7

Namecoin was the first fork from Bitcoin, and is a blockchain based peer-to-peer network which maintains a decentral ledger of registered names. It is the convention, that when you register a Namecoin name starting with d/ that appropriate DNS resolution software would translate this information to a .bit address. E.g. d/myself would be resolved to myself....


5

Well, the fact that it will be possible to implement features similar to Namecoin that it will become obsolete. Bitcoin is intended as a currency and a payment system, while Namecoin is designed specifically as a DNS provider for .bit domain names. The fact that Namecoin would be able to handle .com domain names, doesn't mean the currently employed ...


5

So the whole point of a name reg contract is not to send transactions, rather its sole purpose is to build up a database which other nodes can then query. Ethereum smart contracts have immutable storage. This means that you can prove your primacy to a specific name, and other people can then reference that as part of a database. What it comes down to is ...


3

The point of mining is to secure the blockchain. Before you mine, you must compose the block you are trying to find a nonce for. That block will include a transaction to pay you. If you are merged mining Bitcoin and Namecoin, you do the following: 1) You compose the Namecoin block you are trying to find a nonce for. This includes a transaction to pay you ...


3

Yes. So that the whole world can see it? Yes seems like a good idea. The NameCoin block-chain is public, although you could encrypt it in the NameCoin chain, but why there? If you are scared to lose any privates keys you should work on your back-upping strategies, not uploading it to the public domain in the hope none will realize it is a ECDSA Bitcoin ...


3

Clients only need to track the currently valid information (there is an expiry date for domains, for example) and not all applications need all of the data stored in the chain. So, much like Bitcoin itself, application specific versions of the information stored in the blockchain will be used by most applications and they can use SCIP or distributed trust ...


3

You have enough to reserve the name (the .01 network fee) but then not enough to pay the transaction fee. If you wait a day or so for the coins to age, it might work.


2

with p2pool at least for the coins are 'merged' mining you cannot reconfigure them to go to any other account except for the default account of that wallet. However you may be able to work around this in one of the following ways depending on your coding ability. Monitor P2Pool logs and trigger script Watch the p2pool logs and when a block is found trigger ...


2

Bitcoins and Namecoins can be mined at the same time, because the underlying algorithm is the same. But you can not mine Litecoin and Bitcoin at the same time without the loss of hashes/sec, because it uses different crypto algorithms. Therefore I highly doubt that there is something like you have claimed in your question. BTW, there is a pool where you can ...


2

I'd check out the python library Coinkit - it's for generating cryptocurrency wallets (Bitcoin, Namecoin, Litecoin, Peercoin, Primecoin, Dogecoin and a bunch of others are currently supported). Just do "pip install coinkit".


2

No. This feature does not exist (yet) in Namecoin.


2

If you fake the bitcoin blocks, then you will be mining only namecoins and no bitcoins, so you are losing 99% of your mining income. You can't just mine at a height above the current namecoin blockchain. Remember that it is a chain. Each block has to link to the previous one. If you want to mine at namecoin height X which is thousands of blocks above the ...


2

At the time of asking, this functionality wasn't supported in Namecoin. I've written a patch that adds this and a few other properties to Namecoin's getblock RPC call. https://github.com/namecoin/namecoin/issues/87 https://gist.github.com/ryancdotorg/5e610e9ee546beed367d


2

Meanwhile I've answered this question at reddit. You have already taken the first 2 out of 3 steps necessary for your wallet migration: (1) cleaned up the data directory that contained old incompatible files, (2) dumped and imported the private keys from the old wallet (alternatively, depending on how old the wallet is, one could try starting the new ...


2

Namecoin has not strayed from Bitcoin in this parameter, it is still set at a 1 MB block size limit. You can find it in main.h: /** The maximum allowed size for a serialized block, in bytes (network rule) */ static const unsigned int MAX_BLOCK_SIZE = 1000000;


2

Easy answer: No, you can't register a *.com domain with namecoin. That would be like asking if you can print dollars with bitcoin. Nope. But what you can do is start your own namespace with namecoin. The namespace d/ stands for bitdomains. So if you wanted to register a bitdomain named "bitdomain.bit" you would register d/bitdomain (Notice that you don'...


2

I realize that this is a very old question, but I think it makes sense to give an update nevertheless. Recently, a port of the Qt-UI for Bitcoin has been done also for Namecoin. It provides full support also for name operations and even configuring domains directly without the need to come up with the correct JSON strings. The new Namecoin-Qt is available ...


2

The only way to get the domain name on the ENS is to win at the target name auction. So there is no need to hide the name. ENS uses the name hash for converting arbitrary length string into bytes32.


1

Unfortunately you didn't provide enough information: Which OS? Version number of your Namecoin server? Does this Namecoin server run on your local machine? If not, how is it connected physically? Did you apply any command line params when starting the server? What is the content of your namecoin.conf file? Generally speaking, the most common causes for RPC ...


1

The Ethereum network recently introduced a global registrar object which is basicly a public smart contract on the chain. Here is a snippet of an ethereum client command line output: namereg: { address: "0xc6d9d2cd449a754c494264e1809c50e34d64562b", AuctionEnded: function(), Changed: function(), NewBid: function(), PrimaryChanged: ...


1

The Makefile in that directory appears to be a perfectly good makefile. Perhaps the build instructions are out of date. So try: make namecoind (without the -f option, the make program automatically reads the file named Makefile).


1

Unfortunately, no, the contents of websites themselves are not distributed by namecoin. There is something that is, though: For regular internet sites, your computer would first contact a domain name server with a query of what internet protocol (IP) address this site currently has. When using namecoin's .bit domain, all the information that usually ...


1

I got it working. I had was using the proxy 178.32.31.43 and the port 80 and I changed Port 80 to port 8888 and it works –


1

Well Retroshare somewhat falls into this category. It is not Coin-Based however, rather related to Bittorrent DHT technology und not well documented. There is also the Bitmessage protocol which uses Coin technology for exchanging mail. I do not know why you would build such a system as a Coin network, plain BT style DHT is more suitable for this purpose in ...


1

So you are asking if it is possible to store a huge chunk of data in an tx output what worth 100000000 satoshi, right? Yes, it is possible but you have to pay really big fee to store your picture in the blockchain on millions of computers.


1

Maybe a little bit late, but for everybody who is interested, the easy command to check if a name exists is simply: > ./namecoind name_show d/<name> It will return some informations should the name already be registered, or it will return error: {"code":-4,"message":"failed to read from name DB"} if the name doesn't exist.


1

It won't exist. Merged mining only shows up in the auxiliary blockchain (Namecoin), not the parent blockchain (Bitcoin). Basically, if you find a hash smaller than the target for both, then you submit the block to the Bitcoin network as usual and the Namecoin network as well. If you find a hash smaller than the Namecoin target but larger than the Bitcoin ...


1

No DNSSec is not needed with Namecoin. The mapping from name to IP cannot be forged. However, DNSSec requires changes to resolver libraries so the domains are actually cryptographically verified. Namecoin, to be secure, requires similar changes to resolver libraries because nothing in the current resolver libraries actually checks the integrity of the ...


1

If you know Python, then there is a library called Coinkit that you can use to create Namecoin addresses: https://github.com/halfmoonlabs/coinkit It has step by step instructions as well, but you'll do something like pip install coinkit once installed, open python and: from coinkit.keypair import NamecoinKeypair create a new private-key and NMC-...


1

In my opinion, not only the need for allowing as many domain names as possible to be registered was the reason for decreasing the registration price, but also the logic behind the free speech concept hidden also in the bitcoin protocol. In the crypto-currency realm, everyone can pay anyone, thus supporting any project, endeavor or enterprise, without any ...


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