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You will need to buy bitcoin, then send that to your acquaintance. Other option is to convince your acquaintance to accept another payment method. Most bitcoin sellers will not accept credit card because it is very easy to lose money from chargebacks.


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It's a native segwit output. 0x00 signifies the segwit version (which is v0 in this case), 0x14 is the bytes to push and 2f82e61a98eb7027672760c691784d5fbccf7ce3 is the hash160 of the public key. Native segwit addresses uses bech32 encoding as defined in BIP 173 and begin with bc1. Use this for reference implementations in various programming languages. The ...


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Most of the output addresses follow one of the following 'standard outputs': Legacy Outputs P2PK: scriptPubKey: <public_key> OP_CHECKSIG. Output pays the public key directly and hence does not have a direct address. P2PKH: scriptPubKey: OP_DUP OP_HASH160 <hash160 of pubkey> OP_EQUALVERIFY OP_CHECKSIG. For this kind of output you just need to ...


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Use bitcoin-cli getrawtransaction "txID" 1 The output will include a "confirmations" field, telling you how many confirmations the transaction currently has. Note that to get this information for transactions not related to your wallet, you will need to set txindex=1 when syncing your your node, or provide bitcoin-cli with the blockhash of the block the ...


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Try this const bitcore = require("bitcore-lib"); const Insight = require("bitcore-explorers").Insight; insight = new Insight(bitcore.Networks.testnet); then do the rest.


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The first example that you have shown is a P2PKH address. The 0x14 indicates how many bytes to push onto the stack. 0x14 is 20 in decimal so the script pushes the next 20 bytes on the stack which is 6d 1d 74 58 95 6e 80 cd b4 c3 3f 1e d5 8e 91 c4 92 1a 85 d0. The second case is a Pay to Script Hash example (P2SH). The script is HASH160 Push 20 bytes <...


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This seems to be a classical P2PKH script which start with op_dup flowed by op_hash160 if you look at the next byte there is the hex value 14 which is 20 in decimal and means read 20 byte of data and push it to the stack. I have created a video in the past showing step by step how to dissect a P2PKH tx. Look: https://youtu.be/1n4g3eYX1UI


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The tx is located with the person who created it. Nodes will not hold onto the transaction because it is not ready for the mempool. The only places a node will hold someone else's transaction is in the mempool or in the blockchain so a node will not store a non-final transaction anywhere. It is up to the transaction creator to hold onto the transaction and ...


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I have been waiting a day for them to send me the wallet address they use so I can see if I sent it to the correct place. You don't need to wait. Open your wallet in Electrum and right-click on your outgoing transaction in the history tab. This will bring up a menu: left-click on Details. You will now see a new window named Transactions, which shows the ...


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I would approach this problem a little bit differently as counting in general is pretty difficult and the assumption of being an average node is pretty strong (not to say as I lay down below probably wrong) My approach however uses also a strong (and also probably wrong) assumption though I think it is not as strong / wrong as yours. In my video in which I ...


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If you were using a fork of Bitcoin Core, your small scale network would not work. Assuming you did the basic chain parameter modification or just firewall yourself from the rest of the Bitcoin network, there are two major things that are missing: peer discover, and mining. Bitcoin Core by default uses a process called DNS Seeding in order to discover seed ...


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They sent me a link which took me to a coinbase processor. I got the wallet address and sent the money from my Electrum Wallet. I have 157 confirmations, Electrum shows it's there and complete, but the receiver says they never got it. One of three things has happened: The receiver's wallet is not properly synced wit the network and hasn't seen your ...


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Private Key (SK) -> Public Key (PK) -> Address (A). Some say that SK -> PK == A. Which one is correct? The first one. An address is not a public key. It is some encoding (Base 58 Check encoding or Bech32, depending on the address type) of the RIPEMD160 hash of the SHA256 hash of the public key. The address comes from the public key, but it is not the public ...


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Nodes when verifying a transaction do something very similar, don’t they? That is true, but there is one difference. When full nodes initialize, they go through each and every transaction in the blockchain since the genesis block. As they go through the transaction, they build up a set of all unspent transaction outputs (UTXOs). When a new transaction ...


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Blockchain.com show charts of "The total USD value of trading volume on major bitcoin exchanges." Doubtless there are other publishers of equivalent data.


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That address is a bech32 encoded address, which is a new style of address used on the Bitcoin network, that starts with bc1.... It seems that the Blockchain.info explorer has simply not been updated to properly interpret and present this newer address type. The addresses you listed are perfectly valid.


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Using Bitcoin Core, if you start it with -debug=net (or add debug=net to your bitcoin.conf file), every single network message will be included in the debug.log file along with the node it came from. You can then parse the debug.log file to get the information you want.


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In Bitcoin, any transaction that confines to the consensus protocol is valid. This is unlike other ledger based system like Ripple, where the validators vote on whether the transaction is valid and if it should be included in the ledger. In those ledger systems, the validators gets reward for helping maintain the ledger. When your Bitcoin full node receives ...


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I believed this section of the documentation is what you are looking for https://bitcoinj.github.io/working-with-the-wallet#using-fees You can edit the fees via SendRequest.fee or SendRequest.feePerKb API


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I would parse the blockchain. There are libraries for almost any programming language. You can in a 5-liner scan through all transactions and see which input they spent. You need to do this with a local parser and not via an remote api as remote api calls would take way too much time. If the input txid is an element of your funding txset wich you collected ...


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Bitcoin-core already enforces low S-values as a standardness rule for transaction relay, but making a transaction non-standard does not cause a softfork. BIP-146 does call for a softfork by making high S-values in tx signatures invalid, not just nonstandard. The BIP also states that the majority of txs on the network already adhere to the low S rule, as ...


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My search on this website did not reveal a single answer that comprehensively explores nSequence and how it has evolved since inception. They either address a particular query or are dated like this. If you can find a better/older answer, mark this question as duplicate. Original meaning of nSequence in transactions nSequence is a 4 byte input level ...


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You can use an airgapped machine to derive the address and import it as a watch-only address to another instance. You could also use an airgapped machine or hardware wallet to sign a raw transaction offline.


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In increasing order of scepticism: most charitably, maybe they sent you a nice exe that unzips to make a bitcoin client, and includes a bitcoin keyring('wallet') with some keys giving you access to bitcoin on the chain. I wouldn't even know how to do this, but it seems possible. I doubt your 'someone' has the necessary skills. less charitably, they just saw ...


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This sounds like a scam, or at least, an attempt to compromise your computer with malware. Sending someone a Bitcoin transaction does NOT involve sending someone an executable file. It involves using the bitcoin network to send a bitcoin transaction that moves some amount of bitcoin to addresses owned by the transaction's participants. You can generate ...


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Can I still receive my coin For privacy, many wallets use a new receiving address for each transaction but sending money to an old address should still work. You can use one or more of the public blockchain explorers to find out the status of transactions involving the old address. Addresses To view a full list of addresses known to your wallet see I can&...


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At the moment no more than 17662867.32455670 BTC exist. A transaction can't be smaller than 63 bytes so the "maximum feerate" would be 28036297340566.19 satoshi per byte and increasing with each block.


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How can I determine (if it is possible) what amount sender A sent to receiver B , instead having the balance for each participant ? You pretty much can't. Often times, transactions like these are created for the purpose of making it difficult to determine which inputs are sending money to which outputs. Such transactions are called CoinJoins, so named ...


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It should be viewed as a single transaction and not who sent bitcoins to whom. On the left hand side you have the inputs to the transaction, and on the right hand side you have the outputs. In Bitcoin, you do not have the concept of account balance. Each output of a transaction is locked with a script and anyone who provides solution to that script can spend ...


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the left list are not the senders, these are transactions inputs and not the sender, to the right those are the outputs (receivers addresses). Please read more about Bitcoin transactions if you're interested https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Transaction


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Bitcoin Core has a hard limit for what it considers to be an absurdly high fee. That limit is 0.1 BTC Any transaction that pays more than 0.1 BTC in transaction fees, regardless of the fee rate, will be rejected with this error 256: absurdly-high-fee . It is not consensus invalid, it is just non-standard.


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When Bob sells coffee, Alice first constructs a transaction spending one of her available inputs to an address owned by Bob. The resulting transaction gets put into a block and is given a txidto identify it. The txid is the double-SHA256 of the serialized transaction. Within the transaction, there may be multiple outputs - one of these will be the output ...


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Let us illustrate this using the example given in Mastering Bitcoin. Joe sent 0.1 BTC to Alice in the transaction having txid = 7957a35fe64f80d234d76d83a2a8f1a0d8149a41d81de548f0a65a8a999f6f18. Below are the outputs of that transaction: vout": [ { "value": 0.10000000, "n": 0, "scriptPubKey": { "asm": "OP_DUP ...


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Miners can choose whatever transactions they wish to include in a block, as long as they are valid, but doing so may require them using custom software. As far as I'm aware, the Bitcoin Core software selects transactions by highest paying fee first. No. The hash rate is determined by specialized hardware (ASICs) which do not perform transaction validation. ...


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