23

Your bitcoins are lost forever, unless you have the key. Let this be a lesson learned to always write down your keys on paper. There are no ways to recover your bitcoins without the key.


12

The balance will return as soon as the client catches up with the network.


9

You need your 12 words to get it back. Just that. There is no other way. No bank, no insurance company and no helpdesk that you can turn to. No person or computer in the world is able to recover the same wallet without those 12 words. I hope you've written the words down somewhere. Here's where the relevant part of the answer for you ends concerning the ...


9

Depending on what kind of phone you have and depending on what program you used to store your words, you may be able to find a copy of the data on Google Drive (Android default), OneDrive (Microsoft default) or iCloud (Apple default). If you never disabled these services, but do have an account for them, they're probably turned on. Log in online using the ...


9

Are you talking about the people who mined or bought bitcoins in 2009 - 2011 and are surprised that the price is that high now? HD-wallets (wallets with such a recovery phrase, it's called seed) are available since BIP 32 and that was around 2013. So they don't have such a wallet and can't recover anything. That's why they search their old hardware.


8

I wrote a small Python script which can be used to decrypt your encrypted MyWallet. It does the same as the MyWallet JavaScript, only in Python. Edit: the code below seems to be outdated, here's a working version as of May 2012. Copy the following into a file, make it executable, then run it: #!/usr/bin/env python import base64, hashlib, hmac, json, sys, ...


8

There are different "backup-standards". Some use BIP39 (mnemonic) which lacks of a flexible wordlist and versioning. Its used by Leger, Trezor, Bitpay/Copay, etc. Electrum uses a different – more flexible – mnemonic backup concept. Though, it's incompatible with BIP39. But then, there is also the BIP32 keypath which can be different among wallets. Example:...


8

If you're programming savvy you could write a small program that searches for the regular expression of a Bitcoin private key. Bitcoin private keys have a very specific format: They are 51 keys long, start with a '5' and the second letter is either 'H', 'J', or 'K' and use base58 for the remaining 49 letters which excludes the characters 0IOl. It seems to ...


8

I recently recovered an old wallet.dat file using pywalley.py and Electrum, which allowed me to read the wallet and sweep the coins to a new Electrum wallet. Steps: Get the jackjack pywallet https://github.com/jackjack-jj/pywallet Put the wallet.dat in that directory ./pywallet.py --dumpwallet --datadir=. --passphrase=PASSPHRASE Passphrase is optional, ...


8

If you are missing the first word and you know the rest of the 11 words, there are 2048 possible mnemonics but only ~128 of them are valid. Using Python and this library you can print all the valid ones with this simple script: from btctools.HD import check, WORDS phrase = "{x} decrease enjoy credit fold prepare school midnight flower wrong false already" ...


5

Following these instructions, after clicking on Create a new wallet, you will have the option of using a custom secret key.


5

I don't know how to do it via the command line, but you can use the tool at https://blockchain.info/DecryptWallet.html http://pastehtml.com/view/bprww2t3g.html It's basic, but its cross platform and gets the job done. You can also save it offline.


5

Since 0.6.0, key import/export are available in the client itself, though only through RPC. The commands are called dumpprivkey and importprivkey. For example (on testnet): $ ./bitcoind getnewaddress n2JjZgLeCUgfubswxDm9zAaBGSLLHSLdNv $ ./bitcoind dumpprivkey n2JjZgLeCUgfubswxDm9zAaBGSLLHSLdNv ...


5

First, don't panic! Second, make an image backup of the wiped drive to a physically different drive. Third, you maybe able to recover the deleted files with tools such as magic rescue so long as the sectors on your drive that your wallet was wiped from are intact... otherwise you may be out those coins... I've had OK luck with rescuing data off drives for ...


4

Piuk has just made a patch to MultiBit that enables blockchain.info 'json' and 'aes.json' files to be imported. This patch was included in MultiBit 0.3.4. Here is the how-to: Export wallet from blockchain.info -> Import to MultiBit 1) Do a wallet export from blockchain.info 2) Import into MultiBit using the 'Import private keys' screen. 2.1) In the ...


4

Your wallet shows empty because it doesn't really "know" that one or more addresses that it controls "owns" some bitcoins because you manually deleted the blockchain files. It will display your correct balance once it synchronizes again, provided of course that you have not deleted the .wallet file. I would also suggest you take extra care when deleting ...


4

Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash use the same address format. This means that if you take the key from your Bitcoin Core client, and import it to your Bitcoin Cash client, the Bitcoin Cash client will be able to spend that money. However, if someone else operates the Bitcoin Core client, you need to convince them to send you the money.


4

In my case I sent the Bitcoin Cash to an address created by a Mobile Bitcoin (!) wallet from btc.com. The support from btc.com told me the solution: B) You have sent BCC to your BTC wallet: 1. Use your BTC recovery PDF at https://bcc-recovery.btc.com/ (click on 'forgot password' to use your backup PDF) 2. Recover the coins to an address from your BCC ...


4

Firstly, it is highly recommended not to use a brainwallet, your coins will be stolen. But in general, if you have a private key, there is no way to obtain the 12 word recovery phrase from it. That is because the 12 word phrase is used as a seed to generate a hierarchical deterministic master extended private key, as described in BIP 39 and BIP 32 and this ...


4

All of the information in the screenshot is publicly available. And no, they won't be useful for recovering your Bitcoin. If you used Electrum, you either need the wallet, the recovery phrase(seeds) or the private key(s) to recover you Bitcoins. Note that when you first create your wallet, you are instructed to write down the seed (12 or 13 dictionary words)...


4

Jaxx uses a different derivation path than Coinomi when handling ETH. Coinomi opted for the path as described in the ETH specification. Ledger has the same scheme as Coinomi. Jaxx: M/44H/60H/0H/0 Coinomi: M/44H/60H/0H You will have to do the following: Delete any existing ETH wallets you have added by long pressing them (2 sec) in the Overview tab and ...


4

This is impossible. The whole point of public key cryptography is that the public key can be shared with anybody, without compromising the private key. If there were a way to recover the private key using the public key, this would all fall apart, and in particular Bitcoin would be horribly insecure. This hasn't happened. The public key could be used ...


4

What can I do? You could find tools that automate the trying of various combinations of seed-words. Some are mentioned in similar questions here. For example btctools, btcrecover. Use them or adapt them to your needs. Lost my Bitcoin wallet and have only 11 out of 12 mnemonic seed phrase words. How can I get my Bitcoins? Need help to recover blpckchain....


3

The default MultiBit HD wallet uses an address generation scheme known as BIP32. Mycelium uses an address generation scheme known as BIP44. BIP44 is what Trezor uses. HD wallet interoperability is unfortunately a bit thorny. It's normally easier to have two wallets.


3

Install Python 2.7 and download pywallet to your c:\ drive. Copy your corrupt wallet.dat file to c:\ Open a Command Prompt and type: C:\>pywallet.py --dumpwallet --datadir c:\ --wallet=wallet.dat --recover --recov_device=c:\wallet.dat --recov_size=416Gio --recov_outputdir=c:\ It should extract all the keys to a new wallet on c:\ Copy the new wallet....


3

Yes you will be able to access the same coins with both devices. You can think about it like if you make a copy of a key to your home, and give it to someone; both people will be able to open the same door.


3

Yes. Trezor uses BIP39 and is compatible with any other wallet that would. You can in fact import your seed into electrum, though this to some extent defeats the purpose of having a hardware wallet.


3

Bitcoins are stored in the blockchain in the form of unspent transaction outputs, i.e. the product of confirmed transactions. These unspent transaction outputs can be spent if you control the private key corresponding to the address they were signed over to. If a private key is lost irretrievably, the coins will never become spendable again. There is no key ...


3

For Trezor specifically, just check their website for details. Essentially, you need to have: a new or wiped Trezor wallet. your Trezor recovery card, filled out correctly. a computer with the Trezor bridge software installed. You plug the new Trezor into the computer, open the Bridge software, and and follow the "Trezor Recovery" instructions. It will ...


3

1)2) Electrum uses so called "Deterministic wallets". In short this basically means that your entire wallet can be recovered using the seed. Even if you delete the wallet file/ have no private keys, the seed will give you full access. 3) Either every private key of each adress that you used, or the seed.


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