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2

There really isn't any "starting over" in mining, because mining is effectively progress free, like a lottery and unlike a race. Nothing is lost when updating the transaction list, other then the negligible amount of processing needed to make the new list and bandwidth to communicate it. The miner will include the additional transactions whenever it gets ...


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Since the time between those blocks is so small (from 593576 to 593577 was only 16 seconds) a miner wouldn't have many transactions to add to the block they are mining (there just haven't been many transactions on the network within that period of time). Also, mining is random, if you happened to mine a block, wouldn't you want to get the block reward even ...


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They may dislike compute to find transaction if they have to sequence search because they are busy to find hash value of block to earn block reward You are confusing mining with node operation. It is a full node on the network that will return info about the relevant merkle path to the SPV wallet. Mining is done separately, by specialized hardware that ...


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When a transaction is created by your node and relayed to full nodes, they will check to ensure that the transaction is valid (no double spending is one condition amongst them). Full node maintains a set of UTXO list in the chainstate folder and is aggressively cached in memory. If a transaction is valid, the full nodes will remove the UTXOs that are ...


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This was just a problem of the terminal I used on a mac. Adding | python -m json.tool to the command does the trick, as described here. Output now is: bitcoin@raspberrypi ~ $ curl https://blockchain.info/unspent?active=1Cdid9KFAaatwczBwBttQcwXYCpvK8h7FK | python -m json.tool % Total % Received % Xferd Average Speed Time Time Time ...


2

Transaction signing process involves signing the hash of the entire transaction data as a message in the ECDSA signature. So, if you modify the transaction outputs or any other data then it will render the signature invalid. If you include this transaction in the block, mine it and then relay that block, the other full nodes will see that a transaction ...


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The starting bytes 4c 50 has nothing to do with ASCII encoding. 0x4c represents opcode OP_PUSHDATA1 which indicates that the next opcode bytes is data to be pushed onto the stack. So in the examples that you have given, 4c 50 will indicate pushing the next 0x50 bytes onto the stack which is 80 bytes in decimal. The question you should have been asking is why ...


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The most secure way is running your own full nodes per Blockchain. Using third-party services such as blockcypher will put you & your business at high risk because of: You're giving the keys to your home & revealing the password of your bank account to someone else! Because in order to use such services, they are the one who make the public & ...


3

The blockchain is the mechanism for Bitcoin to converge on one shared state. Participants submit payment orders in the form of unconfirmed transactions to the network from which miners then select a set of transactions into their block candidates. The Merkle root hereby represents a commitment to one specific list of previously unconfirmed, valid ...


1

For every new block there is a new Merkle tree of transactions. Once the block is included in the blockchain the Merkle tree (and hence the Merkle root) for that block is not changed. In your example, if you are a miner trying to mine a block you can choose to continue with transactions A, B, C and D or form a new Merkle tree with A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H. ...


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Merkle root is block specific, so each block has a different merkle root. If transactions A-H belong to the same block, then you will have to calculate the merkle root using all the transactions from A-H, if not you will have merkle root containing transaction A-D in Block N and merkle root containing transactions E-H in block N+1. Blocks commit to the ...


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If I undestend the your question, you referer to the lockTime inside the transaction and not the block timestamp. The lockTime is a int value, and this value rappresent "When the transaction can be unlockd to an inputs" and not "When the transaction was published" Lock time: Defines the first instant in which the transaction is considered valid and can be ...


2

The transaction that you submitted and the transaction that was malleated in-flight or by a miner are both legitimate (valid) transactions. Transaction malleability means that a valid transaction can be modified in-flight, without invalidating it and without access to the relevant private keys. Even if changing the components of the transaction doesn't make ...


2

where is my bitcoin money, when downloading is failed. Your money is in the Blockchain (loosely speaking). It is not affected by the state of your wallet. When your wallet finishes collecting its own copy of the public Blockchain (synchronisation), it will be able to show you the amount of money you control. Some explanation: A wallet does two things. ...


3

Another possibility is to use the getblockstats command to get the number of transactions (not including the coinbase transaction) for a specific block (by height/hash). E.g. $ getblockstats 500000 '["txs"]' { "txs": 2701 } Then, iterate through all of the blocks to get the total for all blocks.


3

I'm reasonably sure this is not exposed by the RPC API. You could parse debug.log and look for lines like: 2019-08-20T12:17:58Z UpdateTip: new best=0000000000000000000e6c402b311740e21f79a42ed84ecf69a3ae4fe88ce882 height=590956 version=0x20000000 log2_work=90.9855 tx=446914655 date='2019-08-20T12:17:55Z' progress=1.000000 cache=277.1MiB(321228txo) Where tx=...


3

It's a best effort guess made by blockchain.com, has little relevance, is not particularly accurate, and should not be used for any meaningful analysis. It has no impact on the transaction, and is not part of the Bitcoin protocol. It is somewhat accurate for very simple transactions, but breaks down for larger ones, and ones that utilize more recent anti-...


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According to Blockstream block explorer, it looks like you have 1 confirmed output. So most likely it's an issue relating to the wallet you're using. Unfamiliar with the Jubiter wallet but do you know whether it connect to Jubiter's nodes through a web/app, or do you have to connect it to a full node running on your machine? My guess is the former. I'd ...


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