30

Stale shares are the shares that were sent after a block was already solved, that is to say, they were sent late and were no longer valid. To avoid stale shares, best to have a reasonably fast mining rig (so you won't take too long to calculate a share, probably not a problem for most machines), reliable internet connection (stable, not necessarily fast), ...


22

A stale share occurs when you find a share and submit it to the mining pool after the pool has already moved on to the next block. The percentage of stale shares should be very low if everything's working correct, around 2 out of 1,000 shares or so. Several factors affect the stale share rate. The three most important are long polling, pool load, and miner-...


21

Yes, you can use a Bitcoin mining rig to heat your home. Whether or not it's worth doing depends on a number of things, such as: Whether you have a heat pump, or would otherwise install a heat pump (they generally give you 3kW of heat for around 1kW of electricity) Whether of not you have other heating that is more cost effective than electric heating (eg ...


9

The above answers are good but one thing I would add is that hashing rate affect stale share %. Why? Because with a faster miner a smaller % of shares are even "at risk" of being stale. Pools only pay for completed shares. A block is found on average every 10 minutes so in that 10 minute window the last share is the one at risk of being stale. Now the ...


7

Yes and no. As far as FPGAs are concerned, I see no reason why you should not, technically, be able to handle a getwork on one of these and pass the work units to one or more FPGAs via USB. These units do not, however, have a PCIe slot nor do they have any connectors which, to my knowledge, are capable of connecting to an external PCIe enclosure box, so ...


5

The JSON-RPC interface is a way for other programs to interact with Bitcoin-Qt or bitcoind while it's running. It's useful for doing things like mining or building a web site that needs to talk to the Bitcoin network directly. Most users don't need to worry about it or set it up.


5

This is a question of efficiency regarding MH/s. Simply, I would like to know which is better It doesn't matter. Every hash has an equal probability of finding a block. However, that being said, there's some hidden teeth: Putting graphics cards together will make them harder to cool. Putting them in multiple computers will use more electricity - all ...


5

There isn't a single "standard" for residential circuits in the U.S. but there might be a typical circuit, such as 20 amps. As far as plug connections, don't use light-duty extension cords; make sure they are rated for high amperage, say 20amps. Generally if you are plugging directly into an outlet then the total power drawn can be done safely up to 80% (...


5

They do indeed perform exactly the same Crossfire is not encouraged as it gives no advantage and may impact your overall performance. The computation is done in parallel on each card so there is no need for them to communicate among each other.


5

You need a PCI Express (PCI-e) x1 to x16 Riser adaptor cable like this one: http://www.trademe.co.nz/computers/cables-adaptors/other/auction-670675802.htm Bear in mind that some graphics cards draw a lot of power, and I've seen photos of cables that have overheated because they couldn't handle the load. The linked one above may have solved this issue by ...


4

You don't need a wallet if you are mining at a pool. The coins are kept at your account in their website and you can use them from there. If you want to transfer them to your computer, then yes, you need to download the bitcoin client which automatically creates a wallet for you. If you are solo mining (which is not recommended unless you have lots of GPUs) ...


4

The wallet doesn't have to be on the same computer. For example, you can mine in a pool and the address to receive bitcoins could be from any wallet located anywhere.


4

Doing it that way for an FPGA or ASIC would be very easy, once you have the FPGA or ASIC. All you need to talk to an FPGA or ASIC is a USB port and the software required is very simple. You would need a PC somewhere to act as the mining controller. Of course, if you're mining in a pool, the pool provides the controller, so no issues there. Using a GPU is a ...


4

With the advent of ASICs, Bitcoin GPU mining is no longer profitable. I would recommend mining a Scrypt coin such as Dogecoin or Litecoin. (You can then trade it in for Bitcoin on an exchange, if you prefer.) To answer your original question, yes, you can use one card for mining and the other for actually running the computer.


3

You can actually pick up a PCI to PCI-E 1x (open end) adapter and plug in any video card you want. Then use a PCI-E 1x to 16x adapter. This is an example, but there are cheaper ones out there. http://www.quill.com/startech-pci-cards/cbs/352874.html?cm_mmc=SEM_PLA_T_352874


3

First the bad news: your Motherboard appears not to have a PCI-E Slot, which is required to fit any modern GPU. On the other hand for the price of a single GPU you can order more than 1 ASIC miner with lower power consumption, i.e., cheaper to run, and more computational power. I'd wait until the first ones actually ship, though.


3

I have to say you did not research Bitcoin mining enough. Mining on a GPU is obsolete, reports say ASIC-based mining devices with x40 the performance have already started shipping.


3

From what I know, you can connect basically any amount of FPGA cards to one computer through USB hubs. Case in point:


3

ASICs might make a data furnace idea easier since they take up much less space to generate high hash rates per watt. The Block Erupter USB project puts an ASIC in a powered USB stick package. Imagine a series of these ASICs coupled to a standard home baseboard radiator heat sink and controlled by a low power Rasberry Pi computer with Wifi to the net. As ...


3

I live in Florida so it's not very cold but when it does dip down I just start mining :D and tuck myself into bed! By the way, most people have to pay for electricity to heat their homes anyway so the fact you get Bitcoins is just an added bonus to the mining-for-heating!


3

Mining on a GPU, especially on less powerful ones like the ones found in laptops is highly inefficient. You can find out exactly how much you can potentially earn or lose from various Bitcoin calculators, like mine for example. If you are worried about overheating your laptop and just want to test what mining is all about, you could also lower your hashrate,...


3

to determine if they're being detected properly, use the 'lsusb' command. Here's what they should look like if your system is detecting them properly (I run mine in a VM running Ubuntu: $ sudo lsusb [sudo] password for majorminer: Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0e0f:0003 VMware, Inc. Virtual Mouse Bus 002 Device 003: ID 0e0f:0002 VMware, Inc. Virtual USB Hub Bus ...


3

It largely depends on what machine you want to power with those solar panels. You're definitely going nowhere with GPU based mining. As PCs consume a huge lot of energy, and those who don't, are equipped with Atom and Intel graphics, meaning mining won't get you far with that equipment. However, it may be possible to run a USB ASIC miner based on a ...


3

The specifications of the computer between the internet and the miners has to be fast enough to handle all the communication between both, but other than that, any extra capacity will remain unused by this host computer. A Pentium 4 might be enough if you run a Linux OS, but if you plan on using Windows 7 or higher, it will not be fast enough. Using a ...


3

USB ASIC miners require some sort of control program that sends work to the miners and collects the results. You set them up in that control program. BFGMiner is one such program.


3

Currently, all mining software have GPU and CPU mining disabled by default. You're going to need to recompile from source and enable CPU/GPU mining to be able to mine with your CPU/GPU. You should be warned that this is not profitable in any way, shape, or form and that even on testnet, your CPU won't likely find a block for many hours. That said, if you're ...


2

As a general rule of thumb, a domestic circuit has a lower or zero 'standing charge' but much higher charge per unit than a 'light industrial' one. A friend of mine was a keen pottery enthusiast and owned a small business make and selling pots at craft fairs. He had the electrical company install a second meter and circuit (in his house) to run his ...


2

What other safety precautions should I take? Surge protection and proper grounding Insurance (either house, rental, or business should cover mining equipment) Plan for floods, earthquakes, tornadoes, etc. if applicable


2

Reading this in 2017 with a chuckle. The Pi is pretty much the defacto controller due to its low cost and energy use. I have one running an ASIC over USB with cgminer, compiled on the Pi. Some of Bitmain's Antminers use Beaglebone Blacks (TI?), I'm not sure why. I'm in a Debian ARM mailing list and there are more little ARM machines than I can count. ...


2

You need whats called a Power Filter. There are varying levels of filters, some cut the tops off of AC signals, others take dirty input current and consume it, then create a completely new AC signal for device use. The C2 is a good intro, but if you want superior protection, look for something called a Power Conditioner. Here are links to the current ...


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