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Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer gossip flood network. Whenever a Bitcoin participant creates a transaction, their wallet software submits it to its peer nodes. These peers then relay it to their peers in turn. The transaction floods through the network and reaches most nodes. Eventually, the transaction is included in a block which makes the transaction part of ...


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Blockcypher API shows only the example of how to compose a transaction with a single input, therefore, it might look like the array of addresses will do the job, but no. If you'll do this by passing addresses into one array of inputs: curl -d '{"inputs":[{"addresses":["addr1", "addr2"]}],"outputs":[{"...


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The ancestors of a mempool transaction T are unconfirmed transactions that this transaction T depends on in order to be included in the block chain (i.e. that are referenced by its inputs). The descendants of a mempool transaction T are (necessarily unconfirmed) transactions that depend on this transaction T in order to be included in the block chain (i.e. ...


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Yes, you can receive Bitcoin even if you don't have internet, but you will only see them when you synchronize your wallet (for this you need internet).


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You cannot send anything other than bitcoin to (or out of) your Bitcoin Core wallet. You'd need to acquire bitcoin somewhere else first, then you will be able to send it to your Bitcoin Core wallet.


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Your understanding is largely correct. I'll nitpick a few points for clarity, but overall I would say you have a decent grasp of whats going on here. I can send the X BTC I purchased to my hardware wallet by giving the public key to my hardware wallet and specifying perhaps .99X BTC go to that wallet and the remaining .01 BTC is left as the transaction fee. ...


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Your bitcoin client must have used a full UTXO to paid for your transactions, since you didnt own the exact amount your bitcoin client created a new private key where it send the remaining ( 20-5 = 15 ) bitcoins, also you had to pay a fees to the miner who mined the block that got your transaction. To learn more about this process you should go there https:/...


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2 thoughts on your understandings, custodial sites such as Coinbase use a pre-configured transaction fee, when using the Ledger it will probably give you a few options to choose from (i've never used a Ledger). there are multiple public address types (P2PKH, P2SH, and bech32 - see invoice address link below), and not all exchanges support all types. https:/...


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How to avoid paying high fees or use bitcoin in a better way: Use bech32 addresses starting with bc1 Use RBF for all transactions Use batching whenever possible Consolidate UTXOs with 1-5 sat/vByte if you have lot of small inputs in wallet Use open source wallets with active development: https://bitcoinwallet.guide Check mempool and fee estimates on ...


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Fortunately you have many options. The bitcoin core client allows key import with importprivkey Adds a private key to your wallet. Requires a new wallet backup. Hint: use importmulti to import more than one private key. Note: This call can take over an hour to complete if rescan is true, during that time, other rpc calls may report that the imported key ...


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Generally, I like the idea of giving away bitcoin as a gift. So here's one approach for those who are still willing to give away cryptocurrency as a paper wallet, in spite of the disadvantages that Murch correctly mentions. Here's what I did in similar situations (birthday presents to adults): Using an offline wallet creation tool (bitaddress.org or similar)...


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Gifting Bitcoin to novice users is difficult. First, your gift is tied to an obligation. In order to make use of it, they need to invest time to understand it and how to access it. This causes such gifts often to not properly connect. Secondly, the Bitcoin gift is often forgotten about because the recipient doesn't have an immediate use for it. Often Bitcoin ...


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Each full Bitcoin node has what is known as "mempool". mempool is where transactions are stored in preparation for propagation into a proposed block during the mining process. It's somewhat counter-intuitive but each node has it's own mempool and transactions (as they are posted by BTC users), will be propagated throughout the network and be stored ...


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as @mcccs mentioned i changed the network fee to a custom value and it show more fund to transfer when i set the fee to max (137) the transferable fund is 4.15$


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How do I withdraw from an address You don't. You can withdraw cash, denominated in a currency such as Bitcoin, from an account you have as a customer of an official or unofficial financial institution like a bank, currency-exchange or financial-trading broker etc. You can arrange that the withdrawn amount be paid to a Bitcoin "address" you ...


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When you set up a trade on Shapeshift, you presumably pick which currency you wish to purchase, and what currency you pay with. You would then provide your withdrawal address to be credited in the purchase. Given that you have received an email that tells you that your purchase went through, I would expect that the bitcoin were sent to the bitcoin address ...


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Disclaimer: I have not tried this, I just glanced at the API documentation. H/T to eirlis for providing the correct syntax. As the API documentation for Creating Transactions specifies, you provide the addresses that you received your funds to in the inputs parameter. The API documentation has this example using curl: curl -d '{"inputs":[{"...


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Uneconomical UTXO requested [type: 1 (limit 6831), txOut.val: 5897, required: 98140 The output was 5,897 satoshis, but based on the addresses script type (1) the estimated fee incurred by spending this input (based on input_estimated_vsize*feeRate) would be 6,831 satoshsi. At this coin selection step, it was trying to find a coin that would fulfill 98,140 ...


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This error message seems to indicate that one of the Unspent Transaction Outputs (UTXO) in your wallet has a lower value than the cost of spending it. In Bitcoin, funds are tracked in the form of distinct transaction outputs. Each time someone gets paid, at least one new transaction output is created. While your wallet may show your funds as a balance, under ...


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