13

Yes. The ASICs themselves only perform the SHA256 calculations, they do not deal with anything protocol related and as such can merged-mine exactly the same as existing GPU and FPGA implementations. In other words, merged mining is part of the protocol, ASICs just do the math. The standard rules of merged mining still apply, of course. The alternate ...


9

As Mikka explains, sidechains don't need to create their own currency, using bitcoins in the sidechain is precisely the point of two-way peg (there's no reason why an altchain with its own currency, like say litecoin or ethereum, couldn't support 2-way peg and also become a sidechain though). Also, take into account there's several possible ways to implement ...


8

Those running a miner against a pool don't. The pool operator would need both. As stated in the comments below, normal users of the alternate system will not need the bitcoin chain but will need the alternate chain, and normal users of bitcoin will need the bitcoin chain but not the alternate chain. Once the block is mined, nobody cares what other chains ...


6

Satoshi himself seems to be the inventor of merged mining. In his words (bitcointalk.org): I think it would be possible for BitDNS to be a completely separate network and separate block chain, yet share CPU power with Bitcoin. The only overlap is to make it so miners can search for proof-of-work for both networks simultaneously. The networks wouldn't need ...


5

There's actually a very good detailed specification on the bitcoin.it site. Essentially, what it comes down to is that there's some data inserted into the coinbase transaction of the parent chain. So, assuming, for example, that Bitcoin is the parent chain and Namecoin the child chain, anyone merge-mining would be using a coinbase transaction in Bitcoin ...


5

Found a helpful post at litecointalk: It won't work because the aux work must be explicitly provided by the merge coin. All of these coins cloned from Litecoin lack that code as Litecoin doesn't have it. As a result you cannot merge mine these coins. It is the same reason you can't merge mine Terracoin or Freicoin with Bitcoin. Freicoin considered ...


4

A 44-byte header cointaining: magic: 0xfa, 0xbe, 'm', 'm' (only required if over 20 bytes past the start of the script; optional otherwise) block_hash: Hash of the Namecoin block header merkle_size: Number of entries in aux work merkle tree. merkle_nonce: Nonce used to calculate indexes into aux work merkle tree; you may as well leave this at zero is ...


3

A side chain is a blockchain that runs parallel to the main bitcoin blockchain and can synchronize with it directly, allowing decentralized value transfer between the two chains. A user is able to essentially lock up a certain amount of coin on the main bitcoin block chain which then frees up an equivalent amount of coin on the side chain. This side chain ...


3

Yes, block 19200 was mined using MM, by slush's pool. AFAIK first Bitcoin block with merged-mining information was 00000000000002c727047296ee20b628599031c6ea5c09292513fddbb11d34df (block 148557), also mined by slush's pool.


3

The point of mining is to secure the blockchain. Before you mine, you must compose the block you are trying to find a nonce for. That block will include a transaction to pay you. If you are merged mining Bitcoin and Namecoin, you do the following: 1) You compose the Namecoin block you are trying to find a nonce for. This includes a transaction to pay you ...


3

You may want to take a look at this GitHub repo, which supports merged mining.


3

To verify the auxiliary chain, you need to prove that a certain amount of work has been done upon the latest block in that auxiliary chain. As with any form of mining, this involves computing a hash to be below a threshold. However, it doesn't matter that the pre-image of the hash has a lot of other irrelevant data in it too, so long as it contains the ...


3

The disadvantage of merged mining is the additional coin daemons you have to run in the background. They all use disk space, memory, cpu cycles and bandwidth. A more annoying issue is that most of them are no longer maintained and have bugs. You may find that they crash frequently - at least namecoind does.


3

one thing to remember in merged mining is that the block hash of the auxiliary chain (eg namecoin) does not need to be below the aux-chain threshold. rather, it is the block hash of the parent (eg bitcoin) which must be below the aux-chain (namecoin) threshold. for example, check out what happened to namecoin when merged mining was introduced in block 19200: ...


2

Most of what you need is explained at https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Merged_mining_specification When you construct the block for the primary chain (e.g. bitcoin) you need to include a merged mining header in the generation transaction (coinbase). The format of this data is explained at the URL above under "Merged mining coinbase". If, while hashing the ...


2

You will need to be running the standard client with some special configuration - server=1 along with rpcuser and rpcpassword set. After that, you need to build your pool server to communicate with it through Bitcoin API and handle everything else. Last part is not too Bitcoin-specific and will consume a lot of your development time (I would know, I tried it ...


2

with p2pool at least for the coins are 'merged' mining you cannot reconfigure them to go to any other account except for the default account of that wallet. However you may be able to work around this in one of the following ways depending on your coding ability. Monitor P2Pool logs and trigger script Watch the p2pool logs and when a block is found trigger ...


2

If you fake the bitcoin blocks, then you will be mining only namecoins and no bitcoins, so you are losing 99% of your mining income. You can't just mine at a height above the current namecoin blockchain. Remember that it is a chain. Each block has to link to the previous one. If you want to mine at namecoin height X which is thousands of blocks above the ...


2

The easiest way is to join a pool that merge mines what you want, in this case Rootstock. If you want to run your own pool, make sure the pool software supports the type of merged mining you want to do. Then set it up as described in to the documentation. Rootstock is not live yet, but many pools are testing it, so you should have several pools to choose ...


2

The Altcoin blockchain network itself needs to accept AuxPOW. Peers on the network which don't have a node which understands AuxPOW (so, all of the peers on any network) will reject your merge-mined blocks. Effectively, you'll be creating your own private fork of the Altcoin blockchain which allows AuxPOW diverging from the original blockchain at the first ...


2

You verify the auxiliary chain precisely the same way, except you must also check that the auxiliary chain's header is properly included in the parent's coinbase. From the point of view of the auxiliary chain, you can think of the entire primary chain header as part of a giant nonce.


2

You actually don't use the addresses, but the RPC info for the daemons. For example you'd start the pool with the following switches: python run_p2pool.py --net vertcoin3 --merged http://*RPCuser1*:*LongRPCpass1*@127.0.0.1:6888 --merged http://*RPCuser2*:*LongRPCpass*2@127.0.0.1:7817 You will see "Got new merged mining work!" in console as confirmation.


1

Sidechains are chains which allow 2-way peg, that is, moving bitcoins to the sidechain and then back to the main chain without trusting any third party, like you do, for example, when you move Bitcoins to say, Ripple (there you have to trust Bitstamp or another gateway). As such, there's no sidechain in existence, simply because the technology has not been ...


1

Sidechains don't mine new "sidecoins" themselves. they get funded by bitcoins being transferred to the sidechain. tx fees in the sidechains do exist, however.


1

I also do merged mining with p2pool. Keep in mind that you are essentially solo mining for namecoin and iXcoin--when another member of p2pool (not you) finds a winning share that exceeds the target difficulty for bitcoin it isn't usable by you as a winning share for the other coins. So you can't leverage the efforts of the rest of the pool to help you find ...


1

It should be possible for the parent coin protocol to prevent being used for merged mining, by eliminating the ability to populate the coinbase transaction with random data. Merged mining works because it is possible to inject a hash of an auxiliary block into a block of the parent blockchain. The coinbase block does need to contain some random data ...


1

a) no need. you can fork your chain with the new chain-id at any time. but the wallets have to know the point of fork. The spanish coin pesetacoin forked the chain near block 32000. and has no problems. c) there is (at least) one pool mergemining with 3 main chains (you have to choose one) and 4 aux chains (pesetacoin orgcoin hutercoin and usc) have a look ...


1

Yes it is possible. Thre is (at least) one spanish pool (http://manicminer.in) mergemining. You can choose to point your miner to one of 3 main chains (litecoin, dogecoin, potcoin) and you also get Pesetacoin (s spanish cryptocurrency) orgcoin , UnitedScrptCoin and huntercoin.


1

The short answer is that there are, but you can't find them because Google is doing wierd things to altcoins in the search rankings. Orgcoin www.orgcoin.org is a real coin designed to be merge mined with any scrypt chain. USC is similar in this regard as well. The primary difference is that Orgcoin is already operating in house pools for LTC, DOGE, POT ...


1

Whoever discovers the block can choose what information to put into it. Therefore a miner that finds a hash that has a sufficient level of difficulty can choose to only include transactions that actually pay their transaction fee.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible