6

Txid can’t be missing since it’s just a hash of the transaction data


3

Transactions have no order until they are included in a valid block. That is the entire function of the blockchain: to act as a distributed timestamp server for transactions. can miners reverse the chronological order when packing block ? A miner can order transactions in a block however they would like (assuming that the block remains valid otherwise, of ...


3

A txid is calculated from the transaction data by hashing the transaction (excluding the witness). It's not part of the transaction, but rather derived from the transaction. You can rely on it being available for every transaction.


3

Observe that the type of the output is: "type": "pubkey" Pay-to-Public-Key (P2PK) outputs do not have addresses. They pay directly to a public key rather than the hash of the public key, as the name suggests. Bitcoin addresses encode public key hashes, for example, addresses starting with a 1 are known as Pay-to-Public-Key-Hash (P2PKH) ...


2

No, when you buy Bitcoin from an exchange, it is not an on-chain transaction, the exchange simply updates your account balances in their database. It only becomes an on-chain transaction when you either deposit or withdraw Bitcoin to or from a Bitcoin address, from your exchange account.


2

Buying and selling of bitcoin is done using exchanges. If it is a centralized exchange you will do KYC, use bank account to transfer money and deposit/withdraw bitcoin. Only bitcoin transactions are available on Bitcoin blockchain and everything else stays with the exchange. Most of the exchanges will share it with government when required. If it is ...


2

According to some of his other writings, Satoshi had a working prototype when he wrote the whitepaper¹. The whitepaper gives a high-level overview of how Bitcoin works, and to that end, Satoshi simplified some of the concepts. For example, "We define an electronic coin as a chain of digital signatures." is a simplification, because transactions can ...


2

A common scriptPubKey format, known as Pay-to-Public-Key-Hash (P2PKH), has the following form: OP_DUP OP_HASH160 <push of 20-byte public key hash> OP_EQUALVERIFY OP_CHECKSIG The hash of the public key is formed by ripemd-160(sha-256(compressed public key)). You can find the hex encoding of the opcodes here: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Script The amount ...


2

This is a pretty broad question that also has some opinion/preference nuances. To try to answer your question, yes, a new address for each new deposit. Whether these funds by default go to a hot wallet or cold wallet is a preference and will differ depending on the exchange. I would suggest that best practice would be to have all user deposit funds going to ...


2

Bitcoin uses a UTXO model – all bitcoin exists in the form of unspent transaction outputs (UTXOs). So there are a number of different scenarios depending on how many UTXOs you have and what you do with them: You have a single* UTXO of 1 BTC. You create a single transaction paying 0.2 BTC to Alice, 0.2 BTC to Bob and 0.6 BTC back to yourself. A transaction ...


2

A block must have exactly one coinbase transaction as its first transaction. This transaction may collect the transaction fees and create new coins according to the subsidy. It can assign those funds to one or multiple outputs. If the block includes any segwit transactions, it also has to include an op_return output with a witness commitment. There have been ...


1

To my understanding, a miner will define the output address for the payout of the coinbase transaction prior to solving the hash and sharing the new block. Changing the output value of the coinbase transaction would break protocol rules and the block would be invalid and not added on top of the chain.


1

The leaf nodes are in the same order as the transactions in the block. This order is chosen by the miners (other than the coinbase being first). Please see here for more info: https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/a/46768/51948 CVE-2012-2459 is detailed here. The relevant fix: The problem was fixed by Gavin Andresen in Bitcoin commit be8651d [1] by rejecting ...


1

You can use my script for parsing the blockchain raw database. It's here https://github.com/ragestack/blockchain-parser available to download. If you know approximately the starting block with TXs you need or the starting time, it will help you to set the limits for searching transactions, you can filter them from the output results.


1

https://mempool.space/docs/api/rest The mempool.space api should suite your needs...


1

Questions looking for service provider availability/reviews are off-topic on this site, but luckily you can simply run a bitcoin full node to obtain and validate this information for yourself! Even better, since you are validating the information yourself, there is no risk of being fed incorrect information from some third party API. To accomplish this, you'...


1

BitGo generally uses 2-of-3 multisig transactions. That means that when you send a transaction, you must provide one of the signatures, and BitGo will add the second signature once you submit the partially signed transaction to the BitGo API. Since you need to use your own private key material to generate a signature, the signature has to be created client-...


1

Bitcoin transactions are (intentionally) devoid of extraneous information such as 'sender' and 'recipient'. The inputs/outputs do not contain any information about who owns them, and neither does the ordering of those inputs outputs (eg, FIFO is meaningless in terms of analyzing bitcoin transactions). That said, while this information is not available ...


1

Is your core compiled with the wallet? Because gettransaction RPC get wallet transactions, and hence need wallet capabilities. For general transactions, you should use getrawtransaction instead. I ran it here (with wallet enabled) and works just fine.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible