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I'm not sure on the specifics of this particular model, but usually the way these work is the encryption key is stored on a hardware security module, which is a physical chip that performs the encryption and decryption of the data given the right password. To my knowledge you cannot make a copy of this physical chip, and once your attempts at entering the ...


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I think the least "intense" option here would be to look up each of the wallet addresses from your ckey items on a node (i.e. blockchain.info blockchair.com btc.com etc) to see which ones have any value in them. Once you have a list of the wallet addresses that are "worth recovering," you will need to take those ckey items' encrypted ...


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A technique with which I've had success in the past: db5.3_dump corrupted_wallet.dat | db5.3_load fresh_wallet.dat (obviously replacing corrupted_wallet.dat with the actual filename, and making a backup first). and then trying to load fresh_wallet.dat into a modern Bitcoin Core These tools are in the Ubuntu package db5.3-util. Note: you'll need a Bitcoin ...


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How do I restore my 2013 Bitcoin from a Wallet.aes.Json 344 byte file? See https://login.blockchain.com/wallet/import-wallet Drag the wallet file into the area above. Supports blockchain.info (wallet.aes.json) files. There are ways of extracting your private key from that type of backup. You could them import or (better) "sweep" the private key ...


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If you have a 12 word recovery phrase for the old wallet, if the phrase is a BIP-39 recovery phrase and if you can find the derivation path, you should be able to recover control over your money using a standalone wallet that supports BIP-39 and which allows you to specify the derivation path. You could use a list of popular derivation paths as a starting ...


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The best thing to do is use a secure passphrase in addition to your 12/24 word phrase, and keep the passphrase in a separate location, or even no location at all but your head and maybe share it with one or more family members. Using BIP-39, the same 24-words with a different passphrase will create completely disjoint wallets which cannot be linked by ...


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What can I do ... Re-import the addresses to recover the funds? Imported addresses are called "watch-only" or "unspendable" addresses. If you ever had control over the money at these imported addresses you would have had a private-key somewhere for them. To give your current wallet control over that money (the ability to spend it) - ...


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In short, it knows because it knows. Whatever information was used to make the original wallet construct the addresses (whether that consists of a seed, a set of keys, a master key, a descriptor, a mnemonic phrase, ...) must be imported into the new wallet too. The P2SH redeemscript is not created randomly: there is a procedure to generate it from keys the ...


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P2SH addresses can either be P2SH-P2WPKH addresses (wrapped segwit) or they can be multisig or something else. If your wallet is using P2SH-P2WPKH addresses, the wallet should be able to recognize your address upon initialization. Otherwise, you will probably have to manually import that address. Regardless, the amount of btc held in that address is on the ...


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If Blockchaindotcom follows the Bitcoin standard of BIP32, then the 12 words should allow you to recover your funds on any wallet. You can try downloading Bluewallet and recovering the wallet there. You do not need to "import addresses" to access your funds, as long as you have your private keys (which are derived from the 12 words).


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A wallet was brute forced with 8/12 words and their order known in 2020 https://medium.com/@johncantrell97/how-i-checked-over-1-trillion-mnemonics-in-30-hours-to-win-a-bitcoin-635fe051a752


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If you have a custodial account with Exchange.blockchain.com, you must contact them for help. They own the money, not you ("Not your keys -- not your bitcoin"). If you have a non-custodial wallet downloaded from Blockchain.com, you should normally recover control over your money by restoring the wallet from a backup or from a safely stored record ...


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Yes, you could write a simple little program that would iterate through all the possible combinations and generate the address for each one. If you know the address then you could simply compare the generated addresses until it finds the one that matches. If you don't know the address then yes you will need to look on-chain to find the one that has a non-...


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Ben Kaufman answered this on Twitter. The main caveat in a multisig wallet is that, while you need only a threshold of devices (ie. 2 of 3, 3 of 5, etc.) to sign a transaction, losing access to even a single device could potentially prevent you from being able to spend the funds - if you don't back up properly! The reason is that (usually) in order to make a ...


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You are on a wild goose chase. Don't use notepad to investigate files, use a hexdump tool and/or something like the 'strings' command in Linux or in the installable Windows Linux subsystem that Microsoft provide in Windows 10. Don't work on the actual discs, make a low level duplicate, not a file copy, but a copy that includes the contents of unused space. ...


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