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Elliptic curve private keys are just scalar integer values between 1 and n (The order of G). These can be encoded by any means, but usually they are just represented as 256-bit integers with whatever endianness the platform uses. If interpreted as an array of bytes, it is simply a 32 byte sequence. The WIF (Wallet Import Format) of Bitcoin takes the 32 byte ...


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You can do this with Bitcoin Core for example. You can find more details in this answer. You need to import your private key in to Bitcoin Core first.


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Based upon the good answer by Andrew I want to discuss my output from bitcoin-cli dumpwallet dump.txt because I think this will be interesting for people who are at the same stage as me. cat dump.txt shows: # Wallet dump created by Bitcoin v0.18.99.0-12fd4bbd1 # * Created on 2019-09-25T16:04:01Z # * Best block at time of backup was 409484 (...


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Bitcoin Core will automatically create a new wallet on first start. This wallet will contain 2000 private keys (unless otherwise specified by the -keypool=<n> option) and the seed used to generate those and future keys, at least until you encrypt the wallet. As such, there is not just one private key that you need to backup, rather you need to backup ...


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First you have to be sure that the fees you gonna pay to transfer those bitcoin is inferior than the amount each have, then you can import all your private keys using a service like Blockchain.info "My Wallet service". Once done you will have a new wallet with all your old paper wallet merged A more privacy method using bitcoind is available here: https://...


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You should find a wallet which gives you control of your keys (non custodial, not a ‘web wallet’ with an online login, etc). This will give you full responsibility over your coins, be sure that you safely store a backup (‘seed phrase’) so that you can recover your coins in case of loss. If you created a wallet but did not use it to store coins, then do not ...


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