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10

This is a question of definition. The blockchain doesn't store anything, it's an abstract data structure that's collectively maintained by nodes in a network. Those nodes are the ones that store things. That may or may not include the actual transaction data - it doesn't matter. The Bitcoin blockchain consists of hash-linked block headers. Every block header ...


4

The only right way of of doing this is generating a new address for every expected payment, and then waiting until you've received that amount on that address.


4

The transaction fee is implicitly specified. It is given to the miner as the remainder of the transaction: the difference between the sum of all transaction inputs and the sum of all transaction outputs is left free to be collected by the miner. See also: collecting block reward and transaction fees


3

The network does not need to agree on what the next block looks like, until it has been mined. Miners act independently to create new blocks, each miner can (and probably will) include slightly different transactions, in a slightly different order, in the block templates that they are mining on. In fact, a miner could fill a block up entirely with otherwise ...


2

I'm afraid you won't be able to access these funds. How do I access these BTC and get them onto the blockchain? I could be wrong but I believe that it's such an old unconfirmed transaction that it doesn't even show on the blockchain. The transaction is not, and has never been, confirmed on chain. From the perspective of the network, it doesn't exist. So ...


2

When you spend Bitcoin, you are not just using a new randomly generated keypair. You are using a specific keypair generated before. In order for you to have been sent Bitcoin, you have to give the sender a Bitcoin address. This Bitcoin address contains the hash of your public key. When you want to spend those Bitcoin, you put your public key into the ...


1

There were 119,783,647 Bitcoin transactions confirmed in 2019. Note that many Bitcoin transactions perform multiple payments at once. Methodology: Use the Blockchair block explorer to search for Bitcoin transactions between the dates 2019-01-01 and 2019-12-31 inclusive. Read number of results for the query at the bottom of the result page in the "load ...


1

The definition you found is wrong. There is no such thing as a "from" address, nor a "Bitcoin account". Think about the Bitcoin system as coins. As for physical coins, you spend them entirely and may get new coins back in change. Contrary to physical coins, these coins are public so anyone can "grab" them therefore there must be ...


1

There are different concerns about the needs transactions and blocks have. Transactions are created by wallets and other software, whenever they want to transact. We generally want a system that supports anyone creating transactions at any time, with as little coordination needed with other parties, and with as much volume/frequency as possible. Blocks on ...


1

No you don't need to open a channel with everyone whom you want to pay. The lightning network is a network of payment channels. This means that you can use the first channel to send money to other participants in the network as long as there are sufficiently liquid paths of channels from your node to the recipient.


1

This is not a question specifically about transaction fees; you could just as well ask "Why do we have to pay for oranges?" and it would be essentially the same question. At a price of zero, the quantity of confirmations (or oranges) demanded would exceed the quantity supplied. Now how do you decide which people get their transactions confirmed (...


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