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The first output of transaction b53e3bc5…5377f141 has the following scriptPubKey: OP_PUSHNUM_1 OP_PUSHBYTES_32 01010101…0101010101 The segwit softfork in 2017 defined versioning rules for all native segwit outputs, but only defined spending rules for version 0.¹ This output worth 5431 satoshis matches the native segwit schema, but the leading OP_PUSHNUM_1 ...


9

Of course, if there was even one node which didn't want to restrict the addresses activity, the transactions would eventually get through, but these neutral nodes might notice that that address has a harder time making transactions, so those neutral nodes might realize that they can demand a higher price for transactions from that address. I think you ...


9

The solution to this problem is: anyone can become a miner, in theory. Proof of work replaces a central party that can censor with a consensus protocol, where miners jointly decide what transactions get processed, and in what order. But that's just part of the picture - if we fully trusted miners (or a majority of them) to never behave maliciously, we could ...


6

Transactions include a fee, which miners are allowed to claim if they include that transaction in their block. While it is legal to not include any transactions, miners who do this will miss out on the fees. Furthermore, the computational cost needed to verify a transaction is absolutely negligible compared to the work of producing PoW. What is more ...


5

To add to Murch's answer: The output was created by Matthew Zipkin to test support for sending to SegWit v1 support on purse.io. This was done in the context of the Bitcoin Optech Compatibility Matix. Here is a screenshot of the purse.io withdrawal that was added in PR 303 to the Bitcoin Optech website.


4

No, because that would just result in miners stuffing their own blocks with back-and-forth transactions. Every block has a finite amount of space (called "weight"), and every transaction has a certain weight based on its complexity. The sum of the weights of the transactions in a block cannot exceed 4000000. Transactions also each define a fee. ...


4

Correct. A single miner can slow down a transaction simply by not including it in their blocks. Of course, unless they possess enough hashrate compared to everyone else, the effect will not really be noticeable. Completely blocking a transaction would become possible with 51% or more of the network hashrate, as any chain including a "forbidden" ...


3

Transactions pay transaction fees to the miner which includes that transaction in a block. So miners are incentivized to include transactions because it means they get paid more. This becomes more important as the block subsidy goes down as then a miner's revenue will primarily come from transaction fees rather than the generation of new Bitcoin.


3

Just to clarify how Bitcoin works: How can I retrieve it? You don't ever really retrieve Bitcoin money, it is always kept track of in the list of transactions that almost every Bitcoin user has their own copy of (or access to a trusted copy). This list of transactions is a transaction-journal that is called the blockchain, but it isn't owned or controlled ...


2

Christian Decker answered this on the Stephan Livera podcast. ANYPREVOUT (as you probably already know if you have read BIP 118) relaxes the requirement for an input to spend a particular output. Instead a specific signature can be used to spend any UTXO with the same script. Rather than binding by both the explicit reference (e.g. transaction 100 connects ...


1

yes it can! As part of the offers proposal Rusty is currently suggesting to add a standard for so called onion messages to BOLT 07. You can find more details in the open pull request: https://github.com/lightningnetwork/lightning-rfc/pull/798/files


1

I assume that you are talking about a Pay to Public Key Hash (P2PKH) address. Cryptographic hash functions have the pre-image resistance property: Given a hash value h, it should be difficult to find a message m for which h = hash(m). P2PKH addresses encode a locking script that commits funds to the hash of a public key. Given that the address only ...


1

If you don't have your private key, and the custodial wallet that does have your private key is no longer accessible, then you cannot move your coins or "cash out". Invest in a hardware wallet, and transfer your coins out of any custodial wallet if you plan on hodling the coins. That way, if you ever need to cash out, you can.


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