. With great freedom comes great responsibility. You have to come up with your own precautions.


4

Bitcoin address include checksums, so it is less likely that you made a casual typo and entered a valid bitcoin address. However if the address is valid and also incorrect, then it is likely that the coins are effectively destroyed. You can check the address on the block chain explorer. It may help you determine if the address was a valid address (say a ...


4

The point is that someone obviously made up the sentence and then adapted the last few places to make it adhere to the checksum test, i.e. it is a valid Bitcoin address. On the other hand, it's certain that it's not an address someone generated randomly (because vanity addresses of that length would take way too much effort to generate). Thus, it's a "safe ...


4

All of the information in the screenshot is publicly available. And no, they won't be useful for recovering your Bitcoin. If you used Electrum, you either need the wallet, the recovery phrase(seeds) or the private key(s) to recover you Bitcoins. Note that when you first create your wallet, you are instructed to write down the seed (12 or 13 dictionary words)...


4

Is there a way to just manually transfer the btc from the old wallet into a new wallet we do have access to No. You need at least one of the things you have none of working wallet. PIN or password for the wallet. Recovery phrase for the wallet. is there any way to extract the password or private keys directly from the wallet file? No. The brute-...


3

Most transactions create an Unspent Transaction Output (UTXO) which can only be spent by the owner of the corresponding recipient address. Any "well-formed address" can receive such a transaction, whether it has been used before or not. Should somebody own the address, they might try to send the money back to the original sending address, however, it is ...


3

The wallet belongs to someone and you've just sent him money. (Can one contact this person and ask for it to be returned?) The key phrase is "can one contact" not "can you force him to give it back." Not unless the owner of that address has publicly stated that she owns that address (perhaps on her blog or on a forum? Try googling). The wallet (as ...


3

50btc was hacked some time ago and the hacker completely messed up all account balances. If you actually have mined over 200 BTC there, I suggest you contact the administrators. But I assume you're just one of the people who woke up one day and saw that your 0.001 mining profit had been replaced with a completely arbitrary number of coins, in which case no, "...


3

Yes it's possible to lose bitcoins forever. There are even ways to "provably destroy" them by sending them to an address that can't possibly have a private key.


3

Bitcoin Addresses contain a check-value: extra data added on computed as a function of the rest so that mistakes are unlikely to be acceptable addresses. 1x and 3x addresses use a 32-bit cryptographic hash for their check value and as a result any given well formatted random address has roughly a 1 in 2^32 chance of being accepted. But when users make ...


3

MultiBit developer here. You'll need to use MultiBit Classic version 0.5.19 available as a download from the site https://multibit.org. This will allow you to open the .key file and synchronise with the block chain to recover all the funds associated with the private keys held in the file. Once you have imported the keys, we strongly recommend that you ...


3

If what you are saying is true it sounds like the company you are working with is at fault. They provided you with a deposit address, then implemented a change to the site, and now having issues with deposits. It will be hard to prove, but it sounds like they misplaced your funds. Your only option is working with them to offer you a refund as there is no way ...


3

Try searching the address at blockchain.info with the following link https://blockchain.info/address/<your_addres_here> It will give the current balance of that address, the transactions it was involved. Just in case if your bitcoins were transferred somewhere you would know.


3

It seems someone obtained your private key. If you are sure you did not authorize this transaction, consider that paper wallet compromised and never use it again. If you generated the wallet online (just by opening the website), your keys may have been stolen by malware / keylogger of some kind. If you need to generate a paper wallet, a better way is to ...


3

Without any additional information, it is tough to provide help. Bitcoin is a decentralized network, so there is no central authority that can do something like authenticate your identity and provide access to your coins again. Understand that if you lost your ability to access the coins, they are essentially unrecoverable. Owning a bitcoin is equivalent to ...


2

What version are you on ? If you have earlier than 0.5.9 I recommend upgrading. The latest code also picks up pending transactions when you do a reset. Also, you might want to do a reset blockchain from before when you created the wallet to make sure you have all the transactions on the blockchain.


2

I had the same problem. What I had to do is delete the copy of the blockchain and let the newly installed bitcoin qt download and sync from scratch. All was good after that.


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