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The Blockchain is the only truth At the time I wrote this, that transaction has 204 confirmations. That means it was absolutely definitely received. If the address is correct and the recipient says they didn't "receive" it, they are wrong. Either their wallet isn't properly synchronised or they are mistaken (or lying to you) Note that Bitcoin doesn't ...


4

The process of a transaction being created and included in the blockchain is as follows: The sender creates, signs, and broadcasts the transaction All Bitcoin full nodes, including miners and regular users, receive the transaction and validate it by making sure it follows the Bitcoin protocol rules Nodes temporarily store the unconfirmed/yet-to-be-mined ...


4

At a protocol level, they are all compatible. Transactions can spend any of them, and send to any of them. Wallet software may of course have restrictions, but these are usually not about combinations. E.g. some wallets may be unable to generate a p2sh-segwit address to receive on, or be unable to send to bech32. However, I have not heard about software ...


3

I think to have figured out that the public keys in P2PKH-transactions scripts begin with 76 all the time, is that enough to determine the type as P2PKH? No. The 0x76 is the number of the first opcode, OP_DUP. A full P2PKH transaction has the template OP_DUP OP_HASH160 0x14 <pkh> OP_EQUALVERIFY OP_CHECKSIG. Lastly, i wanted to ask, what other ...


2

The problem is that you are doing all of the hashing (and putting it into hex) and then having OpenSSL hash it again. openssl dgst will hash the message before signing, but this is incorrect for Bitcoin. Traditionally, in ECDSA, the message is hashed once and then signed. But with Bitcoin, it is actually hashed twice. Another way to think of this is that the ...


2

non spendable bitcoins That usually means either a watch-only address in a cryptocurrency wallet an account with a custodial service with some withdrawal restrictions. In either case, you are not the owner of those Bitcoins so far as the Bitcoin network is concerned. The watch-only address is a favourite trick of scammers/conmen. They like to set up ...


2

There are no restrictions on sending from any type of outputs to any address type in the Bitcoin protocol, but some older wallets might not support sending to newer address types. Let's take a better look at what happens for a Bitcoin transaction coming to pass: The recipient picks an address they would like to receive funds to. This will be an address ...


2

When a miner validates a block, does the block contain all transactions in Bitcoin for that time period? See this question for info about the structure of a block. A block can contain up to 4,000,000 weight units worth of transactions. So the miner can select transactions to include in the block, up to this limit. Generally, the miner will select the ...


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The sum of a transaction's inputs must be greater than or equal to the sum of outputs as part of the validation rules. This difference is the transaction fee. So to answer your question directly, when a UTXO is spent, it is referenced as part of a transaction input. A UTXO is always completely consumed (analogous to how if you spend a dollar bill, you ...


1

Depending on the nature of the implementation, yes. If you are considering hosted wallets such as exchanges, then yes - an MITM that is able to bypass SSL protections, a fairly common implementation on many corporate and organizational networks, will trivially be able to change data. Certain wallets work around this by either storing the private keys ...


1

Lastly, i wanted to ask, what other transaction types i could come across? I need to parse every transaction script to an address 100% correctly, thus i need to cover all possible cases. This is not possible, as not all transaction scripts correspond to an address. Addresses are a human convenience feature, and only cover the following formats: p2pkh p2sh ...


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