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First, a word of caution: unlike how it's advertised, Samourai is not a privacy wallet, so be prepared to give up your privacy, which defeats the point of using Wasabi. Samourai sends your xpub - which is your past, present and future financial history - to their servers, which retroactively deanonymizes the coinjoins you did with Wasabi in the past. ...


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A single mnemonic seed phrase can be used to derive many different addresses, either via different derivation paths, different address types, etc. It may often be possible to create multiple instances of the same wallet using different software, but the two wallet applications you've mentioned have nuanced operation and likely use different derivation ...


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I created a python script to try exactly this. Check it out here: https://github.com/SachinMeier/MnemonicRecovery There is certainly no guarantee that this will work, and it's definitely not optimized for speed yet, but if you're only missing four words, it might just work. Currently, it only supports P2PKH addresses. You'll also need to install a virtual ...


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The BIP39 English wordlist contains 2048 entries so, since words can be repeated, you need to try (corrected) 2048 ^ 4 combinations which is 117,592,186,044,416 different phrases to try. If you could test a million guesses a second, that would take up to 204 days. The first stage of testing would be that the checksum condition is met. This ought to be fast. ...


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SSH is a generic protocol within which a user can deploy keys from a variety of algorithms, one of which is ECDSA (same as Bitcoin signatures). The Ledger hardware wallet even has an application for its devices to perform SSH signatures using keys derived from the same seed used for cryptocurrencies. TLS also has EC available as an algorithm so there might ...


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In fact, A mnemonic derived of Raw binary @256 bits using all 1's would be as follows. zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo zoo vote ...


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Yes, you could write a simple little program that would iterate through all the possible combinations and generate the address for each one. If you know the address then you could simply compare the generated addresses until it finds the one that matches. If you don't know the address then yes you will need to look on-chain to find the one that has a non-...


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