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8

Generally if you read BOLT 07 you will see that lightning nodes and channels can either be private or public. This is independent of the fact if they run on tor or not. The node announcment message explicitly supports announcing that it runs on tor as written in the BOLT 07 The following address descriptor types are defined: 1: ipv4; data = [4:...


5

Basically as fast as a regular payment. The encrypted onion is being transported from node to node and will most likely leave the TOR network pretty quickly as many connections in lightning happen with direct IP connections. The path calculation is happening locally on your node and does not need communication with your peers at the time when the payment is ...


5

The onion routing in Lightning is based on the Sphinx Mix Format described in this paper. The situation is different from Tor We don't have entry and exit nodes in Lightning as all nodes are inside the Network. In Tor a new connection along the path is as easy as creating a TCP socket between the tor routing nodes. In Lightning a payment channel with ...


4

The paper you link to when used as advice rather than a scholarly investigation into the tradeoffs of different choices is outright bad advice. The attacks they give are largely generic and have little to do with tor itself, while use of tor provides non-trivial protection against many other vectors, and if used consistently and exclusively at least ...


4

Running lightning node over TOR is no different than running it over normal IP connection. Sending payment, fulfilling incoming payment, sending error messages etc. would happen in the exact same way in both cases. The only difference is that the above messages that you send to your peer will now happen over TOR network rather than a direct IP package. If ...


3

It generally takes a long time before the network "discovers" you're a good peer to connect to. It may be a few days before you get inbound connections. I'm able to connect to you.


2

Turns out my node had auto-banned localhost (127.0.0.1) at some point. As a result bitcoind was rejecting all incoming connections from the tor service, including my friend's attempts. I removed the ban and he is able to connect.


2

Yes. The channels are announced with the node ID. If the ip Address changes we get a new node announcement message so it takes some time until the information is through the gossip protocol. But moving a node to a new server is no problem


2

Using a mixer helps preserve your financial privacy. The question is: who are you protecting your privacy from? Bitcoin transactions are public record, so anybody can view any historical transaction at their leisure. So when considering your privacy, there are a few different situations worth exploring, for example: An unrelated third party is looking at ...


1

When your client start the connection with another peer it is outbound, otherwise it is inbound. If you want to be sure that your tor node is properly setup and that other peer can connect to you, check: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Setting_up_a_Tor_hidden_service


1

Your VPN provider at least is in a position to deanonymize you. Therefore, I would rather use TOR. It's not infallible, but many people have used it successfully to achieve relative anonymity. Here's a short guide to setting up bitcoin core with TOR As Saxtheowl has already mentioned, however, both a VPN and TOR can only hide your IP address. There are many ...


1

This is not only related to Lightning but remains true for any critical application that you run on your PC when connected to your home network. If your home network is compromised then an attacker can possibly escalate privileges and compromise the machine on which your lightning node is running (as well as other critical applications). Lightning is thought ...


1

The guide you linked is a good start. The next step is to broadcast these IPs using the externalip flag in the lnd.conf file. A sample lnd.conf file that enables connections (using default port 9735) via Tor, IPv4, and IPv6 should include the following: (replace the 3 fake addresses with your own): tor.active=1 tor.v3=1 tor.privatekeypath=~/.lnd/...


1

The Lightning Network does not have the same problems as Bitcoin because all communication is done over an encrypted and authenticated protocol. Lightning Nodes are identified by their public keys, such that communication only occurs between somebody with the matching private key to the public key expected by the connection initiator, making MITM attacks not ...


1

The bitcoin key could sign a message containing the onion address. There are several other alternatives but there isn't any way to do this without the key holder producing a message of some kind.


1

If you are running -onlynet=onion, there is no need to open any router ports. Perhaps I misunderstand your question. If your chain state is caught up, and bitcoind+Tor is properly configured, you should be serving data to other nodes, even behind an otherwise locked-down home router. What result do you get when running $ bitcoin-cli getpeerinfo | grep ...


1

Here is a simple guide on how to build and run your own home node behind a tor. https://github.com/bitembassy/home-node


1

BTCPay Server "is a self-hosted, open-source cryptocurrency payment processor. It's secure, private, censorship-resistant and free." There are still some outstanding issues around Tor though.


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