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A transaction is confirmed when it is included in a block, so you will need to watch for a message that alerts your node (or whatever software you are using to watch the P2P gossip traffic) to a new block, that includes the transaction in question. It doesn't matter if a node run by a miner relays your transaction to other nodes on the network, it only ...


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Is this true? Yes, it is true. In very very simpler terms, think this to be in a way wherein someone sends you a coin worth that amount. In other words, if someone sends you 10 BTC, they are sending you a coin that is worth 10BTC, while when they send you 5 BTC, they send you a coin worth 5 BTC. So, while you are spending that money, you have to spend the ...


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It's not particularly required and may be considered redundant as that information is generally implied from the transaction outpoints referenced in the input. However, this form of transaction serialization allows wallet softwares to explicitly commit to the fees involved in the transaction. This is particularly useful if say you are using a hardware wallet ...


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This is a variation of a fairly well-known scam. You never owned any bitcoins, there was never any profit, it is all fake. A watch-only address looks like there is money there, and profits accumulating but it's just a window onto someone elses money, not yours. There are several similar stories on this website from other victims. How to unlock private key ...


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This is gossip protocol. When you are connected to the bitcoin network, you are usually connected to some random nodes. When you want to send transaction, ultimately your goal is for the transaction to appear in a block. The blocks are created by miners who operate few network nodes. Usually you don't even know which nodes belong to such miners. Therefore ...


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When a Bitcoin transaction is created, unspent transaction outputs (UTXOs) are used in the inputs of the transaction. Your wallet will use as many UTXOs (and therefore create as many inputs) as necessary to achieve the value you're trying to send in your transaction. UTXOs have to be spent completely, so most likely the total value achieved by the sum of ...


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You're putting the locktime in the wrong place. You have "[{\"txid\":\"myid\",\"vout\":0}]" "{\"address\":0.01, \"address\":0.01} 20" but it should really be "[{\"txid\":\"myid\",\"vout\":0}]" "{\"address\":0.01, \"address\":0.01}" 20 The locktime is a separate parameter, not part of the quoted parameter that has the transaction outputs. It goes outside ...


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This is a process known as consolidation - If your wallet has several small inputs, many wallets will often try to combine them into a single change input during regular transactions, especially ones made with a low sat/byte feerate. This allows you to spend the coins in a smaller transaction during possibly high traffic times, when the feerate may be much ...


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the coin is gone from the sending wallet yet never arrived in the receiving wallet This isn't really a thing - The transaction is confirmed, which means the coins did move. In fact, the 0.0215682 sent has already been spent (I am assuming that is the payment amount, as the other output goes to a p2pkh address, which seems likely for a change output), which ...


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The problem is the transaction fee doesn't depend on the values of inputs, but the number of inputs.


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A valid Bitcoin block has to include a minimum of one transaction, which is the coinbase transaction that pays out the block reward. Most of the early Bitcoin blocks did not include transactions that sent bitcoins from one party to other, but included only the coinbase transaction that paid out the newly minted bitcoins. In fact, the first transaction ...


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If the transaction outputs associated to the public key has not been spent, then finding the funds associated with that public key will mostly be a trial and error method. Searching in outputs Most outputs in Bitcoin send funds to an address that is the hash of the public key. Pay-to-public-key (P2PK) is the only standard output that sends funds directly ...


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In fact, the usual way to consult blockchains is using the public key (purportedly the public key of the searcher) as the result will be all the transactions in which the key is involved: https://www.blockchain.com/btc/address/1EwpnNBdFJykwxp6X8v9AfZnup9bgmrLE1 I suppose you're puzzled about the way to convert the public key to the public address, as the ...


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However, what is stopping someone, for example the recipient of the original transaction, to simply send in the same exact transaction with the same data and signature? Bitcoin does not have the concept of account balance but works on the concept of unspent transaction outputs (UTXOs). Each output of a transaction (except OP_RETURN ones) lead to the ...


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the coin is gone from the sending wallet yet never arrived in the receiving wallet. Although we often say (or write) that coins are stored in wallets, it is important to remember this is just a convenient shorthand analogy for communication between people. In reality, Bitcoins don't exist in wallets, they are not stored in wallets and are not moved in and ...


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Since you using wallets on the cell phone, I presume you are running a SPV node. SPV nodes verify transactions using a slightly different method that relies on peers to provide partial views of relevant parts of the blockchain on demand. In order to ensure that the transaction that you have sent has been confirmed in a block, your SPV nodes will use bloom ...


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They're the same thing. The scriptPubKey is the script in the transaction output.


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