9

After digging some more and finding pretty much every possible interpretation on different media outlets, I just called Nick Riegger, the press spokesman of Fidor Bank AG. According to my conversation with Nick Riegger: Fidor Bank AG has already started implementing support for Ripple on their back end. They will first be on the lookout for business ...


8

Gavin Andreson has tweeted this: https://twitter.com/gavinandresen/status/311290936527298561 The bitcointalk post linked by Gavin is a post by Peter Wuille, which says this: Hello everyone, there is an emergency right now: the block chain has split between 0.7+earlier and 0.8 nodes. I'll explain the reasons in a minute, but this is what you need to know ...


7

Yes - it's feasible. Bitcoins are released at a constant rate determined by the protocol. At the time, 50 Bitcoins were being generated for every block(this is now 25); and blocks are supposed to be found every 10 minutes. Miners compete amongst each other for this prize. In 2009, you could mine using your computer's CPU and you were only competing with ...


5

Adding to my answer on What are some of the proposed ideas to why the Bitcoin dropped to sub $400 in the end of summer 2014?, which I think is still mostly accurate: Bitstamp loot There are about 19k bitcoins held by the hacker that raided Bitstamp. While, as far as I know, they haven't found their way back into the market, it is an amount that would ...


4

I could write an essay addressing each of your points but I don't think it is worth my time. If you want price to go up just wait for the next bull market. The market doesn't care about software improvements in the short term. If you want to learn about all the software improvements that are happening every day on Bitcoin Core subscribe to Bitcoin Optech, ...


4

No, it's not known, and information like that generally won't be publicly released. Bitcoin addresses aren't generally publicly associated with the real-life identities of their owners. I would expect a company like Tesla to have the bulk of their cryptocurrency assets stored in institutional custody regardless, for liability and regulatory reasons.


4

The simple answer is that there is a constraint on the total number of coins that will be generated. In economy the fact that the supply of newly minted coins is either constraint by a constant rate at which they enter the market or, like in Bitcoin's case, even that the total number that will ever be in circulation be limited. Due to how the amount of ...


4

Jeff Garzik received an Avalon miner on january 30th, 2013 and posted pictures at http://garzikrants.blogspot.com/2013/01/once-upon-time-in-china-package-shipped.html and http://garzikrants.blogspot.com/2013/01/avalon-modular-room-to-expand.html The next day he posted a review at http://garzikrants.blogspot.com/2013/01/avalon-asic-miner-review.html For ...


3

1) I don't know anyone actively uses Bitcoin, or other altcoin, that is not mining it and/or trying to profit from it. 2) Bit coin price fluctuates, so as a business I would only use it to process a transaction and then convert it to cash ASAP. 3) Why is everyone losing Bitcoin in the news? True cash gets lost or stolen, but this make me fearful that my ...


3

I think that the "Euclidean Constraint" just refers to the hard limit of 21million. It's a line on a graph to which the number of bitcoins approaches but never reaches. One of the problems with fiat currency is knowing how much to print. If you don't print any then, over time, the currency is bound to get more and more valuable. That's because we are ...


2

In layman terms: The 21M limit is programmed into all Bitcoin software The number is arbitrary. It could have been 42 million, or 84 million, or 100 million, or any other number. Now the number cannot be changed. If you changed your version of Bitcoin to follow a different limit, you would be creating a new currency. Example: Litecoin has a 84M limit. To ...


2

It is an arbitrary decision made at the initial creation of the currency and is hard coded (literally) into the software. If there is a disagreement on the validity of the number of coins created, it is ignored by most clients. The agreement is a core part of the network and won't be modified in the near future because it can't be without the agreement of ...


2

There was quite a hype in the US about how bad Bitcoin is, and how they were going to crack down on it. I suppose this report comes from those feelings. Liberty Reserve has actually been closed recently, by the police forces. Their interest is chiefly identifying and, if possible, removing threats. The EU actually has a similar (but better) report, to ...


2

I tried to gather the most serious, interesting and long lasting ones on http://bitcoin.gw.gd/ There are many sections, but the most important one is http://bitcoin.gw.gd/-Bitcoin-News- , currently including the rss feeds from more than 40 websites including betabeat, wired, CNN and many others. This list is maintained and new websites are regularly added ...


2

BTC is a speculative commodity so bubbles are to be expected, and bubbles are cyclical in nature. The previous bubble went up to about US$250 and took several months to build back up and then inflect to climb exponentially to ~1200. There's not one reason for this, and it happens with other bubbles too. But I'll try my best: The general explanation is that ...


2

Since Bitcoin is decentralized, everybody claiming to be an authority is highly suspect. One early site is still going strong in providing independent practical (pro-Bitcoin) information: https://www.bitcoin.org Make sure to stay away .com variant!


2

Can crypto's achieve the same shop use? For Bitcoin, the trend is in the opposite direction. Bitcoin’s soaring transaction fees, following the digital currency’s 1,300 per cent surge in value in the past year, have made it practically useless as a token of exchange in Hong Kong. “A customer wanted to pay for a HK$56 cup of coffee, but since the transaction ...


2

During 2017 and 2018 there were a number of Bitcoin hard forks starting with Bitcoin Cash (BCH) but quickly followed by other altcoins (Bitcoin Satoshi Vision, Bitcoin Gold, Bitcoin Diamond etc). If you owned Bitcoin on the Bitcoin blockchain you would receive the same amount on these hard forked chains. As with the vast majority of altcoins, they relied on ...


1

The source code for bitcoincore.org (the website) is maintained via a GitHub repository. Content updates are proposed and reviewed by means of pull requests. Instructions for contributing to the website can be found in the repo's CONTRIBUTING.md. Given that this question was tagged with "news", I am wondering whether the purpose of the bitcoincore....


1

Apart from uptake, a second area for consideration is the utility value. When the utility value is high, the cryptocurrency is free to become commonplace. Factors like, can you use it to buy a cup of coffee, how expensive a transaction is, how long confirmations take all affect the utility value. At the moment, there seems to be a high percentage of buy and ...


1

I can recommend 2 sources: blog.blockchain.com www.coindesk.com If it is being talked about elsewhere, it will be made visible here.


1

Bitcoin’s price has crashed. There is simply no other way to describe the -40% price decline that occurred in the first two weeks of 2015. It’s dismal, it’s disappointing and it’s a normal part of a free and open market. While Bitcoin is a transformative technology, it is not immune to the greed and fear that permeate every financial market. ...


1

Every transaction fee is paid to miners. So whichever miner discovers your block gets all of the fees for your transaction, plus whatever other transactions are included in that block.


1

Media coverage actually seems to be a lagging indicator. There were more articles on Bitcoin from April 9th and seven days after than there were from earlier in that month. But there definitely is a circular relationship. Higher exchange rate causes more publicity which expands bitcoin to a wider audience or reinforces confidence in the currency causing ...


1

There is no way to attribute Bitcoin price changes to news coverage with precision. Because you can never know the exact reason people are buying or selling. The situation in Cyprus coincided with Bitcoin price skyrocketing to $245. There were lost of news covering both subjects at the same time but we don't know for sure. It is logical though, to think ...


1

If someone tries to pay you in cash, you run some basic validity tests on the cash before you accept it as payment. If the bills are just blank pieces of paper, you don't accept them. If they say "ten dollars" in magic marker on white paper, you don't accept them. Bitcoins past 21 million are obviously not valid currency because that's what the rules say. ...


1

BitcoinTalk has a Press board dedicated to discussing news articles. Each article has its own thread there, which amounts to about 7500 articles by now. A lot of articles are also linked and discussed on r/bitcoin, although they don't make up the brunt of the topics there.


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