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A coinbase transaction is allowed to have as many outputs as the miner wishes so long as the total amount in those outputs does not exceed the block subsidy + transaction fees for that block. Thus a miner could create a coinbase transaction which has more than one output which pays to himself and someone else. It doesn't matter who the recipients of the ...


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"Buy the dip" is used by traders even for legacy markets and nothing specific for Bitcoin. This will undoubtedly incur high network fees For paying less in fees while moving bitcoin from/to exchange do the following: Use P2P exchanges: Bisq and HodlHodl Use open source bitcoin wallets with active development and support for segwit Use RBF for ...


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This occurs because Bitcoin Core's coin selection algorithm tries to have a minimum change of 0.01 BTC. Fees are subtracted from the change output so the result is that the change output has a lower value, but before fees, it will try to for the change output to be at least 0.01 BTC. As we can see in your transaction, the change before fees is approximately ...


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Transactions vary a lot in data size, so it's usually more useful to compare the feerates of transactions rather than absolute fees. For example, a transaction that batches fifty payments may pay the same feerate, but a significantly higher fee, while still having a lower fee per payment than a transaction that performs a single payment. You may find this ...


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So this gives very useful info, but if I want to see the distribution of all historical transaction fees on the blockchain, how could I do that? The information doesn't look useful. Distribution of fee rates used by unconfirmed transactions can be checked on many websites like https://mempool.space/ https://mempool.observer/ https://btc.bitaps.com/ Fees ...


2

Nevermind. I found out that it is a 2 factor authentication fee. At first I just didn't expect it to be this much.


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Electrum used both UTXO, even if only one was needed, to protect your privacy albeit at the expense of higher fee. This is from the Electrum source code and explain this choice: Attempts to better preserve user privacy. First, if any coin is spent from a user address, all coins are. Compared to spending from other addresses to make up an amount, this reduces ...


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Selecting final will disable RBF for the transaction and you will not be increase the fee anymore. Example: I did a transaction 7d1a7ecd1a68443c07f89f38180d3f3dc945edb2784ebfb7f7c113842d7d8509 with fee rate 1 sat/vByte, increased the fee rate to 3 sat/vBbyte and replace the transaction with d47e59db69c91f3e653da9c5ed0e0f9fc8fdc4422a4e8650d4d6b66c1db60f18 and ...


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The transaction fees can be calculated by subtracting each transaction's inputs from its outputs – that difference is the fee. I would guess your best bet is to clone Bitcoin Core, download the entire blockchain, and start parsing the data yourself. If that sounds like too much, I would start here and then ask another question once you get a full node up and ...


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