16

I believe that listreceivedbyaddress 0 true does not list the change addresses that are created as part of the normal client operation. Starting from bitcoin 0.7, you should use bitcoind listaddressgroupings to get all the addresses, and then follow up as usual with dumpprivkey.


9

If you never encrypted your wallet, then you don't need to do the "walletpassphrase" command. That's only needed to unlock the wallet if it is protected with passphrase encryption. As far as the public key for dumpprivkey, that is asking what Bitcoin address you want the private key for. To get the list of Bitcoin addresses in your wallet, you can use: ...


9

WARNING: While this answer may be a solution to the issue in the question, it involves exposing your wallet seed to a tool on the internet. Please be very careful when doing this! Can't add comments so extend Chris.J's answer: Here are my notes on how to recover / rebuild / regenerate / extract ALL addresses and keys used by MultiBit HD: Go to https://...


8

In case you have a beta7 wallet which is not BIP32 compliant you cannot use the method @chris-j has put forward. The easiest way for me was to hook into MultiBit HD's signing capabilities and log the private key being used to the console: diff --git a/mbhd-core/src/main/java/org/multibit/hd/core/managers/WalletManager.java b/mbhd-core/src/main/java/org/...


5

I don't think you can as the Trezor (and every other hardware wallet) does not expose your private keys to the computer it is connected to. This is how you can still securely spend your Bitcoin even with a computer that has malware on it. However, the Trezor 24 word seed uses BIP 39 and BIP 32 so you can use that to derive your private keys on another ...


4

Because the private keys and addresses are created deterministically from your wallet words you just need to keep your wallet words safe - there is no need to expose individual private keys. You can use your wallet words to recreate your wallet in either MultiBit HD (use the Restore button on the 'Enter password' screen) or using other tools. For instance, ...


4

You could send the dumpprivkey JSON-RPC call to the client. It takes a single parameter of BitcoinAddress to reveal the private key for that specific address. To export all private keys for all addresses, you would have to call listreceivedbyaddress to list the addresses and then call dumpprivkey for each. See: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/...


3

I am hoping you are talking about blockchain.info If yes, then I am again hoping that the above address you have posted is a wallet address in your blockchain.info If again, the answer is yes, please follow the below steps: Go to settings, then click addresses as shown below: Click on more options aside your address whose private key you require as shown ...


3

Using bitcoin-qt for an interface: listaddressgroupings is the command which will list all addresses in use. Run it in the debug console window from the 'Help/Debug Window' screen. Then, apparently, you can dump all the private keys, but only one at a time, using dumpprivkey for each key. Seems lame.


3

You can just import the backup on another computer with armory installed. It's not dependent on the computer it was created on. Remember: The coins don't actually reside on your computer - The public ledger called "blockchain" holds the amount you own. You rather hold the private key in your wallet app, that allows you to sign transactions and thus send ...


3

If I have some transactions after the export, more or new private keys will be created, which will mean that I can no longer depend on this set of private keys to regain access to the funds. Is this correct? If you create a new address, you create a new private key, and (with MultiBit's model) you need to backup your private keys again, because there's a ...


3

In Armory: Select "Wallet Properties". Select "Backup This Wallet". Select "See Other Backup Options". Select "Export Key List". Select "Omit spaces in key data". The important string is the PrivBase58 for every bitcoin address. It is the private key of this address encoded in base58 (encoded not encrypted), which is the (only?) format Electrum accepts when ...


3

It is not possible to compute the private key for an address, ever, unless there are severe bugs in the wallet that holds the key. Also addresses don't expire. For privacy reasons it is bad to reuse them, but their security does not depend on this. In addition the "now showing as watch-only" in your question seems confused. Addresses don't become watch-...


2

You need to export the private keys from Multibit in text format using the 'Export Private Keys' option. You can then copy and paste the private key strings into your new wallet.


2

You have two options: Either wait until your wallet has sychronized with the network – your bitcoin will show up when the block was processed that validated the transaction with which it was sent to you. The other option is that you can export the corresponding private keys to a client that doesn't store the blockchain and access it that way.


2

There is a section in the help which describes what each file is and the the data it contains. It is in the section 'More technical details' called 'File descriptions'. The wallet file (without the numbers) is the main wallet file. It contains your private keys and the relevant transactions. The wallet file with the numbers in the name is a rolling ...


2

After you use the console command to export your private key you'll also need to execute another console command to import it. Both commands are listed below. Command to export your private key: dumpprivkey YourBitCoinPublicAddress Command to import your private key: importprivkey YourBitCoinPrivateKey When I was trying to figure this out I found a list ...


2

Notice that your private key retrieved from the Satoshi client begins with a K. According to the List of Address Prefixes, that means the key is exported in compressed form. MultiBit's export file saves private keys in uncompressed form. Private keys in uncompressed form begin with a 5. You can divine the uncompressed key using Bitaddress's wallet details ...


2

WARNING: While this answer may be a solution to the issue in the question, it involves exposing your wallet seed to a tool on the internet. Please be very careful when doing this, since ...just DON'T DO IT! See 1. You probably don't know the guy behind the web page well enough to trust them with your precious bitcoins. Even if you do, the site may have ...


2

In multibit HD clicking wallet dashboard under wallet capabilities the BIP32 derivation path was shown as m/0h but as per this post https://github.com/keepkey/multibit-hd/issues/445 the derivation path is m/0'/0 which gave me the correct addresses and private keys.


2

Yes you can, depending on what version of multibit you have, you can do the following : Multibit HD: You should have the backup seed words. You can directly use those seed words / master public key to create a new wallet like mycelium/electrum Multibit Classic: Export out all the private keys https://multibit.org/help/v0.5/help_exportingPrivateKeys.html. ...


2

Here is how bitcoin-explorer piped commands yield the correct results Compressed Private Key m/0'/0/0 in wallet input format (WIF): % echo "skin join dog sponsor camera puppy ritual diagram arrow poverty boy elbow" | bx mnemonic-to-seed | bx hd-new | bx hd-private -d -i 0 | bx hd-private -i 0 | bx hd-private -i 0 | bx hd-to-ec | sed 's/$/01/' | bx ...


2

First of all, there is no "private key at the time". Your wallet does not have one private key which it changes for each transaction or on a time basis. Rather your wallet contains multiple private keys, one for each address you use. It is not one private key per transaction. Secondly, the ID in the exported .csv file is not the private key. In fact, there ...


2

go to help-> debug window -> console Enter: walletpassphrase "your walletpassphrase here" 60, to unlock the wallet if its encrypted. dumpwallet "filename", will crate a plain text file in same directory where your wallet .dat file is form which you can get your xprv. walletlock, to lock your wallet Don't forger to erase the file after you get the ...


2

Generating, and thus exposing, the private key using the seed words would be very foolish. It would be the same as not using a TREZOR at all. You NEVER want the private keys be other than safely within your TREZOR. The generated seed words should never be entered on a (connected) computer or device, just keep them safe off line. There are a number of wallets ...


2

When you are deriving addresses, you are actually deriving private or public keys from which an address is derived. However addresses are actually an encoding of what type of script to use in the output, but private keys have no concept of what scripts are. So when you derive your keys, they don't specify what type of address to create. Each private key can ...


2

That depends on what type of P2SH address it is. Only some P2SH script types actually have a one-to-one relationship with a private key. The most common case is probably embedded segwit. If its a P2SH-P2WPKH address, you can retrieve the public key from the embedded P2WPKH script using the dumpprivkey RPC command.


2

When switching wallet providers/programs, the safest option is to usually just send the BTC to the addresses provided by the new system (after you have made a backup of the mnemonic phrase/keys for the new wallet). Although standards compliant wallets should be able to accept each other's seed phrases, a wallet restoration process is an inherent weak point ...


1

I sent my LTC to my Trezor BTC wallet. There is a Trezor recovery function that will recover it if it was sent to a Trezor address. Hope that helps anyone with a Trezor out!


1

Log in, click Settings -> Private Key access -> Access private keys. You will recieve e-mail confirmation with link to private key access. Then you will have to transfer your funds to another wallet. This is how I've claimed my BCH. The same will be for BTC but you shouldn't change Network and should set larger fee. First of all you should get from ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible