5

You need a PCI Express (PCI-e) x1 to x16 Riser adaptor cable like this one: http://www.trademe.co.nz/computers/cables-adaptors/other/auction-670675802.htm Bear in mind that some graphics cards draw a lot of power, and I've seen photos of cables that have overheated because they couldn't handle the load. The linked one above may have solved this issue by ...


5

The JSON-RPC interface is a way for other programs to interact with Bitcoin-Qt or bitcoind while it's running. It's useful for doing things like mining or building a web site that needs to talk to the Bitcoin network directly. Most users don't need to worry about it or set it up.


4

With the advent of ASICs, Bitcoin GPU mining is no longer profitable. I would recommend mining a Scrypt coin such as Dogecoin or Litecoin. (You can then trade it in for Bitcoin on an exchange, if you prefer.) To answer your original question, yes, you can use one card for mining and the other for actually running the computer.


3

You can actually pick up a PCI to PCI-E 1x (open end) adapter and plug in any video card you want. Then use a PCI-E 1x to 16x adapter. This is an example, but there are cheaper ones out there. http://www.quill.com/startech-pci-cards/cbs/352874.html?cm_mmc=SEM_PLA_T_352874


3

ASICs might make a data furnace idea easier since they take up much less space to generate high hash rates per watt. The Block Erupter USB project puts an ASIC in a powered USB stick package. Imagine a series of these ASICs coupled to a standard home baseboard radiator heat sink and controlled by a low power Rasberry Pi computer with Wifi to the net. As ...


3

The amount of data required for a standard rig isn't very high. There are a few things that I would suggest if you are having issues. Don't use wifi if possible. Connect your rig directly to your network with an ethernet cable. Connect to the closest mining pool. Ping different pools and use the closest one. The lower the time the better. Make sure your ...


3

to determine if they're being detected properly, use the 'lsusb' command. Here's what they should look like if your system is detecting them properly (I run mine in a VM running Ubuntu: $ sudo lsusb [sudo] password for majorminer: Bus 002 Device 002: ID 0e0f:0003 VMware, Inc. Virtual Mouse Bus 002 Device 003: ID 0e0f:0002 VMware, Inc. Virtual USB Hub Bus ...


3

It largely depends on what machine you want to power with those solar panels. You're definitely going nowhere with GPU based mining. As PCs consume a huge lot of energy, and those who don't, are equipped with Atom and Intel graphics, meaning mining won't get you far with that equipment. However, it may be possible to run a USB ASIC miner based on a ...


3

The specifications of the computer between the internet and the miners has to be fast enough to handle all the communication between both, but other than that, any extra capacity will remain unused by this host computer. A Pentium 4 might be enough if you run a Linux OS, but if you plan on using Windows 7 or higher, it will not be fast enough. Using a ...


3

USB ASIC miners require some sort of control program that sends work to the miners and collects the results. You set them up in that control program. BFGMiner is one such program.


3

Currently, all mining software have GPU and CPU mining disabled by default. You're going to need to recompile from source and enable CPU/GPU mining to be able to mine with your CPU/GPU. You should be warned that this is not profitable in any way, shape, or form and that even on testnet, your CPU won't likely find a block for many hours. That said, if you're ...


2

Reading this in 2017 with a chuckle. The Pi is pretty much the defacto controller due to its low cost and energy use. I have one running an ASIC over USB with cgminer, compiled on the Pi. Some of Bitmain's Antminers use Beaglebone Blacks (TI?), I'm not sure why. I'm in a Debian ARM mailing list and there are more little ARM machines than I can count. ...


2

This would be approximately true, if: Your regular heating system is a resistive electrical heater. (Not gas or oil, not a heat pump.) Your mining rig produces no more heat than is needed to heat your house at any given time. (This may be false for people with lots of hardware, or living in warm climates. Note also that your heating needs may be much ...


2

A single instance of cgminer handles multiple GPUs, so there is no need to run separate processes. Enabling SLI(You aren't using NVIDIA cards, right...) or Crossfire will decrease mining performance, so leave it off. There is no overhead associated with running multiple GPUs on a single system, unless the cards are physically spaced so close together that ...


2

Theoretically you should see a net saving in electricity consumption for there ought to be some economies of scale in having a single motherboard with the 4 cards vs. 2 separate motherbs. each with 2 cards each. The CPUs controlling such cards are consuming power themselves but such consumption doesn't get much bigger if you have 1, 2 or 4 cards in the same ...


2

The hardware of the controller doesn't matter. You can run cgminer on a Raspberry Pi or a TP-Link router, both are terribly weak and it has absolutely no effect on the ASIC whatsoever. To this end, even KNC mining rigs use Beaglebone Black boards to control their top of the range miners. Most home miners use Raspberry Pi due to their low cost and easy to run ...


2

I have found that the cheapest way to hold many cards is to put them in old motherboards. I have been buying motherboards off Ebay for $45, getting a $5 processor, a $100 PSU and connecting 4 cards per rig. I currently have 6 of these rigs running and they are great. As for heating I have built custom cases for my cards so they don't overheat. Using this ...


2

Nope, you're good to go. You don't even have to connect them all through PCI-e. With cgminer, you can set the settings uniquely for each card. You can use any kind of adapter that would normally bottleneck GPU performance.


2

With solo mining, all you need to get from the Internet is the latest block. Since these come once every 2.5 minutes (average) and are at most 250 KB (typically ~10 KB), you should be just fine. You'd also want to get all the latest Litecoin network traffic in order to validate all the transactions you can, but that'd be pretty small, like the blocks. You ...


2

You need to use cgminer-3.7.2 or earlier. For some reason, GPU mining was removed from subsequent versions. Cgminer is the best available miner for your purposes. Con Kolivas is one of the world's great programmers, and we are lucky to be able to use his software. Please also be sure to read the file SCRYPT-README to get reasonable performance.


2

Yes. If you use a 12V/2A power supply rather than a 12V/5A supply, the voltage will drop, causing hardware errors. You will effectively be undervolting the chips.


2

A solution, but still not optimal for me, is on a Bitcoin Forum posting. The server grade HP DPS-800GBA connectors are completely incompatible with FCI PWRLOPRO connector that my existing server-grade PFE1100-12-054RA PSUs connect to. Wound up canabalizing the Coolmax ATX cables. Only needed to solder the ends of the cables to prep them for crimping into ...


2

Is it possible to start Bitcoin mining using an iPhone with 4G internet connection? Yes. It is theoretically possible to start mining with an iPhone. Your internet connection is almost completely irrelevant and your space is also not important. The important thing is the power of your CPU. But: Mining with an iPhone means mining with CPU. And that's ...


1

The cpu is not used while mining and thus should not bottleneck your setup. The only impact that I could see would be bootup times, and it shouldn't be significant.


1

Your settings look good. If it was working OK with same settings for a while, then started acting up, either you have a software upgrade that's causing issues, or (more likely) you have a new/developing hardware issue. I had one doing the exact same thing last week (would run for a few hours and then reboot). I ended up reloading the os and then from ...


1

My 7850 has very similar characteristics. 1250Mhz works the best. I doubt there is a formula as my 7870 is much happier with 1500Mhz. Remember that video memory has error correction. Sometimes is can run quite high with lots of errors which will reduce your performance.


1

What i'm wondering is how many PSU's would I will need and what kind is recommended? I would recommend much higher PSU, at least 1000 Watt PSU for each two Radeon's R9 290x. This is based on some recommendations I found (here and here). I am 99.99% confident a single 750 Watt PSU will NOT be able to cover 6 GPUs of that power. I also think the ...


1

I have one computer with windows 8.1 13.11 driver and a 280x which gets 720KHS and another computer with the same setup which gets 620KHS. They have a different cpu ram and psu (both have quality ones). How can this be? It's because they have a different ram. With scrypt mining RAM is of up most importance. The faster/higher quality the ram, ...


1

I don't think it will make a difference. If you are using the Anker 10-port "power bar" style USB hub (that's what it sounds like you have, based on your description of it + the fact that this hub is very commonly used with USB bitcoin miners), that is a pretty robust hub. One of my mining rigs (which doubles as my media center) has 8 block erupters + USB ...


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