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16

EDIT: Caveat emptor on Ubuntu distributions from 14.10 and forward - init was chosen over upstart and is being phased in the future. I don't know when that will be done nor what impact it will have on upstart scripts. Extract from the page RentFree refers to; note that it assumes that you have created a user called bitcoinuser for the sake of security: For ...


12

There's an upstart script for Ubuntu in the Bitcoin Core source tree. Using that is the most correct way. However, I just login as the user account I want to run Bitcoin Core daemon, start a terminal (if I'm in the GUI), and run the following command to edit my crontab: crontab -e Then I add the following line: @reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file ...


11

The first thing Bitcoin-QT does is verify that the data stored on the disk is valid. Among other checks this includes verifying the last 288 blocks (the past two days in expectation). This task involves a large number of signature checks and will take some time to complete. Only after the startup checks have successfully completed will the connections to the ...


11

It's definitely not against the law. It might be breaking the terms of service (ToS) but there's really no reason why any dedicated server hosting provider wouldn't allow you to max out the CPU. I wouldn't do business with them if they limited that. However, you need to read your hosting provider's ToS. They might forbid certain applications like IRC servers,...


6

Multisig and singlesig wallets use the same flow. A Tx proposal need to be created in singlesig wallets also. Copay syncronize across devices, so you can have a non-signing copayers in a 1-1 wallet that submit proposals, for later approval. The flow is: create => publish => sign => broadcast. You can check the official client https://github.com/bitpay/...


5

If you're mining in a pool, bitcoind doesn't even have anything to do with the system. It doesn't need to be running, it doesn't even need to exist on your hard drive. The remote pool does that for you.


5

The precautions you can take from an architerual point of view would be as follows: The database storing the private keys or the seeds in case of HD wallets should be running on a separate instance and only accessible via the application server(AWS allows lots of configuration you can make in the virtual private cloud i.e. VPC to accomplish this). The keys ...


4

I would highly recommend using Ubuntu Server for this, as long as you know what you are doing without a GUI. Not having a GUI at all means smaller OS size and much less OS tasks. This translates into more power savings. If you are using graphics cards, a non-GUI OS will improve your mining performance. If using an ASIC/etc. you probably will not see ...


4

OpenCoin (now called Ripple Labs Inc.) open sourced the Ripple server code on Sept 25th 2013. Announcement: https://ripple.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=3718 Source: https://github.com/ripple/


4

Assessment I think you are slightly misunderstanding some things, but basically you are already on the right path. Wallet I signed up for a bitcoin wallet (coinbase) where I am given an id. Great. When you want to manage your wallet (send and receive Bitcoin, create new wallets etc.) on your local machine, that’s a must. On a side-note: in ...


4

There is no central authority that "determines the equations". Instead, every Bitcoin node (whether run by a big mining operation or your computer in your basement) is responsible for verifying all the work done by others. Every Bitcoin node knows and agrees upon the rules for determining what the difficulty level should be.


4

There is no need to resolve anything - some miners create arbitrary versions to attempt to speed up the mining process, as it gives them an additional field in the block block header to alter without having to recalculate the merkle root and other fields. This is harmless, provided they aren't producing invalid blocks for version 2, in which case the block ...


3

I finally end up with this setting for my raspberry nano /etc/systemd/system/bitcoind.service content of the file bitcoind.service [Unit] Description=bitcoin After=network.target [Service] Type=forking User=pi Group=pi Environment=BITCOIN_PID=/home/pi/.bitcoin/bitcoin.pid Environment=BITCOIN_HOME=/home/pi/.bitcoin ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/bitcoind ...


3

I understand the initial logic to put the bitcoind & wallets onto a separate server, but think about it... if your webserver becomes compromised, then it doesn't matter where your bitcoind is.. it is also compromised. Example; Bitcoind is on server A, webserver is on server B. webserver B sends requests -> to bitcoind server A . . replies -> back ...


3

Use Bitcoin Core in server mode and use it's notification functions: server=1 blocknotify = curl\yoururl walletnotify = curl\yoururl Set them up to make a call to your app. This way, you won't be making expensive RPC calls to Bitcoin Core. You will only be receiving notifications for operations that Bitcoin Core itself already is making. So you won't ...


3

I had a similar problem - it turned out that Bitcoin was running out of memory. (This happened when I was using one of DigitalOcean's 512MB VPS's.) Here's what you can do to check if this is the problem: Run the command watch free -m You'll see something like this: total used free shared buffers cached Mem: ...


3

The easiest solution would be to upgrade to the recently released version 0.12.0 which allows running a wallet while in pruning mode (which was not possible with 0.11.2). That way you can limit the required diskspace, still have a fully validating node, and don't need to do update your integration. After the upgrade to 0.12.0 you just start bitcoind with -...


2

Issue solved. Simple firewall issue, always unblock 8333


2

I've never run it before. You said that bitcoind is a daemon, so here how to configure a daemon to run at startup : Normally a daemon has its init script in /etc/init.d/ directory. sudo /etc/init.d/bitcoind start If the daemon needs to be initialized at startup, then it will be linked in /etc/rc0.d/ or /etc/rc1.d/ or ... /etc/rc6.d/ ... etc 0 -> 6 are ...


2

I think you are slightly misunderstanding, but you are on a logical path. You need a mining application/program (I suggest BFGminer, if you are on windows then consider guiminer). So what you have is your own bitcoin instance which you could connect to and mine from... And if you some how manage to get a high diff share from that computer possible in a few ...


2

CPU and GPU mining costs more in electricity than it rewards in BTC at the moment. You need special equipment with ASIC chips to mine at a profit. These chips are designed to perform many hashes at low power consumption. I suggest you ask your boss if he agrees with the negative efficiency of your current setup.


2

As @Bittylicious mentioned the JSON-RPC is a little bit buggy https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/API_reference_(JSON-RPC)#PHP Note: The jsonRPCClient library uses fopen() and will throw an exception saying "Unable to connect" if it receives a 404 or 500 error from bitcoind. This prevents you from being able to see error messages generated by bitcoind (as they are ...


2

I took me some, but I think I have an answer. I went trough the source code and found the runCommand() function that actually starts the command provided by notify options (it is called mostly from main.cpp and the code runs in a separate thread). From util.cpp void runCommand(std::string strCommand) { int nErr = ::system(strCommand.c_str()); if (...


2

Use a third-party API if the correctness or accuracy of the data is not important. When the financial data needs to be accurate, using a third-party API is slightly more dangerous because as an intermediary they can return whatever (possibly tainted) data to your service... selectively. Naturally, weigh this against the costs of maintaining an active ...


2

Bitcoin Core doesn't directly allow for stratum miners to connect, you need a middleman proxy to translate the two mining methods used by Bitcoin Core and cgminer on the Antminer S3. This is simplest with bfgminer. Run BFGminer on the same computer as Bitcoin Core with the following configuation, it won't need any further settings altered or configured (it ...


2

It's enforced by the fact that every miner and every Bitcoin user is running software which implements the adjustment algorithm you described. So everyone is able to compute, and agree, what the current difficulty is supposed to be. This is the notion of "consensus" which Bitcoin relies on. If some miner created a block with a difficulty lower than the "...


1

The answer to this is yes, it will. Mining can be done on most turing-complete languages like Javascript. But the true question is how useful is a JavaScript miner. Not to mention Node.js is optimized towards asynchronicity, something which heavy math equations that mining requires aren't. Node.js isn't suitable for CPU heavy tasks but it flies when dealing ...


1

I leave it here. Because i spent about two days on it :-o https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/issues/10218 Authentication is not optional. Configuring it yourself is optional, but bitcoind never accepts RPC connections without explicitly or implicitly configured username/password. So, I just added user and pass from file /root/.bitcoin/.cache. And get ...


1

You can get... difficulty from: http://blockexplorer.com/q/getdifficulty reward per block from: http://blockexplorer.com/q/bcperblock exchange rate from: http://api.bitcoincharts.com/v1/weighted_prices.json or from: http://api.bitcoincharts.com/v1/markets.json You might want to read this. See list of other bitcoin stats here.


1

You have to set up port forwarding on your router so your bitcoin qt can receive requests. Then add rpcallowip=1.1.1.1.1 in your bitcoin.conf where the ip address is your buddy's IP.


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