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50

I have been scammed 6 months ago Then criminals expect you to be gullible and foolish. You are a prime target for them. So they'll try new ways to trick you. BTC REFUND DEPARTMENT No such thing. synchronise my wallet with the address They want to fool you with a watch-only address, where your wallet shows an amount of money that belongs to someone else ...


30

Fungibility. Money needs to be fungible, otherwise it's not money at all. Blacklists allow censorship and confiscation of wealth by centralized/powerful players (like governments) which will be abused to screw over innocent people Or (hopefully) scare those people away from Bitcoin in the first place: why would you invest in Bitcoin if you know you could ...


25

ECDSA signatures are pairs (r,s) where r=(kG).x mod n, and s = (m + rx)/k mod n, where x is the secret key, k is the random nonce, and m is the message. If you have two s values s1 and s2 for the same secret key and with the same nonce k (and thus the same value r), the following holds: s1 = (m1 + r*x)/k s2 = (m2 + r*x)/k From that we can derive: s1 * k = ...


21

Blockchain.info pairing code allows you to sync wallets. For example, it's for when you have coins on your phone and you want to be able to spend them from your computer. So, they synced their wallet with your account, including the private keys, and stole your coins. From their website: As with your wallet ID, you should never share your pairing code ...


18

It wouldn't work. Imagine if you get to a grocery store and try to pay in cash and they say, "Sorry, your dollars are no good, their serial numbers are on a list of bills that have been stolen". You might have gotten those dollars in change yesterday from that very same grocery store because that's where the thief spent them before they got on the list. ...


10

Here all famous scammers/sites: List of Known Bitcoin Scams: Beware of Fraudsters! Bitcoin Scammers list


6

It really isn't possible to create a blacklist of stolen bitcoins. While it is possible to easily trace stolen bitcoins, thieves can utilize a number of services, such as bitcoin mixing services, that mix stolen bitcoins with other (sometimes even freshly mined) bitcoins before redistributing the bitcoins to new wallet addresses. Because wallets are ...


5

Bitcoin is decentralized. There is no "we" to appeal to even if we wanted. You may be able to convince a miner to not include txs that go to certain addresses. That is their right. But that certainly won't prevent dealings that are unethical or wrong. That's like saying "why can't merchants not accept stolen $100 bills?" There is a huge tax for everyone if ...


5

Selfish Mining cannot be used to change transactions in any way, therefore, it is impossible to steal funds in such fashion. Also, Selfish Mining is somewhat the opposite of Double-Spending, as double-spending would require you to publish your own blocks as quickly as possible in order to overtake the network, while selfish mining is based on keeping ...


5

Interesting points Paper, here some of my thoughts... As you said, on the underground (i.e. TOR) there are forums where thieves are selling dirty coins, with a favorable exchange rate (1 clean coin for 2 dirty coins for example). But to avoid scam I suppose they will use some kind of anonymous escrow service to perform the exchange, to guarantee that both ...


5

If your private key was stolen, then the thief can provide you with definitive proof that he possesses the key---for example, by spending your funds. But unless you have such proof, all you can do is guess whether your private key has been stolen. There's no definitive way to prove that your key hasn't been stolen. Usually, if you have enough evidence to ...


4

Unless you happen to know who owns 16fYQiV2cdHuycGo3eibE5JSKvndY2z8Gw, there is no way for you to get back your Bitcoin. You could try to raise awareness that this address holds stolen coin, but I don't see how that would benefit you in any way. What happened is essentially the Bitcoin equivalent of somebody taking your dollar bills from your wallet without ...


4

Just to elaborate on the comment by Diego Basch: Of course, Bitcoin has no solution for the fundamental problem that the threat of force can compel a person to do something they don't want to. (Maybe that bug will be fixed in the next version of civilization.) But street robbery should ultimately be less of a risk than you think. Although it's possible ...


3

I'm sorry you were scammed. One of the reasons that many experts don't think bitcoin is ready for mass adoption or retail use is precisely because people don't understand how to keep them secure. You gave someone access to your key and they made a copy of it, then you locked out their access to your key. That didn't do any good though, because they had ...


3

When broadcasting a tx, a regular node checks for two things: Is the transaction standard, and is the transaction valid. Standard transactions are, for simplicity's sake, transactions that create p2sh, p2pkh, p2wpkh, p2wsh, and OP_RETURN outputs. A standard transaction must also consume inputs in a few known scripts, namely multisig and regular single key ...


3

Validation. You can totally broadcast a fraudulent transaction, but nodes in the network will ignore it as it is invalid. Furthermore, nodes will also ignore any blockchain which contains any fraudulent transaction. As a result, miners are financially disincentivized from doing so.


3

I assume this is referring to the duckduckcoin launch fiasco. For pre-mined coins based on the Bitcoin software, the pre-mined coins typically just go to whoever mines the first few blocks. The idea is that you don't open the software up until those blocks are mined. But if you do, and someone else mines those blocks, they get the pre-mine. To protect ...


3

It is a fallacy of the alternative disjunct to assume that your private key is in fact private, just because a potential other party has not used it: The two events "somebody has gained access to my private key" and "nobody has used my private key" are not disjunct. If you are uncertain whether your private key has been compromised, you should move your ...


3

Sorry to hear that you have had your device stolen. When using Coinomi all you need to be able to restore your funds on a new device is the 24word recovery phrase which you were given when you set up your wallet. You can learn more about this here Since Coinomi is an HD wallet, all you need as a backup is your Recovery Phrase ... If you ever lose or ...


3

If I read it correctly, your friend had an address, to which you paid. Then someone took it from their wallet? It might be because your friend's device is hacked or he doesn't use a trustworthy wallet. Or it was him who spent the coins. It's also possible that they are lying to you so that you pay them again. Double spend attacks involve the same person ...


2

Unfortunately, there is not much you can do. By design, it is very difficult to identify a person from a Bitcoin address. In principle, if the thief eventually transfers the coins to an exchange in order to sell them, it could be possible to trace the coins to that point, and the exchange might know who got the money. But they would probably not divulge ...


2

Exploits / Hacks resulting in BTC theft: The Linode Incident - 46,000 BTC were stolen due to the compromise of a single employee workstation. Slush's Backup Hacked - 3094 BTC stolen after a backup of Slush's pool was compromised. Mt.Gox Database Theft - a reported 100,000 BTC were stolen, and another 400,000 BTC reported 'missing'. Mt.Gox shuts down and ...


2

If the blockchain shows the money was in your account, then they have fulfilled their requirements. At that point, any transfer of money OUT of your account needs to be signed by your private key. This signed transaction is what is in the blockchain. The most likely situation is that the application you used to generate the key generated a weak key. If, for ...


2

Yes, for example, a company named Bitcoins Reserve lost 100 BTC when an attacker hijacked the CEO's email address and sent instructions to the CTO requesting a client withdrawal while instead providing their own Bitcoin address. This and other incidents are described here: https://bitcoinmagazine.com/articles/cautionary-tales-bitcoin-security-1422491521/


2

How can I track to what bitcoin wallet You cannot. and where that wallet is registered at? You cannot tell from the address alone, Wallets are not "registered", anyone can download wallet software and run it on their phone or computer without registering with any organisation, without notifying any organisation, without creating an account. Some ...


2

If the company follows good security practices no single person would have access to the cold wallet where 90+% of the funds would be stored. There might be single employees with access to the hot wallets which are the ones that are doing the day to day transactions and when the hot wallets run low transfers from the cold to hot wallets would require ...


1

I believe the large threat of theft of Bitcoin or digital assets is through hacking into your account located on an exchange or possibly your wallet. I do not believe you find theft at this point in time elsewhere. In the future we may see qubits or quantum computing being able to conquer the blockchains security. But as of now I believe it is through ...


1

It seems that your coins are indeed long gone, and have traveled to, and through various exchanges. There's really nothing you can do. If you're interested as to where they went, take a look here, https://www.walletexplorer.com/wallet/0be05327716173e1?from_address=1KM6rLnwgD67wRdMx9aVLRf1gfoNyCyv7Q


1

Looks like there are multiple cases of other customers reporting the site as a scam, so it's likely you'll never get a response from them, unfortunately. Because most cryptocurrency transactions are irreversible and often somewhat anonymous, it is important to first check the reputation of any entity you're dealing with.


1

Robber A now knows the address of the vendor. Robber A can sit and wait until someone (Victim A) purchases something from this address and has a very large Bitcoin balance. Most vendors would generate a new receiving address for each customer, as is recommended, which would stop this from happening. It is likely Victim A would also have generated multiple ...


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