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7

Of course. Bitcoin nodes are just software that implements the Bitcoin P2P protocol. There are many software packages out there that do so (including full nodes, standalone wallets, indexing software, ...). There is no magic sauce that somehow blesses a particular piece of software into the realm of nodes - anything that speaks the protocol will do. ...


4

Your points 1 & 2 are both correct. The good news is the only time those old blocks get requested is by new nodes that are still bootstrapping and downloading the blockchain for the first time. As long as those old blocks are available and accessible somewhere, those new nodes will sync up just fine. Another fact about pruned nodes is they are required ...


4

Yes. Channels are associated with a node_id, which is just the public key of the node. The association of a node_id to an IP address (or Onion address) is dynamic and is broadcast over the P2P gossip network when your node connects to another. It only takes a few minutes after reconnection for your new IP to propagate through the entire network. However, you ...


3

Debugging print options can be changed without a restart.


3

Yes, bcoin: http://bcoin.io/ https://github.com/bcoin-org/bcoin bcoin is a modular Bitcoin library for nodejs with full node and SPV node functionality, as well as a scalable BIP44 wallet used in production by several Bitcoin businesses including Purse.io. Bcoin has the second-fastest initial sync time out of all available full node implementations (after ...


3

Transaction fees are paid to the miner that includes that transaction in their block. Nodes do not earn transaction fees (or any other fees) for validating transactions. You can reduce fees by using segwit inputs, and by waiting for periods when the mempool is relatively empty.


2

A list of reliable nodes is inherently a trusted list. Therefore a reasonably trustable place to get some node IPs would be by hitting the DNS seeds hardcoded in the reference client. The list is community-curated, contains multiple sources, and the seeds are themselves dynamically managed. This makes it more resistant to censorship than a single website ...


2

Does the Bitcoin network send around an integer saying how many nodes there are to each other as part of the protocol, No. See https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Protocol_documentation So far as I can see, total counts of active nodes are not part of any message but there are potentially useful messages such as: getaddr The getaddr message sends a request to a ...


2

Will I, or anybody have more capabilities with a Lightning Node, that is CPU or GPU Powered? No I believe all implementations of Lightning nodes are CPU based. There doesn't seem to be any need for using GPUs to accellerate any mathematical computations. I assume we exclude budget microcontrollers from what you mean by "CPUs". We are talking about ...


2

Somebody asked me about Bitcoin and I explained to him many many computers are connected to the Blockchain to keep records of all the accounts (or to keep addresses of the bitcoin and owner?). The blockchain is the data structure they collectively maintain. It is not an "entity" that can be connected to. The nodes are just connected to each other, ...


2

If I buy an ASIC miner and run it at home, do I become a Bitcoin node? Miners and full nodes are different. If you run full node, you add to the already running nodes. What is the difference between a miner and a full node? Is a miner running a full node? It says there are 9741 nodes. This pie chart shows more than 70k nodes: https://luke.dashjr.org/...


2

...could conceivably broadcast a ton of junk/illegitimate transactions to the network thereby consuming the necessary bandwidth and processing power for the network to deal with legitimate ones. If the transactions are invalid, then they would not be relayed by the network's nodes, making the attack somewhat ineffective. At best, the attacker could consume ...


2

The IP-addesses of Bitcoin nodes are not a secret. See addr Nodes don't explicitly tell other nodes their Bitcoin addresses. Since nodes pass on details of other nodes transactions, working out which nodes originated a transaction isn't straightforward. Since the set of Bitcoin nodes is constantly changing, and nodes go offline temporarily (or permanently), ...


2

Miners offer up blocks to the network hoping that their offerings will be accepted. Other nodes may accept or reject such blocks. A node that accepts a block adds that block to their copy of the blockchain. Nodes that don't accept a particular block don't add it to their copy of the blockchain and don't pass on that block to anyone else. Any miner that is ...


2

If the nodes are running different versions then communication cannot continue. That is incorrect. If two nodes interact which have different versions, they just communicate using the lower of the two versions.


1

There is no way for a block explorer to know which addresses belong to the same wallets, in fact no block explorer shows the balance of wallets but only by addresses. The only way to know which addresses are from the same wallet is having generated that wallet or having it's seed. Wallets are a client structure that collects all the addresses for which you ...


1

TL;DR: No, you just need to run any p2p-participating bitcoin software. What's bitnodes? Bitnodes.io attempts to track all publicly reachable nodes in the Bitcoin network. They presumably achieve this by running "spy" nodes which aggressively connect to all nodes they know of and poll them for more peers. This process will generally only discover ...


1

Computers are not 'connected to the blockchain', as that implies that the blockchain is some sort of central entity in the network. In reality, the network is just made up of a huge number of peers, known as 'nodes'. A 'full node' is one which has fully verified the state of the network, by working to verify all transactions that have occurred since the ...


1

I think this another case where a literal interpretation of Bitcoin terminology can be misleading Mining The primary purpose of the process referred to as mining is not the creation (digging up?) of new Bitcoin money. The primary purpose of mining is the production of new blocks in the blockchain - the public transaction journal that is replicated throughout ...


1

No. When miners mine blocks, that is "processing transactions".


1

Attackers are financially disincentivized to do this. They have to produce enough transactions, frequently enough to fill up blocks and keep them full The transaction fee has to be large enough so they cause an actual clog instead of other users outbidding them with higher fees To keep the above two points going for any meaningful amount of time costs a ...


1

Generally, all confirmations are relativistic: any chaintip could still be replaced with a heavier chain! However, reorganizations become increasingly costly and unlikely the more proof of work is piled on a block. You are right, an attacker exerting a majority-attack can censor or rollback any transactions, and thus perform a doublespend-attack to return a ...


1

It seems to have expired See BIP-0002 BIPs should be changed from Draft or Proposed status, to Rejected status, upon request by any person, if they have not made progress in three years. Such a BIP may be changed to Draft status if the champion provides revisions that meaningfully address public criticism of the proposal, or to Proposed status if it meets ...


1

Transactions fees goes to miner along with the mining rewards. Fee is a function of how much transactions are in mempool and several other things. Using cli of bitcoin node, you can get an estimate fee as per number of blocks time you want for confirmation. Ex - Let's say I am ok with my transaction getting confirmed after approx n blocks are formed ./...


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