Hot answers tagged

8

Everything is already stored in the blockchain, and there is nothing to "pick up". The blockchain stores: "A generate a block (25 btc now)" and "A sends 2 btc to B". When you want to send bitcoins, you proof that you are "B" and sign a message saying "I own these coins (A->B) and want to send all of them (2 btc) to C". Now "C" owns 2 bitcoins. (This of ...


7

The blockchain will not reach its maximum capacity by the year 2140, the only thing that is going to change is that all bitcoins (a little less than 21M bitcoins) will have been mined by then and the total number of blocks at that time will be around 6,929,999. Assuming that a block's maximum size will remain 1 MB then we can estimate that the maximum ...


7

It's not Bitcoin Core that's taking up all the space, but the Bitcoin blockchain that Core needs to download, validate, and reference. This is because Bitcoin Core is what's called a full node. There is another type of wallet, called an SPV client, that does not require the full blockchain to operate, but relies on the trustworthiness of other peers in ...


6

Coinomi Universal HD Wallet will do exactly what you're looking for. Coinomi is a very secure and lightweight, universal, open-source HD wallet for Bitcoin and many altcoins. At the moment the supported coins are: Bitcoin Dogecoin Litecoin Peercoin Darkcoin Reddcoin NuBits NuShares Blackcoin Feathercoin Rubycoin Digitalcoin Cannacoin with more ...


6

You can reduce disk-space usage of Bitcoin-Core by enabling pruning. Enabling pruning means you delete old, already verified blocks without reducing your security. Once old blocks are validated and used for building the UTXO set they are no longer useful for your node. The only purpose to keep them is for sending the blocks to other nodes in IBD (initial ...


6

The blockchain (at least as far as Bitcoin goes) is a series of transactions, collected in blocks. This data is stored on each and every full node (pruning aside). There is no cloud based storage as part of the bitcoin network, although third parties host various forms of parsed data in the form of explorers and other such products, some of which may use ...


5

It's not really clear what your use case is. If you need to retrieve the addresses later, you can store each address as a string. That's only ~34MB, which easily fits in memory. To save space, you can convert each address to hash160 format, which is only 20 bytes. In total, that's 20 MB. If you're merely trying to test whether a Bitcoin address is ...


5

Starting with Bitcoin Core 0.12.0, due out in Jan/Feb 2016, you'll be able to add the prune option to your configuration file to only store the most recent blocks. For example, if you specify prune=5000, you'll only store as many of the recent blocks as fit into 5,000 MiB of disk space. On top of that, you'll also have to store the UTXO database, which is ...


4

Currently, only full-nodes, i.e. nodes that have the complete blockchain inventorized relay blocks. Personally, I've recently encountered the first problem, when my Linux partition ran out of storage, yet if I had chosen a bigger partition size, I'd be able to even afford a multiple of the 50GiB easily. Storage usage: Currently, the blockchain is about ...


4

I'm not sure if there is a software wallet to do this, but if you want it for cold storage, you can definitely create addresses for almost all the cryptocurrencies from a raw 256 bit private key. This allows you to just securely store the 256 bit key rather than the individual wallet files for multiple cryptocoins. You can do this by: Creating a 256 ...


4

Bitcoin Armoury is the best thing out there for this. What you want to do is create a new wallet with armoury, create a receiving address and send your BTC there. The best thing is you do not need to even be connected to the network, synchronized or anything. Armoury can run offline in the dungeons far underneath the earth (like your cellar :) ) You then ...


4

You need at least DECIMAL(16,8) to store any valid Bitcoin amount (i.e. up to just over 20 Million Bitcoin, requiring 8 digits to the left of the decimal point) precisely (i.e. down to a single Satoshi, requiring 8 digits to the right of the decimal point). Depening on your application and how you (or your collaborators) think of Bitcoin amounts, it may be ...


4

There are different ways of interacting with Bitcoin. If you just want to make an occasional payment, and don't want to handle large sums, you'll probably be happy to run a Thin Client on your smartphone. They rely on full nodes to provide data, but when you wait for a few confirmations are sufficiently secure. To learn more about different types of wallets, ...


4

If you want to run full BCH node - then yes. Most of these 140Gb is the same for now as with BTC node though, but that's not going to help you in reducing space requirements. You can always run your node pruned, with ~5-10Gb space requirement max. If you intend to run both BCH and BTC nodes at the same time on same computer - the issue will be that they ...


4

You can encrypt your data before you store it. However anyone would have access to the encrypted data and, if the encryption is broken (either now or in the future), the encrypted data will be revealed.


3

Since Bitcoin's precision is 8 decimal numbers, decimal (13, 4) won't cut it. So you better go with (13, 8).


3

Yes, it is possible to delete boostrap.dat mid sync. Next time you start the Bitcoin client it will continue to sync from the network.


3

Ledger 8470000 in JSON format (without inner nodes) is 115 MB large. You can get it if you issue the "ledger" API call on a rippled that you own - it's an admin-only call, as it takes lots of ressources to assemble it. If you are asking about the size of the databases rippled uses in the backend, these are about 9 GB (ledger headers + validations archive) ~...


3

Bitcoins themselves are not stored anywhere. The only things stored are (1) the blockchain, basically a record of all transactions, and (2) your wallet which most importantly contains your private key(s). I think what you are talking about is to send Bitcoins to another wallet of yours but not update the new wallet yet. Meaning: not letting the client ...


3

I wouldn't recommend CD/DVD or USB sticks. CD/DVDs don't actually have that long of a lifespan. Googling around I found various different estimates and no exact number, but the consensus is that they will probably last less than 10 years. Finding an estimate for how long a usb drive will last is a little bit more hazy, but the numbers I saw for that were ...


3

OP_RETURN is meant to store extra data on the blockchain. As fees are per kbyte, you'll be paying more fee. Remember that block size is limited (1MB now every 10 minutes, but growing) and fees are expected to go up quite a bit, so if your application needs to be able to scale, you really need to do some calculations whether yours is a viable solution at all ...


3

Usually hashes are what's stored in the blockchain, not the data itself. It's safe to store hashes because it's extremely difficult to reconstruct a message given its hash (the so-called pre-image attack).


3

Yes but you will have to specify different folder for blockchain data because BCH uses the same folder as BTC. "However, there is a “gotcha”: At least the current Bitmain-coin code will use the original Bitcoin directories by default. This means if you wish to install or use Bitmain-coin yourself, it will mess up your Bitcoin installation! Using both ...


3

Storing private keys in an online server is not best practices (even if you quickly transfer to an offline wallet). Generally, you should not store private keys on an online device Instead, if you use a BIP32 HD wallet architecture, you can just store an extended public key on your online server. This will allow you to generate receiving addresses on the ...


3

This is a known issue and a bug with APFS. This will be fixed in the next version of Bitcoin Core.


2

As a gift to a child, I'd recommend something more tangible than paper, such as a Casascius coin or gold-plated bar. Yeah, it's more than a fraction of a bitcoin, but the load-it-yourself option might be more affordable.


2

I recommend printing out too. Crossposting from something I posted to reddit here, especially since I have direct experience with digital data going bad on supposedly stable mediums (e.g. CDRs.) Reasons for using a simple paper wallet instead of digital data 1) Inheritance. If you were to die very unexpectedly from an Aneurysm, will your family (A) know ...


2

Say you generate a new Bitcoin address using a tool like bitaddress.org, you can immediately receive a payment on that address. Once you have received the payment, you already "own" the amount, because you have the private key to unlock those funds. The fact that the address is not in your wallet.dat doesn't matter. In that sense, there's nothing to "pick up"...


2

Seems that the new 1.5 nxt version is giving users the ability to attach up to 40kb worth of data in the blockchain. See here: NXT 1.5 decentralized storage on the blockchain Also found the discussion of NXT Transient Data where data can be stored on the blockchain temporarily and then removed after a certain amount of time to reduce blockchain bloat. As ...


2

You get a gas refund of 15000 for resetting a storage slot to zero, but you have to use this gas during the current transaction (more specifically, you get at most one half of the total spent gas as a refund). This means you can trade some cleanup with other operations, but you will never be returned such refunded gas in ether. So the general idea is that ...


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