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Is it ok to store private keys in cloud provider (such as AWS, Firebase) secrets (enviroment variables) in cloud functions (such as lambdas or firebase cloud functions)? That's up to you. If you trust them sufficiently to effectively have the ability to steal your coins, or trust you could successfully get compensation from them in case that happens, this ...


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The most extensive research on this topic is:"An Order-of-Magnitude Estimate of the Relative Sustainability of the Bitcoin Network" by Hass McCook among others, it cover specific topic as the economic and environmental cost of cash printing & coin minting, banking system, gold mining & recycling etc ... The results of the research are ...


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I read about this in https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevenehrlich/2021/04/13/janet-yellen-bitcoin-and-crypto-fearmongers-get-pushback-from-former-cia-director/ I have categorized privacy and anonymity involved in Bitcoin transactions as (based on few cases that I have studied): Network layer Blockchain External Network: Use of full node, Tor, i2p, etc. ...


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Since no one else has made the attempt, I will (partially) answer my own question. To create a lower bound on the operating cost of the non-bitcoin financial system, I will add the operating costs of the 10 largest banks in the world. 2020/2021 are atypical years, so lets use the operating costs from 2019. According to the doughroller.net these are the &...


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Once the Last Bitcon has been mined...it seems that it would win the energy efficiency game in the long run. Especially as it transfers more fluidly than atoms.


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If the private keys are visible to you on your AWS account, then they'd be visible to anyone who has your session tokens (i.e. if a hacker would simply need to take your cookies to view the keys). So it's not only the cloud provider you'd need to worry about. Always best to sign transactions on your own node which has no connection to your online accounts. ...


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it says spent and what does that mean It typically means money was received in one transaction and later spent in a second, separate transaction. It is a historical record. You no longer have that money. It did not arrive to the wallet i sent it too! It may be due to one of ... The transaction fee was too low and you need to be patient. Your receiving ...


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This is what safe deposit boxes are for. Write your passphrase on a piece of paper and put it in a safe deposit box at a bank that will allow only you (with proper identification) to access the safe deposit box, until you die, whereupon access will be available to whoever you've designated through proper legal documents. If you are worried that some bank ...


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Not sure if I got your question right. If you pay to the same address multiple times that is address reuse. Even if you never spend from that address. But if you don't spend from that address the issue would "only" be privacy related not security related. When you spend from an address the ECDSA public key becomes publicly known. As far as I know ...


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It's valid but it's a miner writing wrong data, e.g. changing a transaction address to his own or changing a 3 btc transaction to 30 (while the wallet holds 50). The hashes are correct but the miner is using his position as miner to benefit himself or others Miners can't change that data in a transaction because that data is secured by the transaction-...


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I personally think the whole consumption argument is ignorant. it is not like anyone here plans to not consume energy, so as a whole the world is going to naturally consume more energy as we grow, the block chains energy is all energy that more or less would be there and consumed no matter what, though if we switch to a system that lives off energy ...


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