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38

One way might be to have the landlord generate a different address for each tenant. So you pay your landlord using address A, and your neighbour pays using address B, and the landlord can tell who the payment came from by the destination address. That doesn't prove that the payment came from your wallet of course, but this allows somebody else to make the ...


8

You can't get money on the Ripple network unless you trust someone to owe it to you. To have $100 in the Ripple network, someone must owe you that $100. If you haven't chosen to trust anyone to owe you money, nobody can owe you $100 and thus you can't have any money. So when you give money to a gateway, you must allow them to pay you in IOUs. And if someone ...


8

Do you really care which customer paid, or do you care which bill was paid? Say you have customers Anna and Bob, who both order something. Bob notices he's out of money, so Anna says she'll pay for both. If you really want the sender to reveal their identity, your system would already fail, as Bob never pays anything. In almost all cases, all you care ...


7

The only three ICANN accredited registrars who accept bitcoin presently are No-IP, easyDNS and Namecheap. https://www.noip.com/bitcoin http://blog2.easydns.org/2013/04/16/we-now-accept-bitcoin-as-a-payment-method/ https://www.namecheap.com/support/payment-options/bitcoin.aspx


6

The correct way to do this (beware: extremely technical) is to: Reserve a coin of your own for each auction (the "auction coin"). This shouldn't be too big (you will lose it until the auction is over), but try not to make a dedicated one just for the sake of the auction (use a small one you already have!). Create an address for the auction's winning bid (...


6

From http://www.cryptocoinsnews.com/news/the-mathematically-secure-way-to-accept-zero-confirmation-transactions/2014/02/13, here is what services like MyCelium and BitPay may be doing: More specifically, with every additional second a larger percentage of active Bitcoin nodes will have heard the original transaction and everyone viewing the blockchain can ...


6

It would be possible if you can generate multiple receiving address for each transaction. That can be done using your public and private keys. Give each user a separate address of yours. Then you should be able to track.


5

This is not recommended. If the customer uses a fully controlled wallet he will get the coins, but will be confused about their source because the address would carry the label of some other provider. If the customer is using a shared eWallet, he might not get the coins at all because the address isn't his.


5

There is no way one can have his account blocked in Bitcoin and there are no funding or withdrawal amounts limits. However, you should take into account that all Bitcoin is pseudo-anonymous, i.e. although there is no direct connection between you and your account address, all transactions are public and could be tracked by anyone.


5

If he just wants to receive money to cover your rent, suggest him a different address per tenant as in Greg's answer, it's simplest and cleanest (and you could even have a benefactor paying for you). Should he want money from you specifically... If I recall it, you can add small texts in your transactions - but that's an advanced feature that requires, as ...


5

The payer's identity is often irrelevant in Bitcoin payments. The important check is that the payment was authorized by the owner. In Bitcoin, whoever controls the private key owns the funds, and therefore it is sufficient that the transaction was signed with the correct private key (which is a given for a valid transaction). What's important to the shop ...


5

There are billions of people that don't have access to credit cards and banking facilities that the privileged people take for granted. There are also people that get into financial trouble and lose all credibility in the banking system. Bitcoin provides a way for these people to transact without being part of the banking system. Coffee, however is a very ...


5

Yes invoices are signed according to bolt 11. One reason we do this is to fight dos attacks. If I would not have to sign my invoice I could create an Invoice for any node. That node would not have the preimage for that payment hash and routing of the payment would fail all the time. While I can imagine other processes that don't require a signature in the ...


5

In lightning the receiver of the money comes up with a random secret and comits to it via the payment hash. Once all the hashed time lock contracts (htlcs) are set up along a path through the network from the sender to the receiver the recipient will release the secret preimage for the chain of htlcs to settle. The preimage can be seen as a proof of payment. ...


4

There are a number of approaches, and the best method for you will vary on a number of factors. For instance, if you sell a digital good it might be easier to simply sell the item through an online store like CoinDL, where you simply direct your customers there. Similarly, if you sell a couple of items at a fixed rate, you could sell it on BitMit.net, ...


4

You can now use the Bitcoin payment protocol to do this. Here is an easy to use implementation from Bitpay. There are already a few wallets that support this (including the reference client). More will be released soon. See: BIP 70 BIP 71 BIP 72 BIP 73


4

I contacted BitPay support about the issue and they said that it'll just work. So we made our payment via 3 different transactions. As soon as all transactions were made, the BitPay window informed us:"This invoice has been paid." At that moment either one of the transactions had a single confirmation or none had any. Then came the confirmations. Addendum -...


4

Creating a new address for every transaction (not just every single client) will allow you to maximize your payment tracking capabilities. In case you have a single address for all of your payments it's really hard to track who sent you what. This will start changing from 0.9 on, but for now we have to stick to what is already implemented. Having one ...


4

With Bitcoin there are various ways to mitigate the risks and issues you mention to allow some use of payments with zero confirmations instead of waiting for sufficient confirmations to be sure the payment is irreversible. With Ripple, once a transaction is validated it is irreversible. Ripple transactions usually validate within seconds (5-20 seconds ...


4

After one confirmation, the transaction is very unlikely to be double spent. However, each further confirmation reduces the probability exponentially. Basically, the number of confirmations provides additional security that the transaction will not be reversed. One reason a retail store or individual might wait for more confirmations to ship is time; it ...


4

To transact in Bitcoin you will need to broadcast the transaction to the Bitcoin network. At this time an internet connection on your phone is going to be a requirement, a wifi hotspot at the cafe is all you need. In theory there are other ways to get the transaction to the network for example sending the transaction directly from your phone to the point ...


4

The QR code is simply a convenient way of sharing an address, to avoid having to type it. It encodes exactly the same information as the alphanumeric address and provides no additional security. If you have another way of giving someone an address (e.g. sending it to them by email), there is no need to use a QR code at all. How the other person verifies ...


4

There are no rules. Once you share an address with someone, they can send arbitrary amounts of bitcoin to that address. They can also send further transactions to that address any time in the future. There is no way to reject a transaction just because you don't like the amount or for any other reason; if the transaction spends valid coins and is ...


4

When you send a Bitcoin transaction, your wallet software will use one or more existing Unspent Transaction Outputs (UTXO) to fund the transaction. The transaction will then specify the new owners of the consumed balance in the outputs. If the amount spent in the inputs does not match the amount in the outputs plus fees perfectly, the remainder will be sent ...


4

Yes, this is a common process used by scammers. It ends up in you paying them lots to withdraw your money that has never been yours without receiving even 1 cent from them. Don't write to them but seek help from your local authorities.


3

Most websites that accept bitcoins for goods or services work with a service that automatically exchanges the bitcoins they receive for dollars. For that reason, they also use the current exchange rate to calculate the price in Bitcoin. So basically, when you want to buy a 10 CAD item for bitcoins, the website will calculate how much bitcoins that is and ...


3

Basically, you can't easily buy hard money (like Bitcoins) with soft money (like credit card payments). The problem is that customers could reverse or dispute the soft money payment and the trader couldn't get the hard money back. To cover their costs should this happen, they'd have to give lousy exchange rates. These lousy exchange rates would chase away ...


3

I would personally use a linux/bsd computer, without a desktop-environment. This means, you'd command a bitcoin command-line client without having a graphical interface. Probably something like FreeBSD or Ubuntu. This computer can still be online and used for everyday transactions, but it's much less prone to keylogger attacks and any other sort of attacks ...


3

BitPay is an electronic payment processing system for the bitcoin currency. It enables online merchants to accept bitcoins, as a form of payment, just as they accept payments from Visa, Mastercard, or Paypal. BitPay is available in every country, and you can set your prices in over 30 different currencies. Merchants choosing to keep the bitcoins can be ...


3

If you don't want to integrate with a 3rd party bitcoin payment provider you can implement your own payment module for Bitcoin (but also for Litecoin and every Bitcoin-derived altcoin) very easily with BitcoinLib that is written in C#. Some of BitcoinLib's features: Fully compatible and up-to-date with Bitcoin 0.9.1 RPC API. Design-by-contract, service-...


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