23

One of the most common reasons for which miners go offline is when their profitability drops below the cost of electricity - this could either be the result of the BTC price dropping, or their local operating costs (costs including air conditioning, power, networking, hardware depreciation, etc.) rising, or the total network hashrate rising faster than they ...


5

bitcoin had more power than the top 500 supercomputers This is a nonsensical comparison. Sure, nothing compares to the aggregate of all Bitcoin miners in quickly computing the last 32 bits of the double-SHA256 hash of particularly structured 80-byte inputs. But at the same time, Bitcoin mining hardware can also literally not do anything else. It can't ...


4

No, because by design PoW is assigning relevance proportional to power usage. If the market pays N USD per day worth of BTC to miners (in subsidy + fees combined), then the mining ecosystem will converge towards spending N USD minus profit margins. Not all of those costs go to electricity (as there are also employment and hardware costs from failure and ...


4

You’re not going to get any solid answers for what is safe and possible. Mining hardware varies a lot in what the chips can actually perform at reliably, even between individual units of the same model. Overclocking mining hardware in general is a fools errand, there’s a non linear relationship between the frequency and power usage. That is, by adding 20% ...


3

Yes, both scenarios are possible. The validity of a block is determined solely by its contents, not by when it is broadcast or received, so the attacker's longer chain is equally valid whether they broadcast it as they go, or all at once. (There is an exception to this principle on testnet because of the 20-minute rule, but that's not relevant here.)


3

The security of the Bitcoin network is dependant on the financial incentives built into mining. This means that the amount of energy used to secure the network is not really important, it is the cost of that energy that is important! To make this more obvious, think about what you would need to consider when planning to majority-attack the network: how much ...


3

No, this is not possible. Energy sources are not part of the blockchain.


3

If a solution is found by a miner, does the miner have the control to which nodes is it broadcasted? Certainly, they can control the first level of peers they broadcast a solution to. However, they have no control over which peers will receive the block from the peers they have sent it to. It is in a miner's best interests to broadcast it to as many nodes ...


2

Are there any more reasons why a miner might switch off his/her system given that the complete process is automated? I can think of a few more reasons a mining operation would be disrupted, they are perhaps more rare, but possible: The miner loses access to the electricity needed to run the mining ASICs. For example, if a mining operation is capturing ...


1

I think I figured it out guys. I removed the Plexiglas off my case because I suspected my rig was overheating. No shutdowns so far, looks like I have to investigate water cooling


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