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2

Since Bitcoin Core 0.13, the wallet uses deterministic key derivation. That means that the wallet stores a single seed, and uses that to derive keys whenever needed. See BIP32 for details. This has the advantage that a backup of the wallet lasts forever, at least as no other keys are imported. Since the same seed gives rise to the same keys, an older backup ...


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It depends on what you mean by public key. P2TR outputs encode an "x-only pubkey", that is a public key with just the X coordinate. The Y coordinate is implicitly the even one (on elliptic curve like secp256k1, every X coordinate has either exactly 2 corresponding Y coordinates, or none; and one of those two will always be odd, and one will be even)...


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Thanks to aforementioned info I made a conclusion – I can generate my own private key using some constraints (to be sure my hand-made private key will not fail). Here's what I have to do in order to generate a "right" private key: I must generate a random number from 1 to 2^256 Convert a binary number to hexadecimal form using SHA256 (let's call ...


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If you properly create the public key and address, there is no chance that the signature created from the private key will fail. This was true before BIP32 and BIP39. It remains true.


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It is practically impossible. The idea of a public/private key pair is that you can publish your public key without anyone being able to efficiently deduce your private key from it. That's why you can only spend bitcoin from addresses that you have the private key for. There are two ways that come to my mind how to obtain a private key given the public key, ...


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