24

It is highly unlikely, you made a typo and were still able to send coins. There is a difference between an invalid address and an incorrect address. All bitcoin wallets/clients check if addresses are valid. Bitcoin addresses are the PubKeyHash encoded in Base58 with a version value and a checksum. The checksum is the leftmost 32 bits of a double hash of ...


8

Well, you don't need different addresses for sending and receiving bitcoins. In fact, you don't have to worry about addresses at all. The Bitcoin client will create addresses when you need one for receiving payments and it will automatically send bitcoins using one of the addresses you previously received coins with. If you generated the address on ...


8

If you still have the wallet.dat file and your password you can access your bitcoins. You do not have to use Bitcoin-Qt 7 and it does not matter if your wallet ever synced before. If the sender sent the bitcoins to an address you control and the transaction was confirmed, the bitcoin are yours. https://blockchain.info/wallet/import-wallet If you want to ...


7

You might want to check out this great comment by Pieter Wuille: There will never be more than 20999839.77085749 BTC. Reasons for this number being lower than the often-cited "21 million": The subsidy scheme (50 BTC per block, halves every 210000 blocks) is rounded down to satoshi's (0.00000001 BTC), which results in slightly less already (...


7

To include details from your comment: you were trying to send coins from your account at some sort of online marketplace. Losing coins because of an address typo is generally not supposed to happen; however, preventing it requires that the marketplace has designed their software properly. The fact that it got as far as it did suggests that they have ...


6

I'd assume it's just so people reading the docs won't try to "tip" the writer and send to a foobar address that was made up for the sake of example That is correct! Other than that, there is no other real point at all. These bitcoins are gone forever and no one will ever be able to get them. However there is some projects or new coins that does Proof-Of-...


6

Essentially you must send coins to an address that is provably unspendable. There are many ways to do this. Put the coins in an OP_RETURN output. These outputs are provably unspendable because the consensus rules prevent it. Send coins to any script which resolves to false. Since addresses are encoded hashes, start with a hash, of which it would be nearly ...


5

What you are seeing is a "change address". When you send an amount that is less than you originally received, it sends the whole amount, and returns the difference to your wallet as "change". This change may not be spendable until the transaction is confirmed. The change address is different each time, which makes it harder for a third party to tell for ...


4

The point is that someone obviously made up the sentence and then adapted the last few places to make it adhere to the checksum test, i.e. it is a valid Bitcoin address. On the other hand, it's certain that it's not an address someone generated randomly (because vanity addresses of that length would take way too much effort to generate). Thus, it's a "safe ...


4

All of the information in the screenshot is publicly available. And no, they won't be useful for recovering your Bitcoin. If you used Electrum, you either need the wallet, the recovery phrase(seeds) or the private key(s) to recover you Bitcoins. Note that when you first create your wallet, you are instructed to write down the seed (12 or 13 dictionary words)...


4

Is there a way to just manually transfer the btc from the old wallet into a new wallet we do have access to No. You need at least one of the things you have none of working wallet. PIN or password for the wallet. Recovery phrase for the wallet. is there any way to extract the password or private keys directly from the wallet file? No. The brute-...


3

MultiBit developer here. You'll need to use MultiBit Classic version 0.5.19 available as a download from the site https://multibit.org. This will allow you to open the .key file and synchronise with the block chain to recover all the funds associated with the private keys held in the file. Once you have imported the keys, we strongly recommend that you ...


3

Yes it's possible to lose bitcoins forever. There are even ways to "provably destroy" them by sending them to an address that can't possibly have a private key.


3

Most transactions create an Unspent Transaction Output (UTXO) which can only be spent by the owner of the corresponding recipient address. Any "well-formed address" can receive such a transaction, whether it has been used before or not. Should somebody own the address, they might try to send the money back to the original sending address, however, it is ...


3

The wallet belongs to someone and you've just sent him money. (Can one contact this person and ask for it to be returned?) The key phrase is "can one contact" not "can you force him to give it back." Not unless the owner of that address has publicly stated that she owns that address (perhaps on her blog or on a forum? Try googling). The wallet (as ...


3

Bitcoin Addresses contain a check-value: extra data added on computed as a function of the rest so that mistakes are unlikely to be acceptable addresses. 1x and 3x addresses use a 32-bit cryptographic hash for their check value and as a result any given well formatted random address has roughly a 1 in 2^32 chance of being accepted. But when users make ...


3

50btc was hacked some time ago and the hacker completely messed up all account balances. If you actually have mined over 200 BTC there, I suggest you contact the administrators. But I assume you're just one of the people who woke up one day and saw that your 0.001 mining profit had been replaced with a completely arbitrary number of coins, in which case no, "...


3

If what you are saying is true it sounds like the company you are working with is at fault. They provided you with a deposit address, then implemented a change to the site, and now having issues with deposits. It will be hard to prove, but it sounds like they misplaced your funds. Your only option is working with them to offer you a refund as there is no way ...


3

Try searching the address at blockchain.info with the following link https://blockchain.info/address/<your_addres_here> It will give the current balance of that address, the transactions it was involved. Just in case if your bitcoins were transferred somewhere you would know.


3

It seems someone obtained your private key. If you are sure you did not authorize this transaction, consider that paper wallet compromised and never use it again. If you generated the wallet online (just by opening the website), your keys may have been stolen by malware / keylogger of some kind. If you need to generate a paper wallet, a better way is to ...


3

Without any additional information, it is tough to provide help. Bitcoin is a decentralized network, so there is no central authority that can do something like authenticate your identity and provide access to your coins again. Understand that if you lost your ability to access the coins, they are essentially unrecoverable. Owning a bitcoin is equivalent to ...


2

What version are you on ? If you have earlier than 0.5.9 I recommend upgrading. The latest code also picks up pending transactions when you do a reset. Also, you might want to do a reset blockchain from before when you created the wallet to make sure you have all the transactions on the blockchain.


2

Yes, pretty much the only way to know coins are lost is through someone making the information public by declaring they no longer have access to the private key. Otherwise they would just look like someone who hasn't moved their coins if viewed on the blockchain. There's actually a limit at the current moment of 21 million bitcoins. So technically losing 1 ...


2

Assuming the transaction was really made and confirmed (try looking up the transaction id on a site like http://blockchain.info), and the destination address isn't one of yours, then it appears your coins have been stolen. Unfortunately, there isn't anything you can do about it, from a technical point of view; one of the features of Bitcoin is that ...


2

If you saved a copy of your wallet, I don't think you have lost your bitcoins. The bitcoin core client makes 100 addresses ahead of time (you don't have just 1 address!), and they are all stored in the wallet.dat file. Just wait until you client has finished downloading the blockchain, or follow the steps here to get them out without waiting!


2

I had the same problem. What I had to do is delete the copy of the blockchain and let the newly installed bitcoin qt download and sync from scratch. All was good after that.


2

First step: stop using that harddisk absolutely immediately. Either get a new one and start using that or make a complete image on the byte level (for example with dd in linux). Any write action you do on your current disk may overwrite your private key (assuming it hasn't already). For further steps you need to provide more info. Which bitcoin wallet were ...


2

Hi is there any way to recover my Bitcoin-Qt wallet with only an address and the wallet password? No. I can't think of a secure way for the Bitcoin developers to add recovery method like that, either. Unfortunately my disk was formatted. Do you mean that the space containing your wallet was overwritten, or that the space at the front of the disk that ...


2

Unfortunately, most of the "cloud mining" websites are ponzi schemes trying to disguise themselves as a cloud mining contract provider. This site catagorizes Bitknock as a ponzi/scam dated back to November 2015. A little bit research could have made you aware of the dangers. I personally lost dozens of bitcoin in such projects, even if I joined only the ...


2

There's already a way to burn bitcoins. You simply assign the bitcoins to an OP_RETURN. No need for the complex machinery.


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