5

I don't know. As an approximation, we can look at what's written in Bitcoin Core: /** New transactions start as UNCONFIRMED. At BlockConnected, * they will transition to CONFIRMED. In case of reorg, at BlockDisconnected, * they roll back to UNCONFIRMED. If we detect a conflicting transaction at * block connection, we update conflicted tx and its ...


4

When it comes to soft forks, backwards compatible does not mean that old nodes will follow the new rules - that would mean that the new rules are already implemented. Rather backwards compatible means that following the new rules does not make previously invalid transactions valid, i.e. old nodes will still see those transactions as valid. So what ends up ...


3

How does miner order transactions if two are unrelated? e.g., A pays C, X pays Y. I assume changing the order in the block will change the hash, so I am curious how Bitcoin code combines them in which order. Transactions can be ordered in a block in any way a miner wishes to so long as a transaction which spends an output created by another transaction in ...


3

It is not dangerous in that the private key can be revealed. Rather it is dangerous in that an attacker can make a version of that transaction which is functionally the same but has a slightly different signature and so has a different transaction id. This issue is a part of a set of issues referred to as transaction malleability. Transaction malleability is ...


3

Exchanges interact with the Bitcoin network, and the blockchain, whenever people deposit on them, or withdraw BTC from them. You can think of exchanges as services which are effectively like a bank account for multiple currencies. For example, they may offer a USD account and a BTC account. And they let you: Deposit or withdraw USD (using wire transfers or ...


3

1 ... I've read some articles saying that a transaction that has only 1-2 inputs but comparatively too large number of output addresses (e.g. 60) can be considered suspicious That doesn't seem right to me at all. There are many genuine and innocuous reasons for constructing such a transaction: an exchange batching withdrawals, paying dividends to ...


3

In theory, you pay whatever fee you want, in order to bid for space in the blockchain. Miners are free to include or ignore your transaction, but a higher fee likely incentivizes them to accept it. In practice, what matters is the fee per vbyte (feerate) of the transaction (vbyte is defined as the size in bytes of the entire transaction, but every byte in ...


2

A transaction itself doesn't have a storage structure for timestamp. So the transactions don't know when they're created. But, after bundling the transactions into a block and while solving the hash problem to solve the block, the miner inserts timestamp at the block level. So, even if in reality chronologically earlier transaction comes later, it will be ...


2

what exactly is flow involved in transfer of a bitcoin from my account on one exchange to someone else's on another exchange? Your intended recipient will have requested exchange 2 to generate a receiving address for your intended transaction. This receiving address is owned by exchange 2. The recipient will pass this address to you in any way that suits ...


2

My question is that why does the locking script for multsig address contain their public keys instead of PubKeyHashes(addresses)? Why would it? The reason for using a hash of the public key in P2PKH is because it resulted in shorter addresses (in Satoshi's time, before compressed public keys, public keys were 65 bytes, so using a 20-byte hash was ...


1

There is no such thing as a Bitcoin transaction URL. Bitcoin transactions are identified by a transaction-ID which looks like 31144ef6faaad902f3ec4e6f6241aa09f9ea08374abb67242039f3285414cd2e There exist web sites run by various organisations that allow you to search for Bitcoin transaction data by transaction-ID. These websites are examples of blockchain ...


1

Each node is in contact with a handful of peers. If no miners include your transaction, the money never left your wallet. Propagation may take a few tens of seconds to reach most of the network. See How long does it take to propagate a newly created block to the entire Bitcoin network and why? Actually length of chain is not important, that's a shorthand ...


1

This is not a supported feature. Only the wallet tracks total balances (per wallet even, not per address), and only does so for your own keys/addresses (including imported "watch only" keys/addresses). Other software exists that provides this functionality.


1

To ensure that the transaction is not tampered with, the owner will SIGN the transaction and then broadcast to the network. Changing any part of the transaction WILL change the transaction's signature and other nodes will DROP that corrupted transactions as message(transaction) has changed. But still the possibility of tampering exists, Because the ...


1

When person A "Sends" their transaction, they must first sign it, and then broadcast it to the mempool. The signing ensures that the transaction is not valid if any of the signed portions are changed. Thus, if you change a scriptPubKey, the signature they added to the transaction will be rendered invalid, and when you attempt to broadcast your ...


1

The output is in JSON format; [] is a list containing no items.


1

Can I speed up this process of synchronization? Things that can help in speeding up sync: RAM, dbcache and threads https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/a/107960/ Its done around 85%, how long it can take (it took 2 month to increase 5%) Its difficult to predict this but should not take more than few days Can I cancel the synchronizing in between without ...


1

One part of coinbase transaction is p2pkh ScriptPubKey (according to the book i read). That is (or at least, was) commonly the case, but there is no such requirement. Suppose i have all the data needed to build coinbase transaction (version,output,ect) except the p2pkh ScriptPubKey , and i have my address that i generate using bitcoin rpc getnewaddress , ...


1

If you don't have an actual backup of your wallet.dat file from 2009 (or whatever time you were using/mining Bitcoin), there is no way to recover your funds. Sorry. Ownership of BTC is defined by access to the private keys, which software early on (and some, still) stores in a wallet file. Without that actual wallet file, you don't have the keys, and there ...


1

can A say "I paid B with btc amount 1.55821903" in any ways? No. A used a 1.55824169 BTC "coin" but sent themselves change in the form of a 1.55200322 BTC "coin". B only ever received a 0.00621581 BTC "coin" and nothing else. B never had any control over the amount of change. At no time did B have any control over the ...


1

addressHash is the data output by pybtc. The data is a hash of the public key or script. It is contained in the address. And also parts of scriptPubkey(locking script). For P2PKH and P2WPKH, it is Hash160(public key) For P2SH, it is Hash160(script) For P2WSH, it is SHA256(script)


1

This is my opinion because "safest" can be different for other people. Available hardware wallets that most of the Bitcoin users prefer using for long term (I have sorted them based on security): Coldcard Trezor Bitbox Jade Although all these hardware wallets are secure, coldcard is at top because it's only used for bitcoin, tried and tested for ...


1

What is static pattern Each type of Bitcoin transaction has a certain pattern, the chunk of data can be broken down into pieces. The size, form and sequence of these these pieces are a pattern. Static means this pattern does not change from one transaction to another of the same type. All transactions of the same type have the same pattern. why it is not ...


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