9

Merchants that only accept Bitcoin, will not accept Litecoin directly. However you can pay any Bitcoin merchant with a 3rd party that automatically converts your Litecoin to Bitcoin. The most well known service of this type is shapeshift.io Merchants can integrate their "shifty" button to make this easier for consumers to use, but the Shapeshift service ...


7

The challenge for picking a Coin Selection Algorithm is that there are multiple goals to optimize for: Privacy The Coin Selection should reveal as little as possible about the user's wallet contents. Transaction Fee One wants to minimize the current transaction fee, but also the overall longterm transaction fees. Non-dust change creation It would be ...


7

https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Trade There's enough places to spend your coins and there are job boards where you can advertise your services. Bitcointalk is also a good place check out.


6

While the process of spending Litecoins is extremely similar to Bitcoins, it is an alternative currency without a community accepted fixed exchange to Bitcoin therefore the merchant has to accept the work of conversion. To the best of my understanding, Bitpay, bitmit.net and the other major markets and payment portals do not accept Litecoin. I'll refer you ...


6

An output ("coin") is by definition either fully unspent or completely spent. There is nothing in between. A transaction has one or more inputs (which refer to the unspent outputs of earlier transaction) and it fully consumes them. A transaction can also have 1 or more outputs. For each output a value is specified (number of Satoshis), so by being a little ...


5

Bitcoin doesn't use the concept of "balances" it uses transactions. A transaction consists of inputs and outputs. The transaction amount is the total of all inputs. Each input in a transaction is spent in its entirety during the transaction. And the outputs can total any amount up to the total transaction amount. Any amount remaining (inputs - outputs) ...


5

In practice your invoice fee should be cited in the most stable and liquid of the currencies you support. Typically your national currency since you live with it anyway. The contract would then stipulate that if the client pays in another currency that the amount that the client must pay is the going rate to sell that currency back into the primary ...


5

You are technically able to do this but it is strongly not recommended. A transaction can spend the output of another transaction so long as the parent transaction is known by the node in question, however this is quite fragile. Bitcoin transactions back reference by TXID, a cryptographic hash of the previous one being spent. Due to a property known as ...


5

Your question indicates certain misconceptions about what Bitcoin is. I would advice you to take an afternoon to read the Bitcoin whitepaper, learn from other sources and understand as much as possible. It is possible to know what Bitcoins truly are without great technical knowledge. (Bitcoin transactions can only be made with the owner's private key. A "...


4

I assume you're using Bitcoin-Qt, i.e. the reference implementation. Bitcoin-Qt works with accounts, not addresses. The balance of your wallet is the sum of each account balance. The purpose of accounts is to compartmentalize payments in labels such as "Savings", "Salary", "Friends", etc. for your own convenience. Each account has many Bitcoin addresses ...


4

Your timing is perfect. Yesterday Flattr announced that they were going to implement Bitcoin.


4

That's because storing, mining, and buying bitcoins present new challenges. However, getting paid in bitcoins is pretty much the same as getting paid in USD, gold, or Ithica Hours; you need to make a service people want. I don't see people accepting bitcoin exclusively for a long time - Even if 50% of the population is willing to use bitcoin, that's still ...


3

Here's a list I am trying to maintain: http://www.bitcointrading.com/forum/spend-bitcoins/online-stores-accepting-bitcoins/


3

Both inflation and deflation are bad for currencies, because they cause people to make decisions that don't really make sense. Let me give you two examples. I sell toasters for bitcoin; you have bitcoin. Inflation: You know that the price of toasters in bitcoins is going to go up, so you start buying toasters in bulk. You didn't really want all of these ...


3

The private keys you mention is nothing but "permission" to make changes to the P2P General Ledger known as the bitcoin network. A "Bitcoin" really doesn't exist, rather a Bitcoin is just an entry in the GL, with a deposit into your "public key" (aka account). When money is added to your account, someone else (the spender) signs the transaction and ...


3

Easy: you transfer them to other addresses. Go to Mt Gox, log in, select "Funding Options," select "Withdraw," select "Bitcoin" in the drop down box. You then can put in an amount, and an address of where you want to send your BC (bitcoins). If you want to know where to spend them, check out https://www.bitcoinstore.com/ as an example. Personally, I am ...


3

A paper wallet has a private key ("Redeem") and a Bitcoin address ("Load & Verify"). You can import the private key in the Bitcoin-Qt/bitcoind client using the Debug console or the command line API. You can import the private key into Mt. Gox (Funding, then Redeem, Private key) and it will sweep the funds to your exchange E-Wallet account. You can ...


3

It is important to understand that the spent flag you are talking about, is not a field of an output that is stored in the blockchain. It is rather created internally by the client interacting with the blockchain. The only fields of information of an output that is permanently stored on the blockchain are: The Amount The Locking-Script Size The Locking-...


2

ltc and btc are two different crypto currencies and are treated as such. For example, BitInstant currently does NO business in ltc. However, you will find some places like btc-e will deal in BOTH ltc AND btc.


2

I don't quite get the point of bitaddress.org. My advice is to copy the private key they gave you, and import it into another wallet of your choice, such as blockchain.info.


2

Go to funding options -> withdraw funds -> choose withdraw method Bitcoin -> Enter the amount you want to transfer -> Enter a bitcoin adress Preferably send to your wallet and use your wallet for purchases.


2

The analogy of "coins" as individual objects that can be handled is misleading. The atomic unit in Bitcoin is a satoshi, but satoshis are not handled individually, rather in each transaction it is specified how many satoshis (as an integer variable) move from where to where. The total number of satoshis in the input must be at least as great as in the output,...


2

I beg to differ. If you go to https://blockchain.info/, and look at the 'latest transactions', you'll see numerous transactions taking place continuously. Also, there is a quite a bit of discussion within the bitcoin community about the need to increase the limit of 7 transactions per second, and ways that this limit can be increased.


2

This seems rather odd to me. I try to time my purchases with Bitcoins for times when the price is high. And I try to time my purchases of Bitcoins for times when the price is low. If I use a service like this, I'll either be buying high or selling low, which is not my personal preference.


2

You do not need to calculate previous transaction hash, because it is already known. To spend the previous output you just have to know tx hash output index in this tx output value output script plus you should choose fee new address then create some byte data and sign it with appropriate private key Good manual you can find here: How to redeem a ...


2

It appears that the wallet moved my funds to a new address in my wallet. That is normal and desirable behavior. See How does change work in a bitcoin transaction? Should a wallet always move the left over from m/49'/0'/0'/0/x to m/49'/0'/0'/x/0? This wallet is using BIP 49, which extends the hierarchical wallet organization described in BIP 44. ...


2

I have fixed the issue by attaching input info while signing the transaction. createrawtransaction: createrawtransaction '[{"txid":"0cb0c97c206bf2229fac8800fe05410d23bbc5afe2b243ff921ef2065b210b34","vout":1,"scriptPubKey":"76a9144e03fd2b3eff32ee90d29524eb6f058719f3b50f88ac"}]' '{"mtRWdkBpAyz8pUoCYobABvnEe1xFPqvkJN":0.36972432}' result: ...


2

The only real "safe" way to invest in mining is to simply start mining yourself. There are many online resources for teaching you how to do this. Depending on the price of Bitcoin, your local electricity, network difficulty, and the price of your equipment your profitability will vary greatly. In most cases it may make sense to just buy and hold the coin and ...


2

Trying to enumerate all private keys using Bitcoin Core's wallet is extremely inefficient. Furthermore, any address that you generate in Bitcoin Core will inherently come from a HD seed because Bitcoin Core is a HD wallet and uses a HD seed. You also aren't going to get any information for a HD address that is not part of your wallet. However, I am not ...


1

A script exists on GitHub by the name of coinsweep.


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