7

Ideally you shouldn't share any words and brute forcing with one paper in your case may take time but still possible. Also if someone gets one paper he can try social engineering to get another. Below links might help in understanding things involved in brute forcing. https://medium.com/@johncantrell97/how-i-checked-over-1-trillion-mnemonics-in-30-hours-to-...


6

No, I don't think the checksum should be removed or made optional. It doesn't do more harm that good. Bip39 is a simple way to copy computer-generated randomness from the computer onto, eg a piece of paper. This Bip39 mnemonic sentence can then be used to restore your wallet, should you lose your computer. The checksum provides some degree of certainty on ...


6

No your funds would still be at risk. There are only a few popular wallets that use seed phrases. Most wallets use BIP39(https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Seed_phrase) but there are some that use different versions or no seed words at all. Electrum does not ouse BIP39, see their docs explaining why. https://electrum.readthedocs.io/en/latest/seedphrase.html It would ...


5

Because no one has stepped up to do the work or hire someone to do it for them. That's how open source works : ) This repository contains the mnemonic list in different languages (Currently just 8). There are also wordlists in other languages that are stuck in limbo. However if you find it to be worth it, you might want to prepare a list and submit it to the ...


5

Other answers correctly state that leaking 16 words of a 24 word key significantly compromises security. I would add that you have an alternative option which wouldn't compromise security. Using Shamir's Secret Sharing, you can encode your key on three separate pieces of paper such that: You need at least two pieces of paper to recover the original key If ...


5

Andreas Antonpoulos answers this question here. He calls this reduction from 256 bit entropy to 80 bit entropy a "catastrophic reduction in security". He estimates that it would take a cluster of machines up to a decade to brute force the remaining 8 words. It is certainly not an effective long term wealth storage solution. Perhaps it could work as ...


5

Can I “duplicate” a wallet using a backup phrase (12 words)? Yes Where is my balance stored? Both wallets will scan the relevant parts of the public transaction-journal ("blockchain") to add up the amount of money controlled by the keys derived from your backup phrase - this total is your balance. Wallets are very likely to store this total ...


4

No, this is not possible. The mnemonic and passphrase are put through PBKDF2. Any change in the input results in a completely different output. While it is possible that there exists some 12 word mnemonic that just happens to hash to the same seed as your original mnemonic + passphrase, this would require bruteforcing all possible mnemonics to discover, and ...


4

You can't. Bitcoin Core is not BIP39 compliant.


4

Do I have such a recovery seed? No. Bitcoin Core does not use mnemonics nor is the seed exportable. Is there any other way I can migrate my wallet to the trezor? (Other than creating a new wallet and transferring funds from the existing one to this new one) No. The only way to migrate is to send a transaction that transfers your Bitcoin to your Trezor. ...


3

Any wallet software that allows restoring from a BIP39 mnemonic will allow you to do that, such as Electrum. However, you should not do this on your regular computer, since putting your private key on your computer defeats the purpose of having a hardware wallet. If you really have to verify your key is correct, and you'd like to maintain the security of ...


3

Generally, yes, mnemonic phrase contains enough data for software wallets to derive the keys. With the caveat. Some software wallets imports are supporting only 12 word or 24 word combinations. Some support different BIPs and thus path derivation schemes (32/44/84) by default, and some only single one of them. Some have additional feature for a specific seed ...


3

How to get my 24 word seed using bitcoin-cli You write about getting but your commands are about setting. This is confusing. You can't get a seed-phrase from Bitcoin-core. You can use the sethdseed function to "Set or generate a new HD wallet seed." this marks any existing private keys as inactive (which may or may not be what you want). Note that ...


3

Not having a checksum means that users would be able to easily pick their own mnemonic seed phrase in a non-random way, and that presents a really huge security risk to those users! While it would also enable easier provable physical entropy gathering methods, this enabling of extremely poor entropy seed phrases could likely be of huge detriment to naive ...


2

Kalle Rosenbaum argued for this on Twitter. The checksum is between 4 (for 12 words) and 8 (24 words) bits. This is a very weak checksum. For 12 words, this would mean 1/16 probability of failure to detect a mistyped sequence of VALID words! The words themselves are a much stronger checksum. Any misspelled word has a much higher probability to be detected ...


2

This is not possible. The seed words are converted to the hex seed through a process involving a one way hashing operation - it is not possible to go the other way. That said, as long as your hex seed is the tree root, keeping that safely would allow you to access all your coins, although it would make importing it into a wallet somewhat difficult.


2

There are at least three practical tools implementing Shamir Secret Sharing with BIP39 mnemonics: https://github.com/iancoleman/slip39/ https://github.com/unchained-capital/hermit https://github.com/trezor/python-shamir-mnemonic/


2

Above answers regarding seedrecover.py and BIP39 are wrong. Blockchain.info legacy wallets can use any number of words from 15 to 21 or more. The number of words changes depending on your password length. The words are NOT a part of the BIP39 seed words and seedrecover.py will NOT be able to find the missing words as it is based on a completly different ...


2

Disclaimer: there may exist software that does all of this automatically for you, but I'm going to provide a quick walk-through of the steps, which will allow you to compute this manually. If you only need to recover the last word, then you're in luck, as there are only a small number of possibilities for what that last word could be. The Bip-39 word list ...


2

The idea behind a seed mnemonic phrase is to provide a readable format for the seed. It is mostly used for backup purposes. Let's say you lost your phone. You'll be able to recover your bitcoin wallet based on the word list you have saved in a secure place. Also the Trust Wallet may stop being available as an app at some point, and the seed will allow you to ...


2

You have reduced the level of security by making it so that an adversary only needs to figure out your three-word phrase rather than your 24-word phrase. Assuming 170,000 English words from which you derive your phrase, your three-word phrase only has 52 bits of entropy. In practice, it will probably be less than this because your set of words may not be ...


2

if I happen to get my 12-words compromised and someone gets to know them, then I would be still safe as long as this person does not figure out which wallet app I used? Technically, no. The attacker only needs to figure out the algorithm used to convert the passphrase into the public key, which may be used by multiple apps. But that is probably not what you ...


2

The order is important. If you have 24 different words but don't know the order, you have to try up to 24 factorial permutations. That is around 620448401733239439360000 different attempts. This may take a very long time and cause you great anxiety, unhappiness and self-recrimination. Related questions: Unsure order of 12 word mnemonic Bruteforcing a seed ...


2

Sadly if you lost your seed phrase (12 or 24 words) you won't be able to regenerate your private key and get your funds control back. Best advice, look harder where you wrote it or stored it. PS. Never write your seed phrase in any online place or take any picture, just piece of paper very well stored.


1

If you are certain that the 12 words are the correct words but merely in the wrong order, and you know the addresses from the wallet, it is possible to brute force: there are 479,001,600 possible combinations, which isn't too many. Here is an example of a tool that can help you with this: https://github.com/3rdIteration/btcrecover/blob/master/docs/...


1

The SHA-256 hash of the hex string is 5355d54a3d673c4b1ac20b839ead09af3c6fea6dc24199b477f6ff64e7a68262. The first 4 bits of that are represented by the first hex character, 5, which in binary is 0101. You need to take the shasum of the raw binary, not the hex string: $ echo "...


1

A single mnemonic seed phrase can be used to derive many different addresses, either via different derivation paths, different address types, etc. It may often be possible to create multiple instances of the same wallet using different software, but the two wallet applications you've mentioned have nuanced operation and likely use different derivation ...


1

The BIP39 English wordlist contains 2048 entries so, since words can be repeated, you need to try (corrected) 2048 ^ 4 combinations which is 117,592,186,044,416 different phrases to try. If you could test a million guesses a second, that would take up to 204 days. The first stage of testing would be that the checksum condition is met. This ought to be fast. ...


1

SSH is a generic protocol within which a user can deploy keys from a variety of algorithms, one of which is ECDSA (same as Bitcoin signatures). The Ledger hardware wallet even has an application for its devices to perform SSH signatures using keys derived from the same seed used for cryptocurrencies. TLS also has EC available as an algorithm so there might ...


1

I'm sorry to hear of your loss. Recovering the funds will require some careful work, but go slowly and make sure you understand what you're doing, and you'll find it isn't that hard! Importantly: Be very wary going forward - lots of scammers will likely attempt to prey upon you and steal your funds! DO NOT share the 12 words or 34 letter string with anybody ...


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