12

From a cryptographic point of view, there is just one type of private keys and one type of public keys. A private key is an integer in the range 1 to 115792089210356248762697446949407573529996955224135760342422259061068512044368, a public key is a point on the elliptic curve secp256k1. No magic here. The problem is that Bitcoin uses addresses, and addresses ...


10

The probabilities are detailed here: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Vanitygen#Difficulty_of_finding_a_vanity "The difficult of finding a vanity address depends on its exact structure (leading letters and numbers) and how likely such an output is given the algorithms involved, which can consist of several pivots where the difficulty suddenly changes." ...


8

There's this thread on bitcoin talk: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=90982.0 I personally generated this address: 1BoyishnessfwHq3wSkCkJ7iafUdjhghfU which is the longest one I'm aware of that's not mixed case. It was generated by feeding oclvanitygen a large number of potential prefixes from a large wordlist.


7

I ran vanitygen -k 1, which will keep creating addresses matching the pattern 1* until stopped, for approximately five seconds and it generated more than 3,000 addresses. No GPU assistance here. So, do this: In one Terminal tab, run vanitygen or oclvanitygen: vanitygen -k -o addrs 1 In another Terminal tab, run this: watch 'echo "`wc -l addrs | egrep -o ...


6

The 160-bit hash that is encoded in addresses is uniformly distributed ("truely random" as you call it), but the base58 encoded form is not. Some characters are more likely to occur at the start, for example. To illustrate, consided the set of all integers between 0 and 1999. Even though each of those numbers is equally likely to be chosen, this is not true ...


6

It is the same thing as a vanity plate which are used for cars. That is: An address which you choose yourself (or at least part of it). For example the address of Bitcoin24 is 1BTC24yVKQdQNAa4vX71xLUC5A8Za7Rr71 (watch the first six characters!). See this question How can I generate a vanity Bitcoin address?


6

You can do this manually using the hex/base58check converter (such as the converter on brainwallet.org) Remove the starting 1 and convert from base58 XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX to hex: 25c7415deb828c49ccb799c452ae17589bca1af2 (make sure result is 24 bytes) Remove last 4 bytes to get a 20-byte hash: 25c7415deb828c49ccb799c452ae17589bca1af2 -> ...


6

I'd assume it's just so people reading the docs won't try to "tip" the writer and send to a foobar address that was made up for the sake of example That is correct! Other than that, there is no other real point at all. These bitcoins are gone forever and no one will ever be able to get them. However there is some projects or new coins that does Proof-Of-...


5

If you mean as part of a URL or domain name, then yes, I think it's a bad idea. If your private key is somehow compromised (eg through a stolen or hacked PC) you may no longer want to use that address, but your users may have it in their bookmarks for years afterwards. However, as long as it didn't have any particular meaning (such as being accompanied by ...


5

Samr's vanitygen gets its initial private key from OpenSSL's random functions, which have been well vetted. Even if you specify a random seed (which is a good idea to add even more randomness) the entropy generation random libraries from the crypto is still used. It has equal randomness and strength as Bitcoin's address/key generator, with the exception that ...


5

Difficulty tells you how likely it is that vanitygen will be able to find the address pattern you're looking for on the next guess. A value of 2n is twice as difficult (half as likely) than a value of n. Because the process is completely random, it's impossible to give you a '100%' ETA. We can only estimate that, on average, you will find your key before ...


4

just in case anyone still looking for an answer: in pattern.c just put the full path to pcre.h (use locate pcre.h to find a path for it; if you don't have the file just install pcre package first). It should compile fine afterwards.


4

To generate an Elliptic Curve private key in PEM format using the secp256k1 curve (which is the one used in Bitcoin): openssl ecparam -genkey -name secp256k1 -out tmp/data.pem To convert the private key from PEM (human-readable and extended) to a hex format: openssl ec -in tmp/data.pem -outform DER|tail -c +8|head -c 32|xxd -p -c 32 To retrieve the ...


4

Zero. They are completely unrelated. And if you think about that, it is quite obvious... otherwise it would be very easy to steal known addresses: you would just have to find a similar one.


4

Vanitygen has a regex option, for generating addresses that match an arbitrary regular expression. I think that vanitygen -r '^1Bit.*Bit$' would work. Note that it will not be able to estimate the expected time that would be required.


4

It is better to explain by example: We need to find a vanity address with the prefix "1Love". The minimum address with this prefix is "1Love1111...1111+ControlSum" and this corresponds to the number Xmin. The maximum address with this prefix is "1Lovezzzz...zzzz+ControlSum" and this corresponds to the number Xmax. ("1" and "z" are the first and last ...


4

So things turned out to be a little bit different. But now i have a solution, that seems to be workable and adequate. Original task was to calculate difficult of finding specific vanity address (like vanitygen does). Difficult is basically number_of_all_possible_addresses / number_of_addresses_with_vanity_prefix rate. So, for example if we have only dec ...


4

To simply generate a new main network address, you can use the official zcash-cli like that: $ zcash-cli getnewaddress t1fMAAnYrpwt1HQ8ZqxeFqVSSi6PQjwTLUm Or: $ zcash-cli z_getnewaddress zcHTYUQRA54WGdcNtLRx1yRyvEJjLD8NAK4S7FbEGoqB1s5En4syEStMnJPRMAD8XmF9xgeKnCEuZ7g35LcNpMhRDZX4PDw Vanity is a bit tricky, but there is an offline wallet generator ...


4

The point is that someone obviously made up the sentence and then adapted the last few places to make it adhere to the checksum test, i.e. it is a valid Bitcoin address. On the other hand, it's certain that it's not an address someone generated randomly (because vanity addresses of that length would take way too much effort to generate). Thus, it's a "safe ...


3

Finding a vanity address is a random process. Even if we find an address with N letters we are interested in, it does not change anything about finding an address of N+1 letters. Finding an additional letter in a vanity address pattern requires on average performing 58 times as many calculations as it took to find the original length.


3

If you just need the keys, but not imported into bitciond: Generate 100M random numbers, each 256-bits long - these are your private keys.* For each of the numbers execute the curve's ScalarBaseMult - to get X and Y. The X (and Y) is your public key - you just need to hash and b58 encode it, to turn it into a bitcoin address. *) You might want to check if ...


3

Simple website to create burn address http://gobittest.appspot.com/ProofOfBurn If you want a script try this https://gist.github.com/CoinWhisperer/6d673f1f3d13da1611cd


3

The key point here is that vanitygen is not deterministic - It relies on entropy provided by the system it is running on, which is why running it multiple times with the same pattern will produce different addresses. As long as the entropy provided by the system used to generate the address is sufficiently random, keys produced by vanity gen are as good as ...


2

Here's what vanity address I generated: 1DETACHABLEDD7hgExqScWngMrxDGtXwcX This is the real word. All characters in the pattern are uppercase. The length of the pattern is 11 characters.


2

If two or more people choose the same, non-random seed while looking for vanity address with the same pattern, they will end up with the same private key. This would happen due to them either iterating to the same private key from the seed, or by ending up with the same private key by using the given language's version of rand() function with identical seeds....


2

You can choose the private key to be whatever you want, and calculate the corresponding public key and bitcoin address. Adding to this answer, there is really no reason to want to do this. But if one really insisted, here is a way to do it with hal. First start with generating a random private key $ hal key generate { "raw_private_key": "...


2

Overall, you have to start with a "1" (unless you're doing alt-coins). Then the first letter is the only one that can be more tricky to generate (some letters from the end of the Base58 alphabet are harder). Also, generating an address with a lot of leading 1s is a lot harder than any other characters due to how addresses are constructed (leading 1s mean ...


2

Yes, you can send coins to this new address. If you restart your client you'll see the address will have moved to your receive list of addresses. The new address initially posts in your address book because of the need to scan the blockchain for all transactions associated with that private key. But you have to actually restart your client to move the ...


2

Reusing an address is a security issue if you have a weak random number generator, as was an issue with the Android Bitcoin Wallet. I should note this was android's fault for using a bad generator and was fixed quickly by the app developer, though some people lost coins because they had signed multiple messages (i.e. transactions) with the same address and ...


2

I Think there is some confusion here regarding the generating of new address's within a wallet and the generation of Vanity Address's. Based on Is there any easiest way to generate coin address for all coins or can anybody tell how cryptsy do this for all coins? I Believe what you are asking is how can you setup a system which enables users to have ...


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