11

Best estimates on effective blocksize with SegWit are 1.6-2.0 MB. Current transactions/second possible are around 3 tx/s. Given that the effective increase is 1.6 - 2.0x, the transactions/second are also the same multiple giving us somewhere around 5-6 tx/s. The second question is harder to answer. There's a reason I wrote "effective blocksize" since ...


3

You are equating the value of a currency with the performance of just one way to exchange that currency. There are poor ways to exchange dollars as well. Also, I'm not sure what you mean by "invest in such service". You can invest in bitcoin-related businesses and you can invest in bitcoin, the currency. But I don't see how you can invest in the bitcoin ...


2

Bitcoin for Point-of-Sale Bitcoin is inherently ill-suited as a form of instant payment. This is due to transactions needing confirmations before they become reliable which even at best times can take between several minutes and an hour. Before a transaction is confirmed, it is merely a declaration of intent open to replacement by another transaction ...


2

The smallest transaction that would commonly occur in the wild is a P2PKH transaction with one input and two outputs (send amount and change output). A P2PKH input has 148 bytes, a P2PKH output has 34 bytes and the transaction overhead is 10 bytes, 148 bytes + 2*34 bytes + 10 bytes = 226 bytes, in the case when no change output is required, this could ...


2

tldr - BTC = 3.33-6.66tx/second, BCH = 27 tx/second For non-segwit-enabled Bitcoin nodes, transaction capacity is determined by Bitcoin's 1MB block size limit. A 1MB block will contain about 2000 transactions on average (see here). Because 1 block is mined every 10 minutes, this works out to roughly 3.33 tx/second. BCH transaction capacity is determined by ...


2

2-3000 transactions can be included in each block. But that does not mean that only that many transactions can be made every 10 minutes. There can be, and has been, several thousands more transactions made than can fit into the next block. That just means that several thousand transactions won't be confirmed in the next block and will have to wait for blocks ...


2

When a transaction is broadcast to the network it enters the "mempool". Every full node maintains a pool of unconfirmed transactions in RAM memory. Newly broadcast transactions are relayed from node to node through the network. A typical mining node selects, from its mempool, as many transactions (with attractive fees) as will fit in a block and then ...


1

The lifecycle of a transaction is the following: Transaction creation: A sender creates a transaction, he includes a list of recipients, determines which previous transaction outputs to spend, and signs it. The difference between output total and input total determines the transaction fee. Relay: The sender submits the transaction to the Bitcoin network. ...


1

Transactions selected in mining blocks is not like a queue, where you wait your time and get to the front eventually. Fees are not mandatory, but should be included in every transaction, if you have sent none, or low fees, you can still be selected (although it's highly unlikely), but the miner would be silly as they could just take the higher fee offered ...


1

You're looking at bitcoin's main value as a medium of exchange. It's actually more useful as a store of value. Think more Gold than Paypal. There are two reasons for you buy bitcoins: To purchase a good or service (usually because you can't purchase it using other means) To store value If it's the first, you're not really "investing" in the coin at all, ...


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