5

When you create a raw transaction, you must specify all inputs and outputs, and any leftover will go towards the fee (to the miner). The raw transaction does not do any fee calculation. Example Transaction: input1: .1BTC input2: .2BTC output1: .299BTC The resulting fee would be: fee: .001BTC This amount gets added to the coinbase transaction (by the ...


5

Yes, this is possible, but you still need to check the wallet balance first. However, you need to know the fee, as you usually specify how many BTC are supposed to arrive at the destination, rather than how much is being sent in total. The sendtoaddress command takes 5 parameters: address, amount, comment, comment-to, subtractfeefromamount. This last ...


4

WOW....so this never got answered by anyone else....okay let's share the answer for you all as I eventually figured it out but had forgotten that I wrote this question: electrum paytomany "[[\"17Umi7fbYuKixnr8nRq16kMESWgJVc66s\", 0.05], [\"17Umi7fbYuKixnr8nRq16kMESWgJVc66s\", 0.05], [\"17Umi7fbYuKixnr8nRq16kMESWgJVc66s\", 0.05], [\"...


3

1) Yes. See this question for more detail. 2) The from address will be an array of address that hold the unspent outputs. If you want to select which outputs are sent and from what address, you can use coin control in the QT wallet, or you can create a raw transaction using createrawtransaction, signrawtransaction, and sendrawtransaction. 3) Fee is ...


3

If you have the transaction ID you can get the raw hex transaction via: bitcoin-cli getrawtransaction <txid> That will produce a rather long string <rawtx> which is the serialized transaction. You can then use bitcoin-cli sendrawtransaction <rawtx> or any of the web interfaces that allow pushing a transaction (just search for pushtx and ...


2

The second address your transaction sent to is called a ‘change address’. If you search that term on this site you can learn about what a change address is. Here is a breakdown of the different status’ blockchain.info reports on their block explorer website: if it says ‘unconfirmed’, that means transaction is not yet confirmed (not yet included in a block) ...


2

If dumpprivkey provides no private key, then your wallet does not have it. You are not the owner of that address, and those bitcoins are not yours.


2

The fee is paid by the sender. The sender technically specifies how much money goes into the transaction from where and how much goes out of it to where. The total output value – of course – can at most be as big as the total input value, otherwise the transaction is invalid. When you send money using a wallet software, you specify how much money you want ...


2

You can do this with sendmany. It accepts a minconf parameter (which defaults to 1, for 1 confirmation) - it will spend outputs that have at least minconf number of confirmations. Setting minconf=0 will allow you to spend unconfirmed coins, such as from the change output of a previous sendmany transaction.


2

Your bitcoin client must have used a full UTXO to paid for your transactions, since you didnt own the exact amount your bitcoin client created a new private key where it send the remaining ( 20-5 = 15 ) bitcoins, also you had to pay a fees to the miner who mined the block that got your transaction. To learn more about this process you should go there https:/...


1

If you have your private key, you are able to import it into a wallet and send the coins from there. The trustless way to do this would be to start your very own Bitcoin and user the Import Private Key RPC call. You then would be able to use the Send To Address RPC call to send the coins. Depending on your necessary security level, it may be easier to just ...


1

According to the Bitcoin core developers reference, SendFrom is deprecated and you should use SendToAddress or SendMany instead. Note that SendFrom sends from an account not from an address. The Account feature is being removed from Bitcoin core. I assume the (HD) wallet rummages around for suitable UTXOs to use as inputs to the transaction.


1

I think it did work, but the getbalance function does not work as you expect. The ./bitcoin-cli -regtest help getbalance reveals that getbalance returns "The available balance is what the wallet considers currently spendable." The address you generated with ./bitcoin-cli -regtest getnewaddress is probably just a script that routes the funds back into ...


1

You can export your extended public key from the ledger app, by finding the appropriate command in the settings menu. Using the xpub and appropriate software, you can generate many receiving addresses that can be stored on your phone. Alternatively, you can create many new ‘accounts’ in the ledger bitcoin app, and each will show you a unique address that ...


1

The leftover 0.5 BTC is sent to a change address because it is not good practice to reuse addresses. You would simply have to assign the change addresses to the users.


1

Accounts are deprecated and labels are the alternative for accounts. I'd recommend using latest Bitcoin 0.17.0 which has multi wallet features which can isolate each user, further read: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/API_reference_(JSON-RPC)#Multi-wallet_RPC_calls https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/13058


1

Funds from a cold wallet need to either be imported or swept (for cybersecurity reasons sweeping is always preferred over importing) into most any hot or warm wallet to then sent to another cold wallet address synthesized from private keys that are usually in either the Wallet Import Format (WIF) or in BIP 38 standard format (is AES encrypted and starts with ...


1

So a transaction will have multiple vins, if it takes multiple UTXOs to send the value. So let's say you in the past have received 10BTC from X, and 5BTC from Y. You now need to send 11BTC to Kate. What it will do is, it will send out the 10BTC from X, as this is an Unspent Transaction Output, it will then send out the 5BTC from Y and send you back 4BTC....


1

Yes. This sort of transaction is doable in bitcoin. A point which I would like ot highlight is that transaction fees in bitcoin are proportional to the transaction size in bytes(and not the amount being sent). So, splitting the amount into 2 outputs will cost you more than combining the outputs.


1

If User A enters their bitcoin address to where they want to receive payment, User B can directly send to User A. There's no need for you to facilitate the transaction.


1

Minimum 1 confirmation needed to send Bitcoin fromaccount to address. Example : bitcoin-cli sendfrom fromaccount tobitcoinaddress amount [minconf=1] [comment] [comment-to] Reference: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Original_Bitcoin_client/API_calls_list


1

Using Bitcoin core 0.14, how many confirmations do I have to wait before I can send the coins out? Bitcoin Core will let you spend received money after 1 confirmation, and let you spend change (money leftover from a transaction you sent yourself) without confirmations. If possible, it prefers using coins that have 6 confirmations. Is there a method to ...


1

When using sendtoaddress api call, do I have to specify a change address? No, it generates a new key pair and sends the balance to it. This key pair is stored in your wallet.dat file.


1

The short answer to your question is... BlockChain.info will deduct the amount being sent PLUS the fee from your wallet. Ergo, the total amount (sent amount + fee) cannot be more than the amount you have available in your wallet. You do not need to add the fee to the amount being sent.


1

The maximum output amount is the full wallet balance minus any transaction fees, many inputs up to and including all that have a positive balance can be combined to create the utxo set used in the transaction.


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