4

No. The hardware wallet company sometimes runs a node, but you could just as easily use a client like Electrum instead, and use Electrum nodes instead with your hardware wallet. All the node is used for is checking for transactions and publishing transactions. The wallet software will use the xpub from the hardware wallet to check for payments people have ...


3

signmessage and verifymessage only work with legacy type addresses. They do not work with segwit addresses. There is ongoing work to introduce a new message signing standard that will work regardless of address type. Some discussion about why they only work on legacy addresses can be found in this issue: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/issues/10542


2

OP_CHECKSIG needs to have the whole transaction to hash and to verify the tx. Btcdeb has the feature of allowing the tx as an argument however the website you linked doesn't hence this opcode is doomed to fail every time on this website. It is reasonable to expect supplying the signature to verify the script/tx because otherwise to steal his coins, I would ...


2

Do I understand it right that every hardware wallet company like Ledger, Trezor or Shiftcrypto run a full node (e.g. bitcoind) in their company network and every hardware wallet, which is connected via the locally installed company's software at the sender's computer just sends a request to this full node like this? No. At the basic level, a hardware wallet ...


2

If I have a single UTXO of value 10,000 sats and I'm using this as an input for a Segwit tx, then when I'm ready to sign the transaction / create the witness section, I use 10,000 as the value? Or is the value the sum of the outputs that I'm sending? You use 10000 as the amount and don't care about what other inputs are or how much their value is. Where ...


2

Bitcoin transactions use DER format for the signature (plus sighash byte), but bitcoin messages use 'plain' format (aka P1363, CVC, PKCS11, Microsoft, JWS and more) (plus recovery byte). The computation of the r,s values in an ECDSA (which as Oscar correctly commented are not a point) is the same either way, but the data being signed for a message can never ...


1

Bitcoin Core > File > Sign message, then you can sign your nickname. Be careful, this signs for you address, not your coins, and anyone who can use a blockchain explorer can see to whom you send if you ever spend your coins.


1

You cannot. While both message and transaction signing use ECDSA and double sha256, signed messages slightly modify the message such that it is impossible to create a signature that works for that key in a transaction. Specifically, bitcoin signed messages are prefixed with the string Bitcoin Signed Message:\n (\n is the newline character, not literally \ ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible