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I think you are referring to consensus..if you try to go back and add something to a prior block and transmit it to the network the other nodes will reject it..


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how does a block know that its transactions have tampered with in the first place? It is not the block that knows this; it is the nodes which verify that. To quote the bitcoin whitepaper: When a node finds a proof-of-work, it broadcasts the block to all nodes. Nodes accept the block only if all transactions in it are valid and not already spent. ...


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You didn't provide the transaction but from the amount and time I assume it's this one: b6e42819b981db095d2ea7f6ac19cd9df87f63dbf20961b54357d6898c40b0eb A year later a part of the funds were transferred to a Bitpay.com account (BTC address 1MiFePRwL5WX3kqpCg36zBRLQdqscjLQ45 ). If it wasn't transferred by you, you or your police officer might contact the ...


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If the hacker moves your BTC to an exchange for cashing out then there is a chance to get it back (not via bitcoin protocol but via police / legal action). See for example my statement on another similar question: Bitcoin disappeared from paper wallet This works in many cases, if the hacker isn't very carefully. Usually blockchain analysis allows to combine ...


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No. Secure elements are designed to be resistant to physical attacks. So you shouldn't be able to do anything physical to the chip that allows you to get data off of it. They are designed to prevent unauthorized access to their data so they also are more than just storage devices. While you can desolder the chip and attach wires to its pins in order to ...


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To elaborate on this part of Ugam Kamat's excellent answer: "When you sign the transaction with your private key, you include the hash of the entire transaction data as a message." The function that turns the transaction into a hash to be signed is not just any hash function; in the code it's called a "sighash" or "signature hash". Each signature contains ...


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When you sign the transaction with your private key, you include the hash of the entire transaction data as a message. This means the signature which is generated is specific to that transaction itself and any modification to the transaction will render the signature invalid. In this case, the user who has signed the transaction has already specified the ...


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You don't need to grant someone access to the entire machine to be able to use bitcoin-cli. You can provision credentials using the rpcauth parameter in bitcoin.conf (it may be defined multiple times for multiple username/password combinations), and whitelist their IP address for the port you are running the bitcoin RPC on. They can then use a local bitcoin-...


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