7

When you spend from a Bitcoin address, your transaction includes both the public key corresponding to the hashed address you're trying to spend from, as well as a signature that can be verified with that public key. Your link is to a block, which is not signed itself. However, let's look at a transaction from your block: https://www.blockchain.com/btc/tx/...


5

Advantages of OP_CHECKMULTISIG over Shamir Secret Sharing for k-of-n: There is no need to reconstruct the actual secret key on one specific machine. With SSS, you're inherently relying on that one machine being able to verify that what it's going to sign is what is intended - otherwise you may e.g. be sending your entire balance instead of just the payment ...


5

This is normal. Here you can see a chart of average transacted value every day: https://blockchair.com/bitcoin/charts/average-transaction-amount-btc There are 2 things that contribute to this: The very large transactions skewing the numbers. This becomes more apparent if you take a look at the median transaction values, which are around the 0.02-0.03 BTC ...


4

A bitcoin transaction will create outputs, which can later be used as input to a new transaction. Each output will be locked to what is called a scriptpubkey, which basically sets up the cryptographic puzzle that must be satisfied (ie, return true when run) in order for those coins to be spent. Any transaction spending those coins will need to provide a ...


4

The amount for the block reward is what is created, there is no additional created for any reason. If the block reward is 6.25 BTC, that is exactly what the miner is paid, and nobody else.


4

Why did the transaction was accepted by the network despite not working as intended The network does not check the validity of output scripts. An output script can contain pretty much any data and the transaction will still be consensus valid. But your transaction is not actually invalid. It's just like a bare multisig now, but since the pubkeys are hashes, ...


4

The flaw in your thinking is that you assume your transactions will be confirmed. That is not the case. There is no guarantee that a transaction will ever be confirmed, and in fact, if the fee is too low, it is almost guaranteed that the transaction will never confirm. You should care because the person you are sending Bitcoin to cares that it confirms. You ...


4

No, you shouldn't need to sign the transaction until it's completely crafted. Bitcoin core can handle this for you! An easier flow when creating a transaction is Create raw transaction. Don't add any inputs yet. Fund raw transaction. This will select inputs for you. Add subtractFeeFromOutputs of the output you want to subtract the final fee from. The docs ...


3

How to set the absolute fee The transaction fee is implicitly defined by the difference between the sum of input and the sum of output amounts. fee = Σ(inputs) - Σ(outputs) Since you are building your transactions explicitly, you can set the exact transaction fee by defining the corresponding specific amounts of the outputs for the recipient(s) and the ...


2

To answer your question exactly: why were they made non-standard? Because originally (after a few vulnerabilities in the Script logic in 2010), all scripts were made non-standard except a few whitelisted ones. Since then, more and more groups of scripts have been added to that category (including almost all P2SH scripts, with a few exceptions). Why have bare ...


2

It's simply the address(es) that you want to send Bitcoins from.


2

Is this actually possible? Yes. Transactions may have arbitrarily many inputs and outputs (subject to them fitting inside a block, of course). The inputs must be UTXOs that you can provide signatures for (coins you own), and the outputs will be new UTXOs, each of which can be associated with any address(es) you like (that is, the coins you own can be sent ...


2

Where does it get its data? It gets it from the APIs of those exchanges. For example, here's the Coinbase/GDAX API for order book information: https://docs.pro.coinbase.com/#get-product-order-book AFAIU all the bitcoin transactions inside an exchange are just bookkeeping they do and the only real blockchain-recorded transactions are when you send bitcoin ...


2

The actual purpose of a regular transaction is to create one or more recipient outputs to pay someone. One could therefore think of the recipient outputs as the "payload" of a transaction, and the remainder of the transaction as the overhead to achieve the transaction's purpose. Let's assume that we send a single payment in a transaction with one ...


2

Once you use a BTC receiving address once, any good wallet will not display the same address again; they'll display the next address in the chain (since your seed derives to a large chain of different addresses). The coins are not lost, your wallet balance should still be there, and the wallet will still track the old address, it just won't display the old ...


2

Transactions themselves do not compress well, they are mostly cryptographic hashes and signatures. You can save a couple of bytes here and there by bit-packing, but generally speaking there's not a lot of reason to introduce massive complexity for moderate savings. Many wallets today grind the signatures to save an extra byte, but this is possible without ...


1

solved Script redeemScript = ScriptBuilder.createP2WPKHOutputScript(key); Script witnessScript = ScriptBuilder.createP2PKHOutputScript(key); TransactionSignature signature = tx.calculateWitnessSignature(inputIndex, key, witnessScript, txIn.getValue(), SigHash.ALL, false); txIn.setWitness(TransactionWitness.redeemP2WPKH(signature, key)); txIn....


1

What you're asking for is called Oracle and as we speak there are no perfect implementations of it. It's an ongoing problem to be solved for example it's hard to weed out false information. I advise you to read more about it outside this forum.


1

Typically there's a seed which is displayed as a sequence of 12-24 words that is used to derive addresses/private keys in different chains. Different coins use different derivation paths which are hardcoded in the wallet so even if two coins use the same address format the generated addresses will be different.


1

A standard transaction may use up to 400,000 weight units (=100,000 vbytes). Every transaction must have at least one input and at least one output. It is possible to perform multiple payments in one transaction by adding several outputs that each pay one recipient. This is often referred to as payment batching. Usually, a change output is used to return the ...


1

According to the Blockchain record for address 1MhnRVvDTHGMSRdSRU5sP7vFH3aMExBAc9 Date Transaction ID Confirms Description 2021-01-25 12:56 8c038b...c3fb2f 2691 Money received from bc1qq9...6cfvgq 2021-02-02 15:33 1708b5...935604 0 Failed low-fee transaction, now invalid 2021-02-12 14:08 a77bb6...26273d 5 Money sent to 1EqnaM...WQGW6y how can I get ...


1

I know about this one by Binance but haven't tried it myself and don't know if it's been audited: https://github.com/binance-chain/tss-lib


1

From a novice, what it means that if someone who isn't bitcoin savvy accepted bitcoin on the deprecated block and gave that person something of value, that person is out of luck, you just lost that item of value. Previous answers eluded to it, but, simpletons like me look at "So what does this really mean". It means, when you get paid in BitCoins, ...


1

If you want to keep your cold wallet cold, then you shouldn't be importing privkeys to an online device. If the goal is to ultimately send BTC out of your wallet(s), then you can skip the hot-wallet step entirely: just send from the cold wallet to the final recipient(s). Otherwise, having to export and handle the privkeys will create additional security ...


1

If the hardware device is lost or stolen (don't forget it's "sleek and small") it would impossible to retrieve the wallet as the PK is only be stored on the device itself? (If it can be stored anywhere else you are no longer resistant to malware attacks) All current hardware wallets use BIP 39 mnemonics. This is a sequence of 12 or 24 words which ...


1

I assume you mean that you have a a blockchain.info/.com wallet. You will have to log into the wallet and initiate a transaction. If you cannot do that, and you do not have a wallet backup, then you are likely out of luck, the coins would be effectively lost. You could attempt to contact their customer service to see if they can somehow let you log into the ...


1

Right now, the top two alternatives to Taproot & Schnorr Signatures rely on multiparty ECDSA (elliptic curve digital signature algorithm) also known as threashold ECDSA. Threshold ECDSA has two main functions: The first function is to spread out key generation across multiple machines. This makes it so that no single party is ever made aware of the full ...


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