10

A bitcoin address is not like a credit card number. You can safely give your bitcoin address out publicly. What the email is asking for is something you should never give out publicly: the mnemonic that you use (e.g. if you use Electrum, they have a 12-word mnemonic code), from which you can calculate your private keys. With this, they can easily steal all ...


2

If you have the private keys for your addresses that were holding your bitcoin, transfer them immediately to a new address. On the compromised computer, cease all online work until you are certain the phishing malware has been removed. If they have already been removed by the thief, then there is not much you can do. You can file a police report, but the ...


2

Bitcoin is supposed to be permissionless and censorship resistant. That's the whole point. So, no, you can't do that.


1

I would expect that Blockchain sets up your backup and security when you create an account. If you got prompted to put in your wallet information at a later time, that would have almost certainly been a phishing attack. I suspect that you were on a website that was not blockchain.info and the mock security setup provided the information to empty your account ...


1

LocalBitcoins provides two-factor authentication which protects you against all kinds of phishing attacks. Even if the attacker gains access to your password by phishing link or malware (e.g. infected Windows machine), they cannot access your one time codes needed to login and do transactions. LocalBitcoins recommends you to enable two-factor authentication ...


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