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Occasionally, minor alternate chains emerge if multiple blocks are found for a given blockheight. Usually, these alternate chains only last for a single blocked, and are quickly dropped once another block has been found, allowing one chain to become longer (and thus have more work). More rarely, these chains might last for a couple of blocks. Block 525890 ...


5

The hourly average fee when this question was posted was between 9 and 10 Satoshi per Byte (sat/B). The latest TX's that I just randomly checked all had 10.03 sat/B fee which is higher than the 4.5 sat/B that you sent. Transactions are at a hourly peak right now. Wait it out and it'll probably go through in the next couple of hours as the mempool empties. ...


4

Blockchain Explorer says received but it's not received yet! That's not how Bitcoin works. All computer-based wallets, including your friend's, have a copy of the blockchain (or have indirect access to a copy). If the blockchain includes your transaction, then the money has been received. All copies of the blockchain are eventually identical, only the last ...


4

The method described in the post has nothing to to with OP_RETURN, but is concerned with the SIGOP limits in a block. Each block has a limit on the number of SIGOPs that can be present in transactions in that block. Signature validation is a CPU intensive operation, and the limit exists to ensure that no block gets too big to validate on regular hardware. ...


3

Your transaction paid a fee of 1674 satoshis for 372 bytes, or a fee rate of 4.5 satoshis per byte, which was a reasonable estimate in the past hour (via https://mempool.space/tv): There was just a slow block with #600,283 taking 37 minutes to be found (via https://blockchair.com) and it looks like your transaction would have been exactly in that little ...


3

Replacing an unconfirmed transaction with another one isn't really double spending, as Chytrik mentioned. Several of the older wallets do support dropping unconfirmed txs, freeing up the inputs another transaction. In my experience, Bitcoin Core and Electrum tend to be the best candidates for such actions. Newer, more consumer facing wallets, such as ...


3

Once spent, the wallet removes the UTXO from its cache of unspent transactions. The transaction is not removed from the general database (the blockchain or block index). Full nodes running with txindex=1 keep every transaction forever. Some wallets though optimize the database to recover disk space - but this is a wallet-specific optimization and not part of ...


3

This is not possible. Only the coinbase transaction is allowed to have a null, or non-existent input, and the only way to create that is to mine a block. Moreover, it must adhere to additional rules, such as the inclusion of the block height in the coinbase section of the vin (the scriptSig) as per BIP 34. Unless you happen to run a mining pool, or have ...


3

How Bitcoin dose find and verify UTXO? By Bitcoin, I think you must mean "Bitcoin core" - the Bitcoin wallet software derived from the original reference implementation by Satoshi Nakamoto. The word Bitcoin also encompasses the specific set of concepts outlined in the Bitcoin whitepaper, the network protocol definitions, the Bitcoin improvement proposals (...


3

No, you cannot assume this. There are a number of ways in which individual inputs may belong to different wallets/owners. For example: They could come from a hosted wallet or exchange, where inputs may span coins deposited by thousands of individual users, and selected for a transaction with no particular relation to the user making that transaction ...


3

Bitcoin does not work on an account model but operates on an UTXO (unspent transaction output) model. When you send bitcoins to an address, what you are essentially doing is locking those bitcoins in a mathematical equation. Spending those coins requires that you provide the correct unlocking condition (most often signature and public key associated with ...


2

Yes. You always have two accounts on LND (ZAP interfaces over rpc with your self hosted lnd node). One account is your lightning wallet where channel management is done, and the other is your on chain wallet. Depending on where your balance is there are different processes for moving the balance to your on chain wallet (which is what I assume you want). ...


2

As difficulty adjusts automatically, it is indeed possible to run a mostly functional network with the bare minimum hardware required for storage and networking. Naturally, this network will have next to no protection against a 51% attack, as anyone with a faster computer (or computers) will easily be able to outdo your bare minimum hardware. Running it ...


2

In the original source code there were little restrictions on what could be in the coinbase data of the coinbase transaction. I think the only restriction was that the coinbase data should be between 2 to 100 bytes. However, this lack of restriction on what can be within the coinbase data brought up a vulnerability. It was perfectly legal for miners to ...


2

That has to be a parsing error from blockchain.com side. It would be indeed a double-spend and therefore block 525891 would have been invalid. If you check other explorers (e.g. blockstream or blockcypher) you'll see how they had only included it in block 525891. Personally I find blockchain.info's explorer not to be too reliable.


2

The transaction is confirmed. Make sure that you have sent to the correct address (your friend's address 37ZyDkjmMEkTVjeuLcjH3p5AQEZF5tpr1E). If you are sure then your friend is trying to scam you because in transaction https://blockstream.info/tx/cb2b8b9fe545ba2705f9831e33417cdf3c4c749eb738cb359d3c3af4834b2768 the UTXO you sent to your friend has been ...


2

Multisig inputs typically have multiple participants. Usually multiple parties are required to sign the transaction.


2

There is a similar question from 6 years ago with different options and answers Is there a remote, trustless bitcoin API that doesn't require anything (blockchain/SPV headers) to be stored locally? Otherwise I suppose the options havent changed much, unless maybe the pruning mod which allow you to run a lightweight bitcoin node (550mb instead of 250giga+...


2

Bitcoin is a gossip network and relays transaction or blocks on a best effort basis. Hence you cannot determine the probability of one transaction being seen by the network versus the other. Now in terms of mining the transactions in a block there are a couple of cases that needs to be considered. For assumption sake let us assume that we are considering a ...


2

gettransaction is a wallet RPC. It only works for transactions your wallet knows about. Presumably this is not the case for a transaction from 2013. getrawtransaction is a node RPC. It works for all transactions, but needs help to find them. One possibility is to enable the transaction index (put txindex=1 in bitcoin.conf, or -txindex on the bitcoind ...


1

Of course, you can add as many UTXO's as will fit in a block. In fact, you usually have to because you don't always have a UTXO for the exact amount you are trying to spend. Note that more UTXO will result in a higher transaction fee because the fee is based on the current market fee rate (satoshi/kB) and more UTXO increases the kB. For example, check out ...


1

Internally, Bitcoin does not have the concept of scriptPubKey type. To the system, scriptPubKey is simply a mathematical equation into which some bitcoins have been locked (UTXO) and the spender must satisfy the unlocking conditions, which most of the times are the signature(s) and public key(s), in order to spend those bitcoins. These basic construct can be ...


1

I want add a clarification inside your good post by Jose Fonseca, the UTXO is a TransactionOutput, this structure has only 2 value, the amount and the scriptPubKey. The link to the previous transaction is inside the TransactionInput so, the TransactionInput and the transaction output is contained inside the Raw transaction. So inside the cache is present ...


1

I want to transfer coins to multiple exchanges, how can I do it? Just open accounts on all those exchanges and then get deposit addresses. Transfer funds howefver you like. Can I split coins from one wallet into the exchanges? Yes. Do I need a specific kind of wallet? You can just withdraw from wherever your coins are now to your deposit addresses ...


1

In building a raw transaction how is the base64 format of a signature incorporated into the transaction. It's not, there's no base64 representation of signatures used in Bitcoin consensus or transactions. Message signing using P2PKH with signmessage in Bitcoin Core and other tools uses a feature of ECDSA which was re-discovered after the creation of the ...


1

This is a limitation on the interface used for send many. The address,amount list is a dictionary internally within Bitcoin Core, and cannot have duplicate keys. As many other projects are forks of Bitcoin Core, the limitation applies to them as well. You can work around this by constructing a transaction manually or with a library that doesn't not use the ...


1

Sounds like you did not give bitcoind time to "sync", no other explanation comes to mind. Starting bitcoin-qt may be more obvious.


1

This is already done, somewhat implicitly. As a bitcoin node syncs, it constantly updates a utxo database. For each block, it removes all utxos consumed in that block, and adds all new ones created. As a result, once the node has synced, it has a full list of all unspent utxos. When a new transaction is processes, the node only needs to check this ...


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