9

Just some thoughts: As of the time of writing the main net's full blockchain size is 21,670,092,800 bytes, a bit more than 20 GB, that is. So you should have way more disk space that just 20-30 GB. A Raspberry Pi runs with an SD. SD is known for its limited rewriting capabilities (it's not a heavy duty storage solution, it will bite the dust after a while) ...


7

I set up my rasp pi b+ and U3 mining rig using the instructions in this forum post, with screen and cgminer. The command relevant to over clocking the raspi that I used is the following: sudo ./cgminer --bmsc-options 115200:0.57 -o POOL -u USERNAME -p PASSWORD --bmsc-voltage 0800 --bmsc-freq 1286 Those last two options (bmsc-voltage and bmsc-freq) are ...


7

You can run a Raspberry Pi with bitcoind no problem. I have several Pi's running bitcoind in various locations and some of them have over 100 connections. Use a 64GB flash card and make sure you have a 512MB swap file. The only limitation you will find is your broadband upload speed , the Pi or it's flashcard will not be the bottlekneck. Use a good quality ...


7

It will by default use all CPU cores available. However, if the database cache is too small, your node will spend its time fetching and writing database entries from/to disk, rather than verification You can set the size of the database cache using a bitcoin.conf setting dbcache=N, where N is the number of megabytes of RAM.


6

The database format is supposed to be compatible across architectures.


5

You can't avoid downloading the block chain with Bitcoin Core or any other full node. That is inherent to their functioning. You don't have to store it, however, if you enable pruning. This would reduce your storage needs to 1 GB or less. If all you want is to make transactions, and you're satisfied with having to trust other servers a bit more, you ...


4

Copying .bitcoin folder should work. Make sure bitcoind is not running (try ps -ef | grep bitcoin) before you attempt to copy. Also make sure bitcoin.conf is same in both places Also, change the bitcoin.conf file with the new datadir , rpcuser and rpcpassword


4

Will a bitcoin lightning node run on a raspberry pi zero? This probably depends on what you are doing on the node, how much traffic it gets, etc. I have one running on a Raspberry Pi 3B with basically no traffic and its currently utilizing virtually no CPU and 0.8% memory. Does it have to have the full Bitcoin blockchain synced or can it connect to a ...


4

Unless explicitly told otherwise, the datadir is always placed in /home/$USER/.bitcoin, there is no logic for automatically using any location other than this. The configuration file is always in the data directory as bitcoin.conf.


3

You'll attain about 0.1MH/s with an overclocked and overvolted Raspberry Pi. 963437 years on average to generate a block, or averaged to 0.00000007 BTC a day when using a pool. Not enough to cover the 5W power draw.


3

I don't think this is possible; you'd have multiple node instances trying to read/write a single data directory. This is not the intended operation, you'd likely end up with corrupt data. If you must run multiple independent nodes and are worried about storage requirements, I'd recommend looking into 'pruning mode', it will limit the storage requirements ...


2

The one thing I should probably answer on is about the difference between OpenGL / OpenGL-ES and OpenCL. Both OpenGL and OpenCl can be used for SHA256d hashing, but OpenCl is used much more frequently. Where as GL means Graphics Language and CL stands for Compute Language. GL is for graphics and CL is for mathematical and scientific calculations. While ...


2

Reading this in 2017 with a chuckle. The Pi is pretty much the defacto controller due to its low cost and energy use. I have one running an ASIC over USB with cgminer, compiled on the Pi. Some of Bitmain's Antminers use Beaglebone Blacks (TI?), I'm not sure why. I'm in a Debian ARM mailing list and there are more little ARM machines than I can count. ...


2

Might as well give this old question an answer. cgminer 3.7.2 (which was obsolete even when this question was asked) required scrypt to be enabled as a compile-time option with ./configure --enable-scrypt. The asker evidently did not enable it, which is why it does not work. It appears that current versions of cgminer have removed scrypt support ...


2

It possible to inject hardware detecting code into code of your mining software, but to protect the mechanism you cannot publish it as an open-source. That will make your currency not so popular as others. Even if you will be succesful there are people that will change the Raspberry Pi CPU and pass-by your mechanism.


2

I have 2 u3 antminers running on a raspberry pi b+ I could not get my u3 any faster until i used minera software,set to cgminer (offical) with command: --au3-volt 830 --au3-freq 250.0 In the settings menu it will run at 62-63 GH/s. you can download it hear http://getminera.com/


2

You should uninstall the installed version first completely with sudo apt-get remove bitcoind before manually building the binaries from source. Make sure that you backup your wallet (and eventually Blockchain) first (so Keep your data-directory). Don't run the build in teh bin folder! The sudo make install command will install more than just the binary on ...


2

It does work. Yes you need an external HD for the blockchain data (unless you want to run a pruned node) and Raspian is fine. In my opinion the best tutorial for setting up a full node on RP3 is this: Damian Mee's Guide


2

This is a guide I used to install a full node on a Raspberry Pi 3B with 1GB of RAM. You have to compile the code and therefore need a RAM swap on an external HDD. Make sure it is mounted correctly, or it will wear out the sd card! https://medium.com/@meeDamian/bitcoin-full-node-on-rbp3-revised-88bb7c8ef1d1


2

Like others have answered, you don't need to store the entire blockchain, in your bitcoin.conf file, you can just specify the number of blocks to keep and the old blocks will be pruned. I was doing this last night on my Raspberry Pi 3 b model. I installed Raspbian and then downloaded and installed the btcd full node implementation. It was able to download ...


2

That sounds like it's going out of memory and is killed by the system. Especially on a low-memory device like an RPi3 this seems very likely. For information on how to reduce bitcoind memory usage, see https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/master/doc/reduce-memory.md


2

One of the ways of pointing to your data directory is making a change to your bitcoin.conf file (it's usually located in ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf path) Add the line: datadir = /path_to_your_data_directory If you're on raspberry Pi I highly suggest reading through the Raspibolt documentation, it's step by step installation guide, linking specific chapter ...


2

When you start bitcoind, you can specify a non-default data directory: $ bitcoind datadir=/your/custom/filepath This will override the option set in the bitcoin.conf file, if there is one set there.


2

The first error you are seeing might be related to a previous peer that is no longer reachable. The type of the error (Failed to connect 10 socket: Network is unreachable) suggests that it is using a network that is no longer available. This can be because the peer was connected through Tor, or IPv6, and the Tor proxy isn't running anymore, or the network ...


1

Yes it is technically feasible to solo mine with a rpi3. The 'fastest' miner you could run would be minerd. However, there is a slim-to-none chance you will ever mine a block on the bitcoin mainnet, but there is still a chance! I would save the trouble of building minerd and use bitcoind's build in block generator bitcoin-cli setgenerate true 1 You don't ...


1

Looks like libboost is not installed? Try: apt install libboost-all-dev -y Then rebuild: ./autogen.sh; ./configure; make


1

An Antminer S3 operates as a stand alone computer, so you need no controller. The device is configured and managed through a web browser interface, so you can configure it from any web browser. The only downloaded tool from Bitmain for the Antimer that runs on a PC is their "IP address finder" app, and you can use any of hundreds of apps to discover the IP ...


1

You certainly can compile a Bitcoin node on a Raspberry Pi, and it will act as a fullnode relaying transactions for the network. For mining, while it probably would work technically, the chances of you ever mining a bitcoin are so low that its probably a waste of time. You can run other coins based on PoS on a Raspberry Pi though and make money that way, I ...


1

Based on the source cpuminer has a --coinbase-addr parameter which accepts a bitcoin address (for example: ./cpuminer --coinbase-addr=1abcdef..., I believe you only need to set this. The program checks if you have provided an address and if not then switches to "getwork" mode, unless you disabled it by adding the --no-gbt command line switch.


1

You do need to store data on an external SSD disk (USB). If your data and swap are on SSD media, you can use all those options (they won't matter much). I don't recommend to use Pi 2 (any version), it's a waste of time. It can barely keep up, it becomes useless for anything else and each time you restart the OS or bitcoind you need to wait several hours ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible