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18

This is not a thorough schooling on Tor and only shows how to configure it to work together with Bitcoin Core. Bitcoin Core includes Tor integration When Tor is correctly setup on your system, Bitcoin Core automatically identifies Tor and creates an anonymous service. Little configuration is required to be 'off the grid' and, just a tiny bit more to be ...


8

Generally if you read BOLT 07 you will see that lightning nodes and channels can either be private or public. This is independent of the fact if they run on tor or not. The node announcment message explicitly supports announcing that it runs on tor as written in the BOLT 07 The following address descriptor types are defined: 1: ipv4; data = [4:...


7

It probably doesn't give you more security, and in fact if the mixer service's coin volumes are low, which they likely are, and dependent on whatever their turn around time may be, and dependent on how many coins you are asking them to mix, it is very possible for you to get back some of the same coins you sent to them. Unless they were verifiably in a ...


7

Try using bitwasp. It seems to provide a lot of features you need. Try it and let us know if it works. https://github.com/Bit-Wasp/BitWasp https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=109223.0


6

Setting up Vidalia Download the Tor Browser bundle Extract, go to the App folder, and double click Vidalia (and select "Run"). Let Vidalia load. If Vidalia doesn't work, run the "start-tor-browser" file at the top level of the extracted directory. Ensure that the port is 9150 (it usually is). If you're not sure, go to Edit>Preferences>Network>Settings and ...


5

Armory (in online mode) uses a full node. Full nodes relay transactions for other programs on the Bitcoin network, so by running Armory on Tor, you help other people send their transactions with possibly-improved privacy. Sending your own transactions through Tor with Armory can help prevent anyone from associating your IP address with your transaction, ...


5

Yes, since version 0.7 this is possible with the reference client. See the documentation about tor: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/master/doc/tor.md EDIT: also see https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Fallback_Nodes#Tor_nodes for a list of published onion nodes. The explanation on that site should be updated to reflected the built-in support for onion ...


5

Yes, the most notable one being this one. It illustrates that it is possible to associate transactions and addresses with forum users' identities, as well as connecting them to some organizations (including WikiLeaks, MyBitcoin, Slush's Pool etc). Tracking users by their IP is a bit harder, although during the work on my master thesis I was able to find an ...


5

The algorithm of registering .bit domain is described, for example, on dot-bit wiki. In short: Create new domain name with name_new command: ./namecoind name_new d/<name> Wait 12 or more blocks Actually register the domain with name_firstupdate, where <rand> is the second (shorter) hexadecimal string returned by name_new, and <json-value> ...


5

Well, if you are interested being as anonymous as possible, Tor is far more interesting. The VPN provider may not know who you are but it does know your IP address and the website you are visiting, which is almost the same if it comes in the hands of those you probably want to avoid knowing it. With Tor on the other hand, node know each other's IP address. ...


5

Basically as fast as a regular payment. The encrypted onion is being transported from node to node and will most likely leave the TOR network pretty quickly as many connections in lightning happen with direct IP connections. The path calculation is happening locally on your node and does not need communication with your peers at the time when the payment is ...


5

The onion routing in Lightning is based on the Sphinx Mix Format described in this paper. The situation is different from Tor We don't have entry and exit nodes in Lightning as all nodes are inside the Network. In Tor a new connection along the path is as easy as creating a TCP socket between the tor routing nodes. In Lightning a payment channel with ...


4

Using Tor doesn't help to prevent someone from linking addresses and guessing that they might be owned by the same person. It may help to keep someone from finding out who that owner actually is, where they live, etc.


4

Eligius has a hidden service for Tor mining.


4

BitInstant seems like a nice Tor-friendly option (they even accept deposits in cash): https://www.bitinstant.com/


4

The answer to your question is a clear NO, as two very different problems are being tackled but the onion routing in the TOR network and by the Onion Routing in BOLT 04. The idea of the Tor network is to hide your IP address. If you run your lightning node on a tor onion you will have a tor address and not even your channel partners can know where your ...


4

The paper you link to when used as advice rather than a scholarly investigation into the tradeoffs of different choices is outright bad advice. The attacks they give are largely generic and have little to do with tor itself, while use of tor provides non-trivial protection against many other vectors, and if used consistently and exclusively at least ...


4

Running lightning node over TOR is no different than running it over normal IP connection. Sending payment, fulfilling incoming payment, sending error messages etc. would happen in the exact same way in both cases. The only difference is that the above messages that you send to your peer will now happen over TOR network rather than a direct IP package. If ...


3

Low-latency transmissions over Tor can be defeated with a timing attack if you're connected to several of the attacker's nodes and the attacker is watching your transmissions at your ISP. The attacker can relay only blocks that he/she creates, putting you on a Bitcoin fork (separate from the main chain). After that you would be open to double-spending ...


3

No, it's a bad idea to run bitcoin over tor if your striving for anonymity. Here is a paper detailing the vulnerability. While Bitcoin provides some level of anonymity (or rather pseudonymity) by encouraging the users to have any number of random-looking Bitcoin addresses, recent research shows that this level of anonymity is rather low. This encourages ...


3

The Bitcoin client is designed as a peer-to-peer network. To join the network, you need to make a connection to a node that accepts incoming connections. To protect against certain types of Sybil attacks, a client tries to make 8 outbound connections to geographically diverse nodes. If you connect to the network through tor, you cannot accept inbound ...


3

Your settings look correct for the versions you would have been using, I do not know about bitseed.conf however. For a more up to date guide for setting up Bitcoin Core to run over Tor, you can try this question. Bitcoin Core now supports automatically configuring an ephemeral Tor service, for example.


3

Bitcoin Core no longer contains any mining code, so it's definitely not mining. (If it were, you'd see 100% CPU usage.) Mining has nothing to do with the behavior you are seeing. You're downloading the entire block chain (150+ GB) and checking it for validity, which explains the CPU usage. The UpdateTip message simply records that you've received a new ...


3

It generally takes a long time before the network "discovers" you're a good peer to connect to. It may be a few days before you get inbound connections. I'm able to connect to you.


2

Currently for a bitcoin node using Tor to connect to another bitcoin node it must pass through an exit node. There is work being performed on a resolution for this as described here: Supporting IPv6 in a somewhat general way would pave the way for bitcoin functioning for example as a Tor or I2P hidden service, by using onioncat-like tor-encoded-in-...


2

You could mine over TOR, but I would expect you would get much higher stales & downtime due to the high latencies of the TOR network. You can use the application ProxyChains to force any application on your computer to use a proxy (or a combination of proxies), simply add a new proxy to ProxyChains, 127.0.0.1 as IP and your TOR software's port as port, ...


2

Buying coins non-anonymously in the UK: Transferwise to Bitstamp's European account - £1 transfer fee, then <0.5% commission to buy. Spending: I guess you would use a mixer service


2

My suggestion: Don't use windows AT ALL. Easiest way to get hacked. also here's the answers you are looking for https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Tor specifically this line: "(after starting tor) Run bitcoind with -proxy=127.0.0.1:9050"


2

Unfortunately there is a library used in MultiBit/ bitcoinj for networking (called netty) that does not support SOCKS proxies. Thus currently you cannot set up MultiBit to use Tor. It is something we want to support so there are plans afoot to refactor the code and use a different networking library that does support SOCKS proxies.


2

VPNs are not absolutely untraceable like Tor (save in the case of rare targeted attacks and security breaches) so Tor >> VPN always and there's a good explanation for that on torproject.org . That being said, everything you do on Tor is really slow so it really depends on how important you think your anonymity is in regard to this transaction.


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