29

The address received 0.07014343 BTC in 3d727e3f4565e011c0348f813c2d5480210b6bae2003a0f7abaa949d1a7c599a. These coins have already been spent, so at the very least the recipient's wallet provider is aware of the transaction. Depending on the type of wallet, the recipient's account may not have been credited due to internal system issues. Alternatively, the ...


22

This is mainly adding to @Raghav Sood's answer: A quick google search brought me here from which I found this: https://blockexplorer.com/ Searching your bitcoin address in this website gives some data related to bitcoin transaction concerning this particular address (including the one mentioned on the other answer), plus some more statistics. For ...


10

A while ago I created an extension for BitcoinLib in order to put bitcoind to the test. The setup was trivial: call getnewaddress() in the main network for ever My performance index was the number of addresses generated per second. It took off on an average of 35 addresses/sec. I left it running on a VM for a whole month. The rounded results were: Total ...


10

You don't want to be storing any funded keys server side, there's an almost constant steam of hosts being compromised to steal funds. Most Bitcoin systems use something called a "hot wallet", and move the rest onto individual paper wallets outside of the servers control. It's then the administrators role to move funds back and forth to keep the hot wallet ...


8

Do you really care which customer paid, or do you care which bill was paid? Say you have customers Anna and Bob, who both order something. Bob notices he's out of money, so Anna says she'll pay for both. If you really want the sender to reveal their identity, your system would already fail, as Bob never pays anything. In almost all cases, all you care ...


5

The payer's identity is often irrelevant in Bitcoin payments. The important check is that the payment was authorized by the owner. In Bitcoin, whoever controls the private key owns the funds, and therefore it is sufficient that the transaction was signed with the correct private key (which is a given for a valid transaction). What's important to the shop ...


4

You send them a bitcoin address along with the invoice. Use a different address each time, so that you can tell who paid you.


4

There are no rules. Once you share an address with someone, they can send arbitrary amounts of bitcoin to that address. They can also send further transactions to that address any time in the future. There is no way to reject a transaction just because you don't like the amount or for any other reason; if the transaction spends valid coins and is ...


4

Think of Bitcoin like a ledger. When you (your Bitcoin wallet) receives Bitcoin, instead of receiving an item or file, everyone is updated with an updated ledger including the balance of your Bitcoin address. Here is an extraordinary explanation on Bitcoin.


4

Blockchain Explorer says received but it's not received yet! That's not how Bitcoin works. All computer-based wallets, including your friend's, have a copy of the blockchain (or have indirect access to a copy). If the blockchain includes your transaction, then the money has been received. All copies of the blockchain are eventually identical, only the last ...


3

Different orders have different Bitcoin payment addresses. The order is paid when the address in question receives the requested amount of Bitcoins.


3

There's absolutely nothing you need to do per address, so the number of addresses has no effect. You only need to process each transaction.


3

Solution This works fine. The bitcoins will appear next time I start my wallet application. (Read tuxcanfly answer) Bitcoins are not actually received by the software (wallet) on my computer, they are appended to a public ledger that is shared between all the devices on the Bitcoin network. (Read SPRBRN comment) If someone sent bitcoins when my wallet ...


3

Click "Receive" tab >>> Click "Request payment" button Note: "Label", "Amount" and "Message" fields are optional View Receiving Addresses: "File" >>> "Receiving addresses..."


3

In Bitcoin Core, the sending address refers to the address that you have saved as a "contact" in the client. You can save the address with a nickname eg. Coinbase address. The receiving address refers to the address which you can use to receive coins. The way Bitcoin works is that a transaction spends the unspent output from the receiving addresses. Hence, ...


3

Are the transactions added to the genesis block spendable, just like any other transactions from other blocks, or is that an unspendable coinbase transaction. Transactions aren't spendable; transaction outputs are. Is the transaction within the Genesis block spendable, provided the corresponding private key of the bitcoin recipient is found? The single ...


3

The wallet itself is still downloading the block and is 3 years and 29 months behind. Does this mean I must wait until this finishes before it shows up? Yes, in order to understand the current state of the network (which includes the transaction that you received funds in), your node will need to work through the blockchain history. Otherwise, your node ...


3

I separately sought help on this issue from the BTCPay Server support channel, and with their help have devised a 'work-around' for this problem. The initial response from their support is paraphrased below: BTCPay Server does not currently support API access to the wallet, and it is not [currently] possible to generate ad-hoc receive addresses ...


3

While Murch answers the technical side of it already, what you're trying to do is simply not possible. There is no provision in Bitcoin to know the exact time a transaction was broadcast (short of running several nodes that connect to enough of the network to attempt to deduce the first broadcast time). If you're trying to protect yourself against price ...


2

Addresses can both be used both for sending and receiving transactions. However, some online wallet services share addresses between different users, so you want to be careful if you are using one of those. Use a "receive payment function" or "my address", or whatever it might be called, to get the address that can receive payments for you. If you are using ...


2

If you dont want to use ANY 3rd party service, you will need to parse the entire blobkchain and put it inside a database so you can query whatever information you want. To do that you have two options: code your own parser for blocks/transactions, and here i suggest you using the rcpapi (its all json, nothing crazy) instead of doing it the hard way like ...


2

But to answer the question: addresses do NOT expire. Not in Multibit, not in cold storage, not online (unless the site retired and you do not have an offline private key or wallet), nor any other wallet software. They can be used unlimited amount of times, so that's not the problem either. The problem your face is probably in Multibit. You can try to backup ...


2

The only practical way to verify the identity of a user is to make the user sign something with their private key. The only identity information that you get at that point is that the user has access to the private key. On the bitcoin blockchain, the owner of the private key is the only one that can move the bitcoins locked to that key because a signature is ...


2

This is entirely possible with an optional additon to Bitcoin called BIP32. Unfortunately, BIP32 is not implemented by the standard client, but there are other clients that do implement it. Ask your customer to download the latest version of Electrum, then have them give you their extended public key. (As I said above, there are multiple clients that can ...


2

Why not just use Electrum instead? It's easy enough to integrate with an Electrum wallet, and it has a customisable lookup gap that can be as big as you need it to be.


2

The network contains those transactions (either in nodes' mempool or block) and you will receive your Bitcoins when you are back online.


2

When the wallet initializes, it will generate a master private key for the you as part of the initialization. All subsequently generated keypairs will be related to the master private key, this is called a 'Hierarchical Deterministic' Wallet (HD wallet). An HD wallet is nice, because you only need to backup the seed phrase that generates your master ...


2

Bitcoin core automatically generates your private keys (or if it's an HD wallet, your seed) when you first use it, and stores them in a file called wallet.dat in your data directory. You don't choose private keys, software generates them for you cryptographically. For this reason, if you're using Bitcoin Core it's a good idea to encrypt your wallet (but don'...


2

that's not a bad idea in regards of doing business and distributing it to people. however, as far as I know, a single address is fine because the address itself is secured. the security flaw of a single address distributed will be - people can check the addresses on how good your business is doing. hehe. correct me if I'm wrong. Wishing you all the luck with ...


2

Are the transactions added to the genesis block spendable, just like any other transactions from other blocks, or is that an unspendable coinbase transaction. The coinbase transaction of the genesis block is not spendable. If I fork the Bitcoin code, and generate my own genesis block. Can I use the private key/public key I used as bitcoin ...


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