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37

One way might be to have the landlord generate a different address for each tenant. So you pay your landlord using address A, and your neighbour pays using address B, and the landlord can tell who the payment came from by the destination address. That doesn't prove that the payment came from your wallet of course, but this allows somebody else to make the ...


21

Although bloggers could turn to an external service to manage this for them, it might be more beneficial to simply offer a simple QR code with a description alongside. This would mean that all of the income from the BTCs would go direct to the blogger. My personal blog has an article describing in detail how to do this. I'm not trying to plug anything ...


12

First of all, it is likely a violation of PayPal's Acceptable Use Policy as of Oct 2011: 3(h) involve currency exchanges or check cashing businesses Given this, it's unlikely that PayPal would be amenable to helping at best, and may close your account (and freeze the funds it had for six months) at worst. Another chief problem is the high likelihood of ...


11

There is a list of such services at https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Trade#Domain_Name_and_DNS_Hosting; for example: http://www.domains4bitcoins.com (com, net, org, co, co.uk, in, biz, us, eu, mobi, asia, name, tel, co.in, tv, me, info, ws, bz, cc, org.uk, me.uk, net.in, org.in, ind.in, firm.in, gen.in, mn, us.com, eu.com, uk.com, uk.net, gb.com, gb.net, de.com, ...


8

Here's a simple way to do it: On bitaddress.org, use the "Paper Wallet" tab and create 1 address Using your Bitcoin client, send an amount of bitcoins to the Bitcoin Address on the paper wallet Print the paper wallet and give it to your friend Tell your friend to create a wallet at My Wallet. He can then use the "import from paper wallet" feature and simply ...


8

You can't get money on the Ripple network unless you trust someone to owe it to you. To have $100 in the Ripple network, someone must owe you that $100. If you haven't chosen to trust anyone to owe you money, nobody can owe you $100 and thus you can't have any money. So when you give money to a gateway, you must allow them to pay you in IOUs. And if someone ...


7

The only three ICANN accredited registrars who accept bitcoin presently are No-IP, easyDNS and Namecheap. https://www.noip.com/bitcoin http://blog2.easydns.org/2013/04/16/we-now-accept-bitcoin-as-a-payment-method/ https://www.namecheap.com/support/payment-options/bitcoin.aspx


7

There is a patch for the client available to let you choose specifically which addresses to use when spending. - http://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/415


6

The current client does not allow you to select a specific address to pay from, and this would be ambiguous anyway because the payment may come from multiple addresses. So you don't know what addresses you are sending from until you make the payment. It does, however, allow you to generate addresses to pay to. The way a merchant usually associates ...


6

It's a short list. Cash Liberty Reserve (though they did freeze some customer funds recently until they became verified) Bank Wire (though see comment below) Webmoney (supposedly) Here's the payment methods hardness list: http://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Payment_methods


6

From http://www.cryptocoinsnews.com/news/the-mathematically-secure-way-to-accept-zero-confirmation-transactions/2014/02/13, here is what services like MyCelium and BitPay may be doing: More specifically, with every additional second a larger percentage of active Bitcoin nodes will have heard the original transaction and everyone viewing the blockchain can ...


6

It would be possible if you can generate multiple receiving address for each transaction. That can be done using your public and private keys. Give each user a separate address of yours. Then you should be able to track.


5

Repeated transactions using Bitcoins is impossible, unless you have access to the private key. This requires a specific client. Such functionality is not yet available, as most people encrypt their wallets (the client can't decode it without the user. The second approach would be preferable.


5

And Blockchain.info has added Facebook "pay a friend" feature. http://www.Blockchain.info Another method -- for requesting funds is: http://www.bitcoinchipin.com Another thread on this topic: http://www.reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/v51nz/newb_here_i_have_a_couple_of_websites_and_want_to/


5

You can give them the private keys associated with given Bitcoin Address, but it's generally not the best way of transferring Bitcoins over. You ought to just make a regular Bitcoin transfer. Both of you would need to be using those for handling Bitcoins anyway, so this way would be identical to what you will be doing anyway.


5

You can for example check the Block Explorer's info about a given transaction. For example, given transaction 1c480aad976c61b51ae47401a554b09f65efe6f95f644041f838d9129e09167c, you can see that the only input was associated with address 1HnjAo2nbHGFDto86smcFiF3uUwfvNJ4cS. However, generally you should avoid using transaction inputs for basically any purpose -...


5

Etsy merchants that accept bitcoin have been tagging their shop items with 'bitcoin' so that a simple search shows what is available: http://www.etsy.com/search?q=bitcoin An email to support@etsy.com got this response about being allowed to use bitcoin: "If you would like and are able to support a third party payment system, you are welcome to use another ...


5

This is not recommended. If the customer uses a fully controlled wallet he will get the coins, but will be confused about their source because the address would carry the label of some other provider. If the customer is using a shared eWallet, he might not get the coins at all because the address isn't his.


5

There is no way one can have his account blocked in Bitcoin and there are no funding or withdrawal amounts limits. However, you should take into account that all Bitcoin is pseudo-anonymous, i.e. although there is no direct connection between you and your account address, all transactions are public and could be tracked by anyone.


5

There are billions of people that don't have access to credit cards and banking facilities that the privileged people take for granted. There are also people that get into financial trouble and lose all credibility in the banking system. Bitcoin provides a way for these people to transact without being part of the banking system. Coffee, however is a very ...


4

I'm not sure how you would make vanity addresses work for this. You don't want to store an address for each user, and if you did you wouldn't need vanity addresses. If you force the user to create a vanity address, I don't see what they would do with it that would help you. It seems kind of bizarre to force them to transfer the coins to their own vanity ...


4

You can now use the Bitcoin payment protocol to do this. Here is an easy to use implementation from Bitpay. There are already a few wallets that support this (including the reference client). More will be released soon. See: BIP 70 BIP 71 BIP 72 BIP 73


4

As well as the https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Trade page you could look at: http://www.thebitcoinreview.com/ and http://www.thebitcointrader.com/p/bitcoin-better-business-bureau.html Both of these sites try to give some kind of rating or review but the data is limited at the moment.


4

Under "Payment methods not allowed on eBay" we can see: Send cash or money orders through instant, point-to-point cash transfer services (that are not banks) such as Western Union or MoneyGram Pay using online or other payment methods not specifically permitted in this policy So we have two points against using Bitcoins, technically making it a ...


4

Create an Instawallet, send the funds you wish to pass to the bitcoin address for that Instawallet, and then just give the Instawallet URL to the other person. The transfer payment from your wallet will need to confirm before the Instawallet balance will reflect the payment but once it does, those funds are available to anyone who knows that Instawallet URL....


4

If you run an Escrow service, yes, you could get paid to process transactions. But that's probably not what you're asking about. In normal cases, transaction fees go into the reward for a new block being mined and are earned by the miners that create the new block. This takes specialised hardware and software. If you want to get your feet wet in this area, ...


4

Liberty Reserve (which was closed in May 2013) doesn't allow charge backs.


4

As PayPal is not a bank and reserves the right to freeze your account for whatever reason they deem fits them, you should never use PayPal, unless you can afford to lose your money, or are prepared to take them to court and win, should they steal your funds. While this is not specific to BitCoin per so, it is probably likelier to happen with edge cases that ...


4

There are a number of approaches, and the best method for you will vary on a number of factors. For instance, if you sell a digital good it might be easier to simply sell the item through an online store like CoinDL, where you simply direct your customers there. Similarly, if you sell a couple of items at a fixed rate, you could sell it on BitMit.net, ...


4

The correct way to do this (beware: extremely technical) is to: Reserve a coin of your own for each auction (the "auction coin"). This shouldn't be too big (you will lose it until the auction is over), but try not to make a dedicated one just for the sake of the auction (use a small one you already have!). Create an address for the auction's winning bid (...


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