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The resolution of the timestamp in a Bitcoin block header is one second. However, if a miner should find a valid proof-of-work and create a valid block, they do not have to wait one second before starting work on a new block. It is perfectly legal for two successive blocks to have identical timestamps. In fact, it is legal for the succeeding block to have ...


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Simple question really, considering theres a very small group of miners controlling the chain ATM. Miners are distributed around the world, many of them may join the same mining pool to even out the variance in payouts though. Do not confuse the number of mining pools for the number of miners. Really, it is not possible to know the number of distinct mining ...


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What you are describing is a majority attack which a miner own more than 51% of the hashing power, it has happened once in 2014 but the miner then decided to lower its power to allow the bitcoin to work as intended, you should also notice that the things a miner owning this power can do is limited, see this answer: https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/a/662/...


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If you want to move all your computational power (hash power) suppose you could just disconnect from your current pool and connect to the other one If you want to divide between different pool I suppose you could just connect to them then use a tactic of process priority to choose how much power you want to devote to each pool depending on its process, for ...


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It is very hard to find the correct answer but verifying the answer is instant and you need that answer to begin to mine the next block, so as soon as a miner receives one answer that he can verify is valid he will take that information and use it to try to find the next answer without loosing time and because every other miner will do the same.


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