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4

Correct. A single miner can slow down a transaction simply by not including it in their blocks. Of course, unless they possess enough hashrate compared to everyone else, the effect will not really be noticeable. Completely blocking a transaction would become possible with 51% or more of the network hashrate, as any chain including a "forbidden" ...


9

Of course, if there was even one node which didn't want to restrict the addresses activity, the transactions would eventually get through, but these neutral nodes might notice that that address has a harder time making transactions, so those neutral nodes might realize that they can demand a higher price for transactions from that address. I think you ...


9

The solution to this problem is: anyone can become a miner, in theory. Proof of work replaces a central party that can censor with a consensus protocol, where miners jointly decide what transactions get processed, and in what order. But that's just part of the picture - if we fully trusted miners (or a majority of them) to never behave maliciously, we could ...


1

To add to James' answer, the "segregated" witness can be switched out for an alternative valid witness which changes the wtxid but not the txid. The txid stays the same if you change the witness as the witness is not hashed for the txid but is for wtxid. Thanks to Gloria Zhao for providing this graphic during a Bitcoin Core PR review club in June ...


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