32

One of the most common reasons for which miners go offline is when their profitability drops below the cost of electricity - this could either be the result of the BTC price dropping, or their local operating costs (costs including air conditioning, power, networking, hardware depreciation, etc.) rising, or the total network hashrate rising faster than they ...


28

A device that consumes N watts of power (and doesn't output electricity or some other form of energy) will eventually produce N joules of heat per second. Thus, if your goal is converting electricity to heat, every piece of hardware that consumes electricity is 100% efficient. It's completely irrelevant what happens with that electricity before it becomes ...


11

It may be practical to use a miner to provide some of the heat for your home, bringing some miners into your home during the cooler months and moving them elsewhere during summer. It's pretty much 100% efficient at converting electric energy into heat energy. (vs. a heat pump being about 300% efficient1, moving existing heat from outdoors as well). Even a ...


6

Heat Quality Not all heat is the same. The earth maintains a fairly constant average of 10 C near the surface, but you can't boil water with that. So the temperature of your heater makes a big difference for the uses you can apply it. If you want your hot water to get to 50 C, but your ASIC miner only generates 40 C of heat, then you are in for a tepid ...


5

Are there any more reasons why a miner might switch off his/her system given that the complete process is automated? I can think of a few more reasons a mining operation would be disrupted, they are perhaps more rare, but possible: The miner loses access to the electricity needed to run the mining ASICs. For example, if a mining operation is capturing ...


5

Yes, it's a scam. Don't send them anything.


4

Can a bitcoin miner be a good subtitute to a modern heather with the same power consumption ? A Bitcoin mining rig lacks certain features that are fairly desirable in a room heater. The main one is a thermostat. Even if it did, this would mean you would have to throttle back your Bitcoin miner as the room reaches some desired temperature. You would also ...


4

Yes. Bitcoin Core has a RPC submitblock, which, as the name implies, allows you to provide a block to be submitted to the Bitcoin network. In fact, Bitcoin Core supports the getblocktemplate protocol which means you can solo mine with Bitcoin Core. Furthermore, pools are probably running Bitcoin Core in their backend and their pool software just uses the ...


3

If a solution is found by a miner, does the miner have the control to which nodes is it broadcasted? Certainly, they can control the first level of peers they broadcast a solution to. However, they have no control over which peers will receive the block from the peers they have sent it to. It is in a miner's best interests to broadcast it to as many nodes ...


3

Yes, it is possible to use the waste heat of a bitcoin miner (or any other computing device or other machinery) to heat your living space. The plan has some drawbacks and limitations: The temperature: These devices are efficient when they get like ~20C at the inlet and heat air to less than 40C. Trying to make them work at higher temperature may limit their ...


2

Solo Miners Is one transaction only picked by one miner or is it possible, that more miners can pick the same transaction? Each miner is free to pick whichever transactions they want. They have no knowledge of what other miners are working on. Miners might pick different transactions, some the same and some different or all the same. There is no explicit ...


1

If you found yourself in a situation where you owned a machine which, when running, would create a profit for you, what would you do? run that machine set up a business to rent the profits of running that machine to others The only way the second choice really makes sense, is if you rent it out for more money than you'd expect the machine to make for you ...


1

Does anyone have suggestions on what I can do to get my miners running? US split-phase homes are likely to already have a 220V outlet somewhere for high-powered appliances (laundry washers, etc). You need to be sure the miner's PSU is designed for split-phase and not single-phase because the earthing/ground arrangements differ. An electrician can create a ...


1

BrtH's answer is 100% correct, but does assume you don't need the waste heat. If you're already using electric heat (not heat pump, actual dumping of electricity through resistors) or gas heating at comparable prices to heat your dwelling space (perhaps because the ambient temperature outside is so low that heat pump can't operate; if it can work you'd be ...


1

First of all, let's make costs clear. If power is extremely cheap for you (perhaps you make your own or have surplus from self-generated solar/wind), and you properly cool your GPU so that it does not burn itself out, then you MIGHT get a tiny amount of BTC from mining with a rig. Nice Hash gives you about $1.78 per day for renting out an Nvidia 1080 Ti, so ...


1

Both are computational units. Algorithms are typically written without making assumptions about underlying chips that are going to run those algorithms, but certain type of tasks can benefit from massive parallel processing that GPUs, which increases GPUs appeal in mining, machine learning, etc. https://blogs.nvidia.com/blog/2009/12/16/whats-the-difference-...


1

I think I figured it out guys. I removed the Plexiglas off my case because I suspected my rig was overheating. No shutdowns so far, looks like I have to investigate water cooling


1

You yourself have stated that your boards are failing to hash. It looks like some form of system test against the boards is failing. I know I am being captain obvious here. chain[6]: some chip cores are not opened FAILED! Test Patten on chain[6]: FAILED! Until you can find the point of failure with a volt meter, or replace the failing boards. You can try ...


1

If you can make them fit they have PCI full ribbon cables.depending on the algo/ coin you need lanes. I researched/found this because I was building a folding coin rig which is more computational but it does help with mining.


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