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1

Yes, the scriptCode would be that multisig script.


4

it means that proportion of fresh node should be bigger than proportion of legacy node. The requirement for segwit's activation was that the majority of the hashrate signaled readiness for activation. Although this process was frequently misconstrued as a "vote of miners", the activation proposal actually requests that miners judge whether the majority of ...


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In this point, if Bob make a fraud transaction with Segwit, legacy node will accept, but it is not accepted in terms of fresh node. so, some group(legacy nodes) accept, other some groups(fresh nodes) doesn't accept. it means that proportion of fresh node should be bigger than proportion of legacy node. I think that this is really critical issue but ...


1

How legacy node can verify them without the witness? An example of a SegWit output is: scriptPubKey: 0 ab68025513c3dbd2f7b92a94e0581f5d50f654e7. For legacy nodes, this output looks like an anyone can spend output as there are no opcodes or verification. Such outputs do not require any signatures to spend. Thus when a legacy node sees a transaction spending ...


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You can use an explorer like blockonomics that supports segwit xpubs and also has an API If you want to use blockchain.info only, you need to derive the segwit addresses from the ypub and then lookup these addresses to get the balance. Here is a script. Converting ypub to xpub won't work because bc.info will still generate legacy P2PKH addresses from xpub, ...


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When forwarding the block to a non-segwit peer, a segwit-enabled node strips the block before transmission. If a segwit-enabled node were to receive a stripped block, it would consider the block invalid due to the missing witness data on transactions with segwit inputs. However, a segwit-enabled node will never request blocks from legacy peers as they ...


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A P2WPKH PubKey is shorter than a P2WSH PubKey. No, not quite. A p2wpkh address is shorter than a p2wsh address. The addresses are both based on a hash of the underlying witness program (i.e. the locking conditions of the output). In the case of pay-to-witness-pubkey-hash (p2wpkh) the witness program contains only the pubkey. On the other hand, pay-to-...


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Compliance with the "Replay Protected Sighash" is required in all BCH transactions since the BTC-BCH chain split, while on Bitcoin BIP143 is only required for spending SegWit outputs. Here is how it helps offline signing if you want to know how it was invented. Update: has the information about the input value as part of the witness. Note that the ...


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