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14

You actually can't update all the firmware. In particular, the portion of the firmware that implements the security logic cannot be modified, it's burned in for good. If you want to take full control over a Trezor, which would even let you load malware onto it, you can. However, the internal security logic would still wipe all the data in the unit when you ...


13

If you update the firmware you are probably safe, but why take the chance? The Trezor itself (or even the included USB cable https://www.wired.com/2014/07/usb-security/) could have been corrupted/replaced by a sophisticated actor. If someone gave me a used Trezor for free, I would throw it in the garbage. No discount would be sufficient enough for me to ...


8

GPG Keys "TREZOR can now securely generate GPG keys for signing of emails or documents (using the NIST256P1 and Ed25519 curves). Currently, this update does not allow for GPG decryption, a feature planned for next firmware update. For more information check out the great TREZOR Agent by Roman Zeyde." https://medium.com/@satoshilabs/trezor-firmware-1-3-6-...


6

Trezor implements BIP32/BIP39 (hierarchical deterministic wallet and mnemonic encoded seeds, respectively). The mnemonic (12 words) is just a way of encoding a hex seed like 6c5f9d00018f2a2030afcc6f3057e5a4dea6dfb905dd4b0197a9a047bcfe0501662332a3caa846b1223ff3d20cfb295e7f94fe51c94472e3f8429c97754132e9 (whose mnemonic would be business weird season glimpse ...


6

I emailed them about this: As for the possibility to get the seed out of the TREZOR: Official firmware doesn't have any support for exporting the seed Official firmware is opensource at github and signed by SatoshiLabs so anybody can check that the firmware can't leak the keys. The signature is checked by the device's bootloader which can't be ...


6

If I remember correctly, the Trezor uses deterministic wallets, as specified in BIP 0032. That means that the device will give you a sentence that the wallet can be regenerated from, in case it's lost.


5

(trezor-agent developer here...) Please take a look at the latest trezor-agent version here. I'd be happy to fix any issue with the documentation, and extend it with more examples to make it more helpful for first-time users :) EDIT: Make sure to install all the required packages as described here: https://github.com/romanz/trezor-agent/blob/master/INSTALL....


5

I don't think you can as the Trezor (and every other hardware wallet) does not expose your private keys to the computer it is connected to. This is how you can still securely spend your Bitcoin even with a computer that has malware on it. However, the Trezor 24 word seed uses BIP 39 and BIP 32 so you can use that to derive your private keys on another ...


4

BIP 32/39 allows key portability across different wallet implementations. To complement the "Wizard of Ozzie" answer above, a different method (C++ based, not JavaScript based code) is provided below to reconstruct the results above using the bitcoin-explorer (bx) command line interface that should be executed offline with "real" mnemonics and keys. ...


4

Trezor is a relatively simple, specialized hardware device. It does not run any OS, just a small program specifically developed for signing Bitcoin transactions and managing the keys. Thus, the attack surface is very small compared to conventional general-purpose computers. You can say it's practically impossible to infect it. Security is a much more ...


4

The Trezor wallet is a Hierarchical Deterministic wallet. This means that the entire wallet is derived from the seed. The seed is encoded as the 24 word mnemonic which is what you have to backup. To restore the wallet, you enter the mnemonic which is converted to the seed. The private keys are then derived from the seed, and since it is the same seed and ...


4

The Trezor generates a seed offline on your device. Neither the private key nor this seed are ever shared with SatoshiLabs. In fact, you're in sole control of your private key: when you first set up your Trezor, you're being shown the 24 words that encode your seed. You have to write these words down and keep them as a backup. When you lose your Trezor, you ...


3

Yes. Trezor uses BIP39 and is compatible with any other wallet that would. You can in fact import your seed into electrum, though this to some extent defeats the purpose of having a hardware wallet.


3

Generate an address on the hardware wallet. Then log in to your web wallet account and send all your coins to that address. That's all.


3

As explained in their FAQ, Trezor works together with existing wallet software, it's not a standalone wallet. What happens is that the wallet you use gets the addresses from your wallet from Trezor and can display your balance with that information. When you want to spend money, it will create a transaction as it would normally do, but instead of signing ...


3

You simply can't add, insert or install software or any executable stuff into a Trezor. Due to the way the Trezor is set up, it runs fully autonomically. The only thing that goes into the Trezor is transaction details (addresses, amounts, etc). There's just no opportunity whatsoever to put any malware in there, because whatever you send to the Trezor, it's ...


3

Yes. When you initialize your Trezor, it generates a private and a public key. Private key never leaves the device (that's the core value proposition). That means you can't sign transactions (spend coins) without Trezor plugged in. However, the web wallet can remember your addresses (derived from the public key). Even without the Trezor plugged in, you can ...


3

Bitcore fork from SatoshiLabs is indeed available only for 64-bit linux. You can try to build the necessary binaries yourself and then update the npm install scripts in bitcore, but that is very hard. I would not recommend you to run bitcore on a personal computer, since it adds additional 200GB data, so you will end up with about half a terabyte of data. ...


3

For Trezor specifically, just check their website for details. Essentially, you need to have: a new or wiped Trezor wallet. your Trezor recovery card, filled out correctly. a computer with the Trezor bridge software installed. You plug the new Trezor into the computer, open the Bridge software, and and follow the "Trezor Recovery" instructions. It will ...


3

Most (but not all) wallets will follow what is specified in BIPs 32, 44, and 49. BIP 32 defines what derivation paths are and what they mean. It is the standard for deriving all of the keys in a HD wallet. BIPs 44 and 49 specify derivation paths that wallets should use. BIP 44 defines a standard derivation path format: m / purpose' / coin_type' / account' /...


3

Wouldn't it be saver to generate a mnemonic passphrase manually by just taking random words from a lookup table? No, it would not be. This method may even be insecure if you are actually doing it manually. A BIP 39 mnemonic, if generated properly, is secure. It is just as secure if you randomly choose words too. This is because both methods require a ...


2

Yes, Trezor uses the BIP0032 standard to derive your keys from the seed. That means you can use any BIP0032-compatible client for recovery, or you can even use them simultaneously (but be aware of the security implications - you don't want it to leak, otherwise it beats the whole Trezor purpose). For example, Electrum works great with HD wallets, but I'm ...


2

You can check on 3rd-party pages whether they have knowledge of your transaction: E.g. Blockexplorer shows that address 1HyETxKBZshfu2cdjEWMYntDFabFXsrHe2 received just short of 35 BTC last week. If that's the amount you sent, you were successful.


2

Generating, and thus exposing, the private key using the seed words would be very foolish. It would be the same as not using a TREZOR at all. You NEVER want the private keys be other than safely within your TREZOR. The generated seed words should never be entered on a (connected) computer or device, just keep them safe off line. There are a number of wallets ...


2

Is there a mobile wallet that support using a Trezor hardware wallet to spend coins? You first need an OTG cable and a phone that supports acting as a USB host. Trezor has not released a mobile version of their wallet. However they have a Wallet Manager that can be used on your mobile (for Android). This allows you to manage the Trezor (but not spend ...


2

As you can see from an answer given by a Trezor's staff member in this reddit post on 5th October 2017: We will do an official communication once it is clear what Segwit2x is and what is not. Currently, there are some changes in the Segwit2x queue which might or might not be accepted and this can change significantly what steps would need to be done. ...


2

Try the other servers. This means Trezor's blockchain explorers (for example, this one: https://btc-bitcore3.trezor.io) are under maintenance, or restarting, or can't be connected (DNS/ISP problems)... If your Trezor can't connect to Trezor's servers, then it won't be able to make transaction (as it'll be unable to find older transactions, unspent outputs)....


2

BCH (Bcash) as Trezor refer to it, is now available on https://beta-wallet.trezor.io after applying 1.5.1 firmware upgrade. Go to https://beta-wallet.trezor.io You can also use tool to claim your BCC, read more on this blog page


2

Following the steps from "How to claim your Bitcoin Cash (Bcash)" by Trezor Blog should do the trick. https://blog.trezor.io/claim-bcash-bitcoin-cash-bch-bcc-trezor-wallet-f0a810d5864a Steps: 1) Make sure Trezor uses latest firmware 2) Connect your Trezor 3) Go to Coin splitting tool


2

You should have your Trezor recovery card with 24 words you have written down. With these 24 words (the recovery seed) you can access your coins without a Trezor. Here is an explanation. If this doesn't help you might want to contact Trezor support.


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