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2

Yes, you can sign with that. Hardware wallets don't care about your gap limit, they aren't deriving individual keys when you setup the wallet. Rather they just store the master private key (or the seed used to derive the master private key) and then derive the individual keys needed on-the-fly. So if you tell it to sign with the 999,999th key, by giving it ...


2

You can use them, but you need to ensure that the hardware wallets use the same address derivation paths. For the hardware wallets you mentioned (Trezor and Ledger) both of them use the BIP 39/BIP 44 derivation paths, so that should work, especially in the case of Bitcoin. However care has to be taken for certain coins (ETH or any other ERC-20 for example) ...


0

You cannot import individual private keys into a Trezor. However you can generate your own mnemonic offline and import that into a Trezor.


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Trezor follows (and helped design) BIP44. BIP44 details how a single mnemonic may be used to create individual keychains for different blockchains, and how multiple accounts may work within those keychains. This is not a foolproof system - if you deviate from the expectations of BIP 44 (such as using addresses beyond the 20 address gap limit) automated ...


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