18

You should learn more about the way the git scm system works. First, it is distributed so that everyone has a complete copy of the entire codebase; second, every commit is checksummed, so that if github wanted to (or was forced to) underhandedly change code, it would be detected by everyone.


11

Your assumptions are perfectly right. Since there is no information exchange between the two partitions while the network is partitioned, and Bitcoin guarantees liveness, the global consistency suffers (see CAP Theorem). This means that each partition will have its own blockchain fork, unaware of each other. The forks are incompatible not just because the ...


8

It's just not a plausible threat model. First, all changes are publicly audited by hundreds of people. Second, releases are signed by the developers. Third, it wouldn't even do any real damage. Bitcoin once had an overflow bug that did about as much damage as any intentional defect possibly could. The network easily recovered as people identified the bug, ...


5

If you follow the advice on this question, you can download the client and verify it's been signed by Jeff Garzik, free from any possible tampering by middle men. Future client versions are planned to be distributed via other, more p2p-friendly means (the name of the distribution project has slipped my mind right now)


4

I believe the Swedish government would be less likely to crack down on Bitcoins. I believe they have a political party called the "Pirate Party", which as far as I know, got elected as a reaction to the crackdown on Pirate Bay. I would love for someone to comment, in order to confirm this.


4

According to yesterday's article about this in The Guardian, the Australian Federal Police released the following statement about the raid, stating that the raid was not related to any involvement that wright may (or may not) have had in inventing bitcoin: “The AFP can confirm it has conducted search warrants to assist the Australian Taxation Office at a ...


4

There are a number of more complex alternatives under discussion which involve more elastic limits (instead of the hard limit which currently exists), automatically adjusted limits based on some metric in the blockchain, or some combination of both. More complex alternatives mean more complex code and more potential for bugs. They certainly could and should ...


3

just some ideas: Strategies could be attacking the trust structure of bitcoin: Buying large quantities of bitcoins and dropping them on the market causes it value to fluctuate and make it appear weak hacking peer sites (like mtgox), or bitcoin users directly (via trojans, etc.) leaves insecurities on where to use it influencing media to emphasize about ...


2

It all boils down to the amount of people who adopt it as a stanard as measurement of wealth. if around 10% of the country were to use it as a form of payment (requesting it for wages, using it in shops and so forth) the likelyhood of it taking of would be signifcantly higher, below this it would never happen. [EDIT - Found it] http://pre.aps.org/abstract/...


2

Countries which have strict AML (anti-money laundering) laws are less likely to freely allow Bitcoin use and exchange.


2

There were some reports on Silk Road at the time, and they wanted action against Silk Road.


2

The general term in widespread use today is cryptocurrency. This refers to a currency designed upon cryptographic principles (as Bitcoin is). The term "fiat money" refers to the usual money issued by governments. The government declares "this is money" (even though the paper on which it is printed does not have value itself), and people use it as such. ...


2

The Bitcoin network operates over TCP sockets between nodes. This has several consequences. Blocking URL's or domain names is not possible. By default, Bitcoin uses port 8333. It's possible for a school/uni to block this port. For an ISP, however, this is not possible, other applications might use port 8333 as well. Also keep in mind that it is very easy to ...


2

The answer is simple: if a country blocks off external internet access, its inhabitants effectively cannot use Bitcoin while the country is blocked. Sure, the protocol will continue with a fork ... but this fork has no hopes of ever "reconnecting" with the main blockchain, so any blocks generated / signed in the fork are useless. The country will have ...


2

The best I found so far is Wikipedia. It is actually quite up to date. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country


1

I found this on a Quora. Hope it helps. Property Pro: It is eligible for long-term capital gains tax treatment, if held for more than one years (which is a huge benefit). The US has very favorable capital gains taxes. Con: Every purchase made with bitcoin will be a capital gain or a capital loss that must be tracked, even if the purchase price is ...


1

It seems to me that since block reward and mining industry gross margins are reasonably steady in the short term, that if Bitcoin were to (say) rise ten fold in price similar to previous rises eg. at the end of 2013, this would encourage a near-proportionate rise in the hash rate and electricity consumption. Essentially. However, that rise wouldn't happen ...


1

The Internet is a vital platform for innovation, economic growth and free expression in America. And yet, despite two prior FCC attempts, there are no rules on the books to prevent broadband providers from limiting Internet openness by blocking content or discriminating against consumers and entrepreneurs online. —Protecting and Promoting the Open ...


1

The widely accepted term for Bitcoin and the such is cryptocurrencies. Fiat money is just a bunch of inconvertible notes, not backed by any physical commodity nor is linked to physical reserves, making them extremely vulnerable to hyperinflation and devaluation. Governments print notes on blank paper and mint coins at will, limiting their supply to raise ...


1

In the U.S. FinCEN changed the term used for prepaid cards from "stored value" to "prepaid access" and refers to "electronic codes" as being one of the types of "prepaid access". Additionally, they have widened the scope of what a money service business is, and that new scope includes those that serve U.S. customers online even without having any presence ...


1

I think whatever views comes up will always be views - why? Because decisions come from groups of people unless its a dictatorship! What we are seeing is a East - West divide. More eastern countries are portraying Bitcoin in a negative light whereas the west is embracing it more and more. Ultimately governments represent their people. If this was 2009 and ...


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