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The introduction of descriptor wallets presents an opportunity to introduce a new database backend as descriptor wallets are backwards incompatible. The following is taken from Andrew Chow's blog post on what's coming to the Bitcoin Core wallet in 0.21. (There was also discussion on this GitHub Issue.) Why move from Berkeley DB? Not designed to be used as ...


4

Does it create a public key based of private? Yes, a cryptographic routine exists that computes the public key from the private key. maybe on the wallet.dat file? All modern wallet software generates keys derministically from some sort of master key, or seed phrase. That master key is stored in the wallet, and all other private keys are derived from it, ...


3

Only the private keys are encrypted if you have an encrypted wallet.dat. The passphrase is only asked when those are needed, i.e. when you try to send coins.


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Historically bdb was used for the UTXO as well, so you could justify using it for the wallet as well for consistency. It makes absolutely no sense today, other than that it will always need to be supported to some extent for compatibility. Really the wallet could be replaced with any key value store at all and it would function completely fine. You would ...


2

As you are using the Bitcoin Core wallet you can look at the right bottom if your wallet is locked or unlocked in the padlock icon. Go to Window > Console and type: walletpassphrase "your passphrase" 60 After you type this command and you get an Error "The wallet passphrase entered was incorrect" that means your passphrase is wrong so ...


2

Is this wallet.dat with balance some sort of scam or exploit? It looks like a scam. There is never a good reason to buy a wallet.dat. Looking at these videos, you will notice I guess we will notice whatever the video creator tricks us into noticing. As I'm sure you know, making an app that looks like another app is trivial. As is editing video to make ...


2

This is called steganography. Invented in Greece two and a half thousand years ago. Usually, to make the embedded data inconspicuous the embedded data is distributed throughout the whole image as small variations in hue or luminance etc. People viewing an image would notice an ugly and obvious rectangular patch in a corner. Especially as wallet data might ...


2

Does wallet.dat contain every address that I created? Even if I didn't get any coins from it? Yes To be clear, suppose I run bitcoin-qt in Linux, and, in the GUI, I click on Receive then click on Create new receiving address: At this point, no coins are received. Will this immediately generate a new public-private key pair? Yes. Well, not quite, but in ...


2

It just works fine with the modern versions of the software with no changes necessary. Sync will take anywhere from a few hours to a few days depending on your hardware and connection speed. Make more backups than you think are necessary.


2

I would approach this using JSON-RPC with the programming language of your choice and the walletpassphrase command. walletpassphrase "12345" 60 The 60 at the end is number of seconds before the passphrase times out and needs to be entered again. Now all you need to do is create a loop that iterates through all number combinations. If the guess is ...


1

I would use the dumpwallet approach using Core, then use a script to remove everything but the WIF private keys and import them to Electrum which can import a list of private keys


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An encrypted wallet may be cracked if its password is weak with enough budget and computing power, while a watch-only wallet doesn't give any information other than the address and what can be derived from the address.


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Close core, find your bitcoin.conf file, and change the datadir setting. e.g. # [core] # Specify a non-default location to store blockchain and other data. datadir=/opt/yourdisk Then re-open core. It should pick up where your wallet last synced to on the external drive.


1

It is not so easy to "open" a wallet, because it requires rescanning the blockchain to find the outputs that are relevant. This can take a very lock time, especially if you do not have an SSD. Because the performance is so poor, it would be disappointing for a lot of users to use this hypothetical feature.


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Unused addresses are unrelated to mining activity. Even if you were mining, you will still see many unused addresses. The Bitcoin earned from mining would be associated with a used address. Bitcoin Core by default will generate 1000 (previously 100) unused keys to be used in the "keypool". The keypool is the pool of unused keys and is used as a ...


1

I ran the blockchain during 2009 and 2010 By "ran the blockchain" I guess you mean you ran Bitcoin-core wallet software sometimes known as Bitcoin-qt. I downloaded the Bitcoin.org wallet Bitcoin.org lists many wallets, I guess you mean Bitcoin-core wallet. I found an old file I had renamed to xxxx.dat. There are many different data formats and ...


1

To be safe, you should use BDB 4.8 as that is the version that is used in releases. However using --with-incompatible-bdb should still produce wallet.dat files that can be used with the officially built clients. You may find that people say that the BDB database files are incompatible from version to version. Furthermore Oracle, in their own documentation, ...


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Start Bitcoin Core with the wallet.dat you want to export Dump your private keys via Bitcoin Core's Console using dumpwallet You'll get a list of private key to address pairs in the following format: L4ysibEFMBQc3hfr7tvUyV4nBP1YQ3AgDewszoYq5czMtXotmmro 2020-08-21T14:36:58Z change=1 #addr=bc1qpw40dkvcj23zt3efvdwqr7ddfunwktx11f3tjf Extract all private keys (...


1

Commands can be entered after opening Window -> Console in Bitcoin Core Create a new empty wallet with createwallet 'wallet_name' true https://bitcoincore.org/en/doc/0.17.0/rpc/wallet/createwallet/ Then use importmulti command with "watchonly": true https://bitcoincore.org/en/doc/0.17.0/rpc/wallet/importmulti/


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