4

Since bitcoins are sent through the internet, what would happen if my Internet Service Provider prevented me from sending bitcoins? There really is no practical technical way to do this, but they could just have a rule. If they can do that, does that mean that I don't really control my bitcoins? No, since you choose your ISP.


4

Y can't spend the Bitcoins. You need the private key for an address to spend the Bitcoins from that address. There's no way around it.


4

From my understanding on how the Lightning Network works (derived from the whitepaper and video), all parties commit an amount of funds in order to open a payment 'channel'. The architecture itself forces the funds to be either transmitted correctly (potentially multiple transfers between the involved parties), or in case of a non-collaborating channel node,...


3

Lightning Network relies on a network of payment channels. When two users open a payment channel together, they create a new 2-of-2 multisig address. As they are funding it, they also create an exit transaction for each user. The exit transactions can be activated unilaterally. To update the balances in the channel consent of both parties is required. ...


2

It would be possible to use a multisignature scheme in order to will the bitcoins. A 2 out of 3 multisignature address would be shared among three keys controlled by the bequeather X, the heir Y, and a trusted third party Z, for example the notary of X. Any two parties of the three could move the money: Bequeather X could change his will with the help of ...


2

You can write Bitcoin transaction data on USB stick using your private key. Then you go to a Internet provider or country where they do not block connecting to Bitcoin nodes.


2

The first out-going transaction for an address claims the address. To make such a transaction, you need to know a private key for the address. The first transaction causes the corresponding public key to be stored against the address in the block-chain, and then subsequent transactions are only accepted if they have the same public (and hence private) key. ...


2

A middle man trying to create a business around being a middle man with a technology thats supposed to remove intermediaries? It seems like you could accomplish what you want with multisig wallet and counterparty. In the example I have in mind, The issuer could create an asset that represents qualifications. The issuer could invite their practitioners to ...


2

This is going to depend a lot on many surrounding facts. Including where this happens. How you acquired the computer and whether you know who the owner is. I'm most familiar with the law in Australia (Victoria) where stealing is defined as follows: "A person steals if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of ...


2

You own every bit of it. Assuming you have the private key for the wallet. As far as the blockchain network is concerned, anyone with the private key is the "owner" and will transfer those funds if the correct private key is provided in the transaction request. As long as your private key remains private and you know what it is, you own it. Now, to send ...


1

I for example own 10 BTC does that mean, in some Blocks in the valid part of the blockchain is written, that I received at some point in time a certain amount of BTC? How do I prove that the Transactions in this block belong to me (without loosing ownership). Essentially, yes. Owning BTC simply means that one or more transaction outputs somewhere in the ...


1

Bitcoin is only stored on the blockchain. Unlike a fiat currency, where the banknote holds inherent value (i.e., the banknote holds its own value - it does not rely on another system to say it has that value, and a $1 banknote will always maintain its value of $1). Bitcoin is always on the blockchain. A wallet, or paper wallet, only holds the private keys ...


1

You could be sybil attacked. There is very little cost to witnessing a transaction so an attacker could spin up many nodes that claim to have witnessed a transaction that double spends another transaction. Proof of Work is secure because it requires miners to spend money to incorporate transactions in the blockchain and any attacker has to spend money too. ...


1

Buying an old computer with a Bitcoin wallet on it containing BTC would be analogues to buying an old chest of drawers that holds a wallet with some cash in it (and no ID). You might ask the seller about the wallet since it may not have been intended to be sold but, you ask with a copy of a bunch of Bitcoin keypairs. If you buy an old computer and it ...


1

Your friend will need to remember the following things: What computer she had the bitcoin wallet on. The password for the wallet (assuming one was set) If your friend only has the address, your friend will need the private key associated to it. There is nothing you can really check/see if she bought bitcoins unless she either remembers her address in ...


1

I'm sure it's unlikely, but what if someone stole my computer and I then restored my bitcoin to a new wallet - would the thief be able to spend from the original wallet after I'd done the restore? Yes. The two wallets 'hold' the same Bitcoin. If the thief steals your original wallet, it becomes a race to see who can spend the Bitcoin first. You have the ...


1

The whole point of digital signatures is that ownership of the private key is never shared. The owner of a key pair can only prove that he is in control of the private key, but there is no way of proving that nobody else has a copy of the private key. Of course, if someone creates a key pair and signs and publishes a message to the effect that he is the sole ...


1

Use multisig wallets for funds. Use a SP (Service Provider) as a separate entity to handle your smart contracts. Use Bitcoin and the Blockchain to act.


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