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0

If an address appears in the vout list, it is incoming for that address. If the address is in the vin list, it is an outgoing transaction for that address. Addresses may appear in both the vin and the vout.


3

Then the blochain of the "hacker" will have 1 block more than the others, thus it should be, at least for a few minutes, the "valid" blockchain This is incorrect. A block that contains an invalid transaction is invalid, period. The network's rule is that the longest(*) valid chain is the one to be treated as correct. A chain with any invalid blocks in it ...


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When miners build valid blocks with transactions, they put in significant amount of compute work to generate a hash of the block header that meets the difficulty requirement. Blockchain is a chain of blocks where each block header references the hash of the header of the previous block. The hash of the block header is calculated using all the elements of the ...


1

he is inputting any arbitrary values, in order to get a value that can be hashed into something with certain preceding zeros. When he got that value, he put that value into the blockchain and generate a new block. It happens in reverse. First the miner builds the new block itself. Then builds its header, then hashes that header. Also what the miner looks ...


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and other input(s) should have "00" in place. Keep in mind that you replace the "scriptsig" with "empty" and the 0x00 is the size of the empty script. non-mandatory-script-verify-flag (Non-canonical DER signature) (code 64) The problem here is the DER encoding used in your signatures. r values in a signature are positive and since each r value that you ...


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I have gotten this error not only when specifying an incorrect input amount, as mentioned elsewhere in this thread, but also when sorting signatures incorrectly on a multisig transaction.


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First, a quick overview of what happens when you submit a transaction to the network: Each node that hears about your transaction will check to see if it is valid according to their view of the network. If it is valid, the node may broadcast the transaction to its peers, and may add the transaction to its local mempool. If it is invalid, the transaction ...


2

If a node X receives first the blockchain from A, and it approves it, when it receives the blockchain from B, it simply reject it ? It will keep the block locally as an alternate chain, but not immediately discard it. If a node X receives first then blockchain from A, and then the B's blockchain in which also a node C has put another correct block (so is ...


2

Probably no. Bitcoin transactions work by consuming transaction outputs and creating new transaction outputs. Your wallet will look at what outputs it has available to spend (i.e. your received coins) and choose enough outputs to cover the amount that you want to send plus the transaction fee. If you have sent Bitcoin before, then not all of the outputs ...


1

Tell receiver to send tx id, check on block explorer, if confirmed, then there are two reasons ; It is either you sent to another public address or The receiver is not honest.


3

Is recipient lying they have not received or could something else be the issue such as his wallet? Seems likely in this case. Recipient says it could be because his 'hard' wallet is set up in a way so it activates/acknowledges/receives with $1000 transaction minimum? This is not a thing, you're almost certainly being scammed. Wallets don't require ...


15

Someone wrote a Bitcoin protocol decoder for Wireshark, several years ago. I assume it was included in the Wireshark distribution. Wireshark simply knows about the Bitcoin protocol. There is no magic involved.


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i manage to find answer for myself. OP_CSV date consensus is based on median time past (mtp), not block's confirmed date. once funding tx above has been confirmed, it is located in block#1609592 with block MTP is 2019-11-24 09:05:26 (UTC 0). At same time, chain's MTP is 2019-11-24 09:25:27 (UTC 0) now come to spending tx, since utxo's confirmed date i ...


1

This is additional information displayed by blockchain.com, and not part of the transaction data (for the transaction being viewed). The PkScript is the locking script set by the previous transactions that created the outputs being used as inputs for the selected transaction. The selected transaction does not include this information, only a reference to it ...


0

Here is the transaction you sent, displayed by a block explorer: It can be seen that the transaction created two outputs: 1AHpgNCRHg41wmX4SWvsA8eq7wcN6gPKMi 0.59573100 BTC 1LSpWLjsQS3Z5j49gFXNy8YYHz8sMjUMr4 0.00046671 BTC I assume that the 1AHpg.. address is what you paid your friend, and the other address is your change. But in any case, neither of the ...


0

You need to check your transaction on an explorer like blockstream.info. There, you will see what was the inputs and outputs of your transaction. The most likely case (assuming you sent to the correct address) is that you sent an incorrect amount. Even in that case the change will come back to you. Another possibility is that you sent the transaction ...


1

so, I checked my router whether the port number(48302, 44660) is opened or not but, no any port is currently open. They don't appear open because those ports are not always open listening for incoming connections. Rather those ports are bound to temporarily by the forwarding software which then initiates the connection to your computer. As soon as the ...


2

The comment field seen on the blockchain.info blockexplorer is a feature of the blockchain.com wallet. The data for that comment field is created by users of their wallet, stored only by blockchain.com/info and published by blockchain.info. This comment is not part of the Bitcoin transactions stored on the Bitcoin blockchain, it's only stored in the ...


2

Is there any software or organization that can verify whether wallet is secure or not? You can use an open source wallet and take the time to read and understand all the code and then compile it yourself. This would be an unfeasably large task for most ordinary people. Software developers might find it a bit easier but it is still a large amount of work. ...


1

We don't know for sure, but I doubt it. It's generally believed that the stakeholders of bitcoin (those who pay the miners) consider censorship resistant extremely important, perhaps the main reason for bitcoin to exist. If this is true, they won't pay for mining if it stops producing the censorship resistance the stakeholders want. Stakeholders could ...


4

it means that proportion of fresh node should be bigger than proportion of legacy node. The requirement for segwit's activation was that the majority of the hashrate signaled readiness for activation. Although this process was frequently misconstrued as a "vote of miners", the activation proposal actually requests that miners judge whether the majority of ...


6

In this point, if Bob make a fraud transaction with Segwit, legacy node will accept, but it is not accepted in terms of fresh node. so, some group(legacy nodes) accept, other some groups(fresh nodes) doesn't accept. it means that proportion of fresh node should be bigger than proportion of legacy node. I think that this is really critical issue but ...


1

How legacy node can verify them without the witness? An example of a SegWit output is: scriptPubKey: 0 ab68025513c3dbd2f7b92a94e0581f5d50f654e7. For legacy nodes, this output looks like an anyone can spend output as there are no opcodes or verification. Such outputs do not require any signatures to spend. Thus when a legacy node sees a transaction spending ...


1

What you are describing is essentially a majority attack. A miner (or group of colluding miners) with a majority of hashpower can censor arbitrary transactions, and blocks that include them. This question has more info about what an attacker can do. Crucially: a majority of hashpower can create blocks at a faster rate (on average) than the minority. So if ...


1

Assuming you double checked that you sent the coins to the right BTC adddress: The wallet of the receiver should be connected to a full Bitcoin-node, either his own node or another node. This node could be down or not updated to current block height. So you might ask the receiver if (s)he used the same wallet already successfully for other transactions ...


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Yes, miners can censor transactions. A mining pool (or solo miner) can choose to not add a transaction to any blocks that they create. And, of course, this can be done dynamically so that transactions that match whatever arbitrary rules they want can be disallowed. However this only effects one mining pool or miner. Other miners will not necessarily follow ...


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correction Nov 15: There is in each block a coinbase transaction and it"s always the first transaction. The mined coins show up and the balance can be seen in the explorers (miners reward plus fees). Not necessarily it's in the first transaction of a block and not necessarily a block needs to contain a miners reward, but in most cases it is there and it's ...


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