19

Importing a private key can lead to non-intuitive behaviour, and that can be exploited by an attacker. Imagine I'm evil. I give you a paper wallet with 1 mBTC on it. You're happy and import it. I keep the private key and wait. Depending on the client/user, maybe someday you'll put some real money on there as change/received funds. Then I can swipe them ...


14

Key import by itself (from a trusted source of keys, such as your own cold storage or backups) isn't a dangerous thing. However, the vast number of ways one can cause problems for themselves through key import leads to these warnings. Many such warnings appear to address more complex situations beyond bitcoind's scope. In this case, there can be many ...


11

Edit: Answer to the question: How to get private keys out of Bitcoin Core After you found your addresses (by using the commands I listed below, for example) you can execute the folllowing command: dumpprivatekey 1ofYourAddresses If your wallet is password protected and locked run: walletpassphrase "your password or passphrase" 600 And 'walletlock' when ...


9

WARNING: While this answer may be a solution to the issue in the question, it involves exposing your wallet seed to a tool on the internet. Please be very careful when doing this! Can't add comments so extend Chris.J's answer: Here are my notes on how to recover / rebuild / regenerate / extract ALL addresses and keys used by MultiBit HD: Go to https://...


8

In case you have a beta7 wallet which is not BIP32 compliant you cannot use the method @chris-j has put forward. The easiest way for me was to hook into MultiBit HD's signing capabilities and log the private key being used to the console: diff --git a/mbhd-core/src/main/java/org/multibit/hd/core/managers/WalletManager.java b/mbhd-core/src/main/java/org/...


7

Let's assume we have this compressed Litecoin WIF private key: T4DRLwPgnkg9jyivjbbnmqJZjHRxeYTy4idAV5uwEuFdyJBGuxXE. % echo T4DRLwPgnkg9jyivjbbnmqJZjHRxeYTy4idAV5uwEuFdyJBGuxXE | bx base58check-decode wrapper { checksum 625264444 payload 22b207aa76eb058876c667dc64ab8eeaa0a073bc018561c2463d438a0444b70501 version 176 } ANSWER for Doge WIF Key: ...


7

Response to clarified first part You're pretty close, I suspect you want something simpler like this (and then typing in the xprv you extracted from an Electrum 2.x (unencrypted) wallet file): bx hd-private --index 2 --hard | qrencode -o - | feh - In particular, don't include the bx hd-to-wif step, that's probably what's tripping you up. When you do the ...


7

Prepend "p2wpkh-p2sh:" to the private key before importing it into Electrum. For example: p2wpkh-p2sh:5Kkzs8XrJNAmf9VQDFeGBfaRvSByAvPK6DbDXw5BVqswWaXSG2Y


6

According to this FAQ: In Electrum 2.0, you cannot import private keys in a wallet that has a seed. You should sweep them instead. If you want to import private keys and not sweep them you need to create a special wallet that does not have a seed. For this, create a new wallet, select “restore”, and instead of typing your seed, type a list of private keys, ...


5

The problem is rather subtle and results from a combination of behaviors. First of all, it is perfectly safe to use someone else's private key, at least in a standalone sense. Suppose the private key is P and the public address is A, and suppose you want to spend their money. Then you scan the blockchain for transactions outputs that are addressed to A. ...


5

If Eve gives you a private key that contains Bitcoins in exchange for a pile of gold coins, she still has a copy of the private key, and can take the Bitcoins back, leaving her with both the gold coins and the Bitcoins. Instead, tell Eve to send Bitcoins to your address.


5

Start Bitcoin Core with the wallet.dat you want to export Dump your private keys via Bitcoin Core's Console using dumpwallet You'll get a list of private key to address pairs in the following format: L4ysibEFMBQc3hfr7tvUyV4nBP1YQ3AgDewszoYq5czMtXotmmro 2020-08-21T14:36:58Z change=1 #addr=bc1qpw40dkvcj23zt3efvdwqr7ddfunwktx11f3tjf Extract all private keys (...


4

If you export the private keys for the addresses you want to keep then you are literally your own bank, most wallets allow you to import private keys in some way. I don't know the specifics of doing it on Electrum though. To export from bitcoin-qt go into the debug console from the menus, and enter dumpprivkey "1bitcoinaddresshere" Keep that key safe - it ...


4

Using the bitcoin-cli or the bitcoin-qt console, enter the command: validateaddress "ADDRESS_BASE58_ENCODED" Where ADDRESS_BASE58_ENCODED is the address for which you want to know the public key.


4

Because the private keys and addresses are created deterministically from your wallet words you just need to keep your wallet words safe - there is no need to expose individual private keys. You can use your wallet words to recreate your wallet in either MultiBit HD (use the Restore button on the 'Enter password' screen) or using other tools. For instance, ...


4

I suspect you can import it directly from the console within Electrum (based on this PR). Currently, Electrum does now allow importing individual p2wpk inside p2sh addresses (the 3 segwit addresses). You can, however, still import an entire seed by using a BIP49 derivation path. Try running the following in the electrum console: key = 'your_key' txin_type, ...


3

Your QR code contains your private key, but yes you can recover with the private key directly if the QR code is now physically damaged. I do not see that option for blockchain.info (which you stated you are trying to use in your comment): https://blockchain.info/wallet/import-wallet supports QR codes Bitcoin-Qt (wallet.dat) and blockchain.info (wallet.aes....


3

MultiBit developer here. You'll need to use MultiBit Classic version 0.5.19 available as a download from the site https://multibit.org. This will allow you to open the .key file and synchronise with the block chain to recover all the funds associated with the private keys held in the file. Once you have imported the keys, we strongly recommend that you ...


3

WARNING: While this answer may be a solution to the issue in the question, it involves exposing your wallet seed to a tool on the internet. Please be very careful when doing this, since ...just DON'T DO IT! See 1. You probably don't know the guy behind the web page well enough to trust them with your precious bitcoins. Even if you do, the site may have ...


3

I have to disagree with the other 2 answers at the time of this writing. While indeed wallet.dat contains all the critical information, and in theory you could just use it with another application, in practice the wallet file format is not consistent between applications, and AFAIK you cannot use that file elsewhere. Your best course of action depends on ...


3

since the group is cyclic with order N, then this key will be equal to 0x14551231950b75fc4402da1732fc9bebd (your key modulo N) >>> hex(N) '0xfffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffebaaedce6af48a03bbfd25e8cd0364141' >>> y=0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFE >>> multiply(y) (...


3

Yes. txindex=1 is not related to the wallet and the wallet does not know about the txindex nor does it care. What the wallet really cares about is transaction output information and which transactions are related to addresses stored in the wallet. The txindex does not store any of that information, all it stores is the location of each transaction identified ...


3

Exodus eventually answered this questions themselves, with a similar answer to that given by @McLeodX but specifically discussing import of BTC private keys rather than sweep or transfer. In short, export BTC private keys from Exodus, import them into Bitcoin.info wallet, then use bitcoin.info to do future transactions with fees that can be adjusted. I am ...


2

This question is already answered in the Electrum tutorials http://electrum.org/tutorials.html#switching-to-electrum What to do with my old addresses and wallet when switching to Electrum? The best way to switch to Electrum is to send all the bitcoins you have on your old wallet to one of the addresses on your Electrum wallet. This way you'll have all your ...


2

Perhaps a distinction between importing and sweeping a key needs to be considered. The aforementioned warnings deal with the importing of keys, and does not refer to the sweeping of keys, which moves all the coins to a new address. This method is inherently secure.


2

Meanwhile I've answered this question at reddit. You have already taken the first 2 out of 3 steps necessary for your wallet migration: (1) cleaned up the data directory that contained old incompatible files, (2) dumped and imported the private keys from the old wallet (alternatively, depending on how old the wallet is, one could try starting the new ...


2

All your addresses and private keys in MultiBit HD are produced from the wallet words that you are given when you create a wallet. (This is why it is so important to write your wallet words down). Because everything is generated from one thing the randomly generated private keys in MultiBit Classic cannot be imported into MultiBit HD. The safest way to ...


2

The sweep function will send all coins related to the imported private key(s) to a new address (from the deterministic wallet). After sweeping, the private key is no longer capable of spending coins. There is no need to "import" the private key in advance. Mind that you need to pay a fee for the sweeping transaction (which is very little).


2

On Bitcoin-QT can use whatever change address you want. Go to Settings->Options->Wallet and check "Enable Coin Control Features". Now when you go to send you can check "custom change address" and enter whatever you want, even if you don't have the privkeys.


2

If all you are after is getting an ECKey object for that private key, then Bitcoinj has a DumpedPrivateKey class for just such an occasion. import org.bitcoinj.core.ECKey; import org.bitcoinj.core.DumpedPrivateKey; import org.bitcoinj.params.MainNetParams; public class Example { public static void main(String[] args) { String priv = "L4...5"; ...


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