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3

who store the private key adresses of these seed phrases, The private-keys are generated from the seed-phrase by a mathematical function. There is no need to store a list of seed-phrases and corresponding private-keys. I suppose it is the wallet software provider No, you should be the only person to know or store your seed-phrase. Ideally it should not ...


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The private keys are not stored, they are deterministically generated from the seed data. The seed encodes up to 256 bits of random entropy in a human readable form with a checksum attached to it. These details are outlined in BIP39 This entropy is then passed through the PBKDF2 hash function in order to produce a master private key and a chaining key, ...


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Do you know one of the addresses in the keychain? Ledger uses BIP44 derivation so you could write a loop to check different seed phrases and check the resulting addresses against an address you know that should be in the keychain. This way you can type in your recovery words without having to be online. For example if it were me I'd probably write ...


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To derive the private key, you need to have this information before - whether the mnemonic is used purely as BIP39 or is further used to generate HD wallet using BIP32/BIP49/BIP84. The retrieval process differs for each of the above possibilities. If the mnemonic is used purely as BIP39, that is a Bitcoin address is generated directly from the randomly ...


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As already suggested the best option is to try the Seed Recovery script from btcrecover. You just need to run the python script, which will ask you for the words you know (those eleven words) and then you also need one of these two: An address that you know it is from the wallet you are trying to recover. A full node running on your computer so the script ...


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As already suggested you should try the Seed Recover script.


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