4

The amount for the block reward is what is created, there is no additional created for any reason. If the block reward is 6.25 BTC, that is exactly what the miner is paid, and nobody else.


3

Yes. Bitcoin Core has a RPC submitblock, which, as the name implies, allows you to provide a block to be submitted to the Bitcoin network. In fact, Bitcoin Core supports the getblocktemplate protocol which means you can solo mine with Bitcoin Core. Furthermore, pools are probably running Bitcoin Core in their backend and their pool software just uses the ...


1

When a pool issues work to a miner, it is typically for a lower difficulty than the network difficulty. This allows the miner to solve a block header for the lower difficulty and submit it to the pool. These submitted headers are known as shares. Even though most shares will not be valid for the network, having miners submit shares allows the pool to track ...


1

No. The difficulty roughly means your miners finding a single nonce that results in a block hash that starts with a certain number of zeros. The Bitcoin network requires a very high difficulty. Of course, it is unlikely any of your miners will actually generate the hash that the Bitcoin network wants. So, instead, you sign up to a mining pool. However, the ...


1

The "difficulty" being given to miners by a pool is used for tracking if the miner is doing useful work that could possibly result in a block, paying out the miner accordingly. The number of attempts a second, the overall income, and the resulting probability of solving a block are unchanged.


1

Yes, it does. Pools help reduce the variance in payouts, but aggregated over all your miners, it needs to have enough hashrate to at least find a block occasionally.


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