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3

It is not possible to compute the private key for an address, ever, unless there are severe bugs in the wallet that holds the key. Also addresses don't expire. For privacy reasons it is bad to reuse them, but their security does not depend on this. In addition the "now showing as watch-only" in your question seems confused. Addresses don't become watch-...


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From what I understand, there is initially a seed from which the private keys are derieved and from that the public key respective to each private key is derived. Yes, if the wallet follows BIP 32 (hierarchical deterministic wallets), then this is the case. Some older styles of wallets will just derive random new keys, but this makes it harder to create ...


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The main reason to use multiple private keys is for privacy. Say you receive 1 BTC at address A, and you want to send 0.1BTC to someone at address X. (We'll neglect tx fees for easy math). 0.1 BTC Address A -> Address X 0.9 BTC Address A -> Address B Now assume you were trying to watch any spending activity from the User at Address A, how would you ...


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You can secure your private keys using the Hardware Wallet such as Trezor https://cryptototem.com/trezor-wallet/. Such wallets are used for storing your coins and secure them from different interventions. The developers of such wallets ensure us that will not have any troubles with loss of coins and leakage of your personal data.


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You are correct in thinking that there is only one private key for one public key (or rather that is one of the assumptions that ECDSA relies on). While technically it is possible for a Bitcoin address to have multiple public keys and therefore multiple private keys, this is extremely unlikely to occur as it requires a hash collision. Of course there are ...


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Assuming the two private keys are unrelated, the answer is no. The reason for this is simple: there are 3 unknowns (the two private keys, and the single secret k value), but only two equations (the ECDSA validation equation for both signatures). If a relation is known between the two private keys (like one is twice the other, or one is one higher than the ...


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By design, it is not possible to determine the private key for arbitrary addresses. If you do not have a wallet file, seed phrase, or other form of keys that lead to that address, no one can help you. If someone asked you to transfer Bitcoin to a watch only address claiming it will be accessible by you, you have been scammed.


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There is no one private key associated with the 12 word mnemonic that you posses. Consider the seed phrase to be like a keychain, that holds multiple keys. You would need to import the 12 word mnemonic you possess into a wallet software in order to generate the private keys. The wallet software will then scan the Bitcoin blockchain in order to see the funds ...


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