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15

Are these people incentivized to run nodes? No. Their reasons for running a full node varies. Some of them want Bitcoin to succeed. Some of them are merchants and run a full node as part of their business. Some of them have spare computing power, and don't have a strong preference as to how it's used. It's worked out reasonably well so far. If not, why ...


14

As long as the block reward is much higher than the transaction fees, this is totally not an issue: mining isn't an incremental process, it's a bruteforce probabilistic one. I.e. in a single moment your chance of solving a block isn't higher if you have been mining that same block for some time: the chance is always the same. Hence, once a block is relayed ...


12

Pruning is being considered, in fact, it was taken into account when designing the 0.8 database format. The unspent transaction outputs (which is the only essential piece of data necessary for validation) are already kept in a separate database, so technically removing old blocks is perfectly possible. It'll likely require some small changes to make sure the ...


11

Update: Coin Dance has an excellent table of node implementations with descriptions and links at the bottom of their Bitcoin Nodes Summary page. Below are the implementations I've found. I'm not sure if all of them qualify as full nodes. btcd (in Go, by Conformal Systems LLC) Bits of Proof (in Java, by bits of proof zrt.) bitcoinj has a fully verifying ...


11

Your private node would still be a fully validating node (i.e. full node). That's a good thing. As for having the private node connect to your public node, you have two choices: -addnode=<ip> Add a node to connect to and attempt to keep the connection open -connect=<ip> Connect only to the specified node(s) What you were asking for is nr 2, ...


10

Subsidized Full Nodes Are A Bad Idea Nick answers your other questions well, but I wanted to provide a more complete answer for this question: If they're not subsidized, why not? Subsidizing full nodes is a bad idea. If the value of the subsidy is substantial, it will likely attract people trying to scam the subsidy program by creating nodes designed to ...


9

As a peer: You can derive the approximate location (GeoIP for IPv4, latencies and allocations for IPv6) unless the node is operating as a hidden service. You can query the node for it's version number. You can query the node for current date and time. You can query some of the nodes recent connections with the addr host discovery mechanism, giving you ...


9

Nope, transaction fees of a transaction can only be collected by including it into a valid block. And to be able to include a transaction in a valid block you have to mine a valid block.


9

Just some thoughts: As of the time of writing the main net's full blockchain size is 21,670,092,800 bytes, a bit more than 20 GB, that is. So you should have way more disk space that just 20-30 GB. A Raspberry Pi runs with an SD. SD is known for its limited rewriting capabilities (it's not a heavy duty storage solution, it will bite the dust after a while) ...


9

Any chain that's not valid according to the agreed rules of Bitcoin is outright rejected. So any chain that created Bitcoins out of nowhere, spent the same Bitcoins twice, or anything like that is rejected just by testing the chain against those rules. So the next question is among the many possible valid chains, how do you pick the one to consider ...


9

if I have 1 BTC on my address, suppose I run a mining node, what prevents me from trying to mine a block in which I spend 1.2 BTC ? This is the specific set of code in Bitcoin Core that rejects anyone's transaction who's is putting less money into the transaction (inputs) than the recipients are receiving (outputs), e.g. spending more money than they have ...


8

A non-mining client will: Propagate transactions to other peers, including the mining pools. Propagate peer list, so everyone will have a wide list of peers to connect to. Propagate the blockchain. Help decentralise the network by doing all that. So it essentially takes the burden off the bigger nodes by sharing data. It is especially true for the block ...


8

Everyone that ran a node has/had the ability to record lists of other Bitcoin nodes and their IP address with a "getaddr" request (assuming they allowed incoming connections). I am not aware of a centralized online database of these records dating back more than 1 year: https://bitnodes.21.co/dashboard/?days=365 Yes: https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/ Some early ...


8

#!/bin/bash for i in testnet-seed.bitcoin.jonasschnelli.ch \ seed.tbtc.petertodd.org \ testnet-seed.bluematt.me \ testnet-seed.bitcoin.schildbach.de do nslookup $i 2>&1 | grep Address | cut -d' ' -f2 done Testnet is port 18333 by default. Or run a testnet node and check what it connects to.


8

There benefit is that you operate a full node in the Bitcoin network. Yes, this is your premise but it's also the consequence of it. You merely seem to not understand what operating a full node means. If you don't operate a full node, you put trust in others. How much trust you put in others depends on the specifics. For example, a person who uses a web ...


7

As mentioned in Daniel's comment, if you are trying to connect to the Bitcoin-client that gathers the information for the Blockchain.info site this is not trivial as the IP does not match the one of the website. If you are just interested in adding the same nodes the site is connected to, that's no problem. With Linux or OS X you'd do something like this: ...


7

You can run a Raspberry Pi with bitcoind no problem. I have several Pi's running bitcoind in various locations and some of them have over 100 connections. Use a 64GB flash card and make sure you have a 512MB swap file. The only limitation you will find is your broadband upload speed , the Pi or it's flashcard will not be the bottlekneck. Use a good quality ...


7

Yes, but just running a lightning node is not enough. In order for your node to be able to earn fees, it has to have payments passing through it. For this you need to have a routing node, which has at least 2 open channels (where is payment coming from, where is payment going). The more open channels your node has, the more it will be chosen by the routing ...


6

"Fallback nodes" is a page on the Bitcoin Wiki which lists some reliable Bitcoin nodes. "DNS Seeds" are DNS servers hard-coded into Bitcoin which return IP addresses of Bitcoin nodes which can be used for bootstrapping. "Seednodes" are Bitcoin nodes which have their IP addresses hard-coded into the Bitcoin client (see list here); they're used as an ...


6

Seed nodes are important even for SCRYPT coins. You need to edit the source code in particular the DNS seeds and IP address seeds in the net.cpp file. You can run this on a VPS or any always on internet connection with a static IP address. Litcoin Net.cpp The DNS seed node resolves to multiple IP addresses that are all running their own *coind instance ...


6

there is indeed speculation that only a few people are running the majority of classic nodes via aws or similiar services. a user on reddit claimed to host 800 vps classic nodes alone on aws, see https://www.reddit.com/r/btc/comments/4aka3f/over_3000_classic_nodes/d113ffi the comment is two months old and announced that those crowdfunded nodes will go ...


6

Yes, independently operated nodes help decentralization more than the same number of nodes operated by a single entity. That's basically the definition of "decentralization" in this context. That is not to say that a single organization running multiple full nodes does not add to overall network health, since those nodes still participate in relaying ...


6

Your question is vague, but I assume your real question is why every node must store the full blockchain. The answer to that is that they don't. In fact, nodes can choose to not store any part of the blockchain at all. The blocks are only needed when validating history, to build up the state of the global ledger (the "UTXO set"). Nodes that do store the ...


5

If all bitcoin nodes run the Satoshi client then they are all affected by the same bugs. So other implementations of the protocol will certainly help in this regard. Imagine that the Satoshi client was affected by a bug that when a certain date is reached or a certain event occurs, it somehow causes the blockchain data to be corrupted or even deleted. The ...


5

TL;DR: The network is not made aware of address ownership, nor can anyone check if an address is owned unless it has been used previously (or is owned by himself). Anyone can send transactions to any valid (as in correctly shaped) address¹, the recipient doesn't have to be online for a transaction to take place. Let me elaborate a little bit in order to ...


5

The core problem with hoarding is risking work on an orphan chain. If you horde a block and start working on its successor you risk the network finding another legitimate block and forking the master block chain. If that is the case (unless you have significant processing power behind you) you will be working on a branch that will be orphaned in favor of a ...


5

Internet connection speed has to be fast enough to download new blocks as they get mined. With current transaction rate it requires 1-2 Kb/s. But faster connection would help to reduce chance of double spend attack if you run retail business and accept transactions with 0 confirmations.


5

Bitcoin node refers to a "full" client. A "full" client is a client that owns the block chain and that is sharing blocks and transaction across the network. In opposite a Lightweight client can not be considered as a node because he doesn't share the block chain with the network. Bitcoin network uses a client to client network infrastructure so there is no ...


5

While running Bitcoin-qt it is true you are contributing to the Bitcoin network, but only in the sense that other peers can now download the blockchain using your bandwidth. There are no transaction fees sent to anyone that is not mining. Mining is the process which helps the network transact and thus sending balances from one account to another.


5

If some client's actions do not correspond with the Bitcoin protocol in a disruptive manner (e.g. flooding with invalid messages) a ban counter is increased depending on the seriousness of the violation of the protocol. When the ban meter reaches some predefined value (can be set with the -banscore option in bitcoind, default is 100) connection to that ...


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